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I'd like to call a function in my view or any module for that matter and have it update the response body.

My initial thinking is to implement a process_response middleware to update the response body, and set up a callback that receives signals sent in my function calls, but when I try, the receiver never fires (I've tested the singal/receiver outside of the middleware class/module and it works fine.

Example:

# in module that defines the signal
module.signal.send(msg='this is a message to append on the response body')

# in view or model
signal.connect(callback)

# in middleware.py
def callback(self, sender, *kwargs):
    self.body_text = kwargs.pop('msg')

def process_response(self, request, response):
    response.body = response.body + self.body_text
    return response
share|improve this question
    
How are you getting the response object in the callback? – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 27 '10 at 7:57
    
Eh bad code sample. The method lives in the middleware class, and would set an instance property that could be used to update the response body in the process_response method. – Derek Reynolds Jun 27 '10 at 8:07
    
That isn't going to work. Middleware is instantiated per process, not per request. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 27 '10 at 9:24

If you really wanted to do this you could use request as the go-between.

Use the request started/finished signals to register/deregister a new listener which will add this text to some attribute of your request object.

Then in your process_response middleware, you just have to check for that attribute. You'd also want to be careful about the response status though. There's not really any point in putting anything in the response body if it's a redirect, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not a bad solution. Right now I am just using global vars in my custom module which feels jenky, but it's mainly for development and debugging purposes so I am not too worried about that. – Derek Reynolds Jun 30 '10 at 18:33

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