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My questions is this:

why can not pass "this" to an explicit call to a constructor? example:

class MyClass {

    MyClass x;

    public MyClass(MyClass c){
        x=c;
    }

    public MyClass(){
        this(this);        //error
    }

}
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3  
It is very confusing to start a question with "because". What do you want to do? –  Peter Tillemans Jun 27 '10 at 10:55
    
I don't think that is a question? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 27 '10 at 10:55
    
I must not do anything, just let me know why this thing –  Tanuzzo88 Jun 27 '10 at 11:01
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are trying to pass a reference to this from a constructor to another constructor on the same instance.

In Java you cannot access this implicitly or explicitly in the constructor before returning from an implicit or explicit call to this() or super(). This is because the super class has not yet initialised.

You may need to duplicate code in the constructor:

class MyClass {
    private final MyClass myInstance;
    public MyClass(MyClass myInstance) {
        this.myInstance = myInstance;
    }
    public MyClass() {
        this.myInstance = this;
    }
}

There may be ways to hack around it using a private constructor, but then you are into hacking territory.

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1  
Shouldn't this.myInstance = null; be this.myInstance = this; ? –  Stephen C Jun 27 '10 at 11:11
    
Tom Hawtin thank you for the answer –  Tanuzzo88 Jun 27 '10 at 12:24
    
@Stephen C Yes. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 27 '10 at 12:59
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Why do you think you need to? The other constructor will already know what 'this' is.

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this is a valid use case. The point is the other constructor is expecting a MyClass instance that may or may not be this. –  Stephen C Jun 27 '10 at 15:51
    
Well, yeah. But this seem like a highly convoluted example, plus a bit of a code smell, IMHO. –  dty Jun 27 '10 at 18:36
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Below is a work around to this restriction.

The work around is to pass a temporary holder object to the super class constructor. Then after the super class constructor has done its work, give the temporary holder object a reference to this.

The parameter delta can be used to show the principal shortcoming of this workaround - what if the superclass constructor needs to use the parameter.

import java . lang . reflect . * ;
import java . util . * ;

class Father
{
    public static void main ( String [ ] args )
    {
         ( new Son ( args . length > 0 ) ) . run ( ) ;
    }

    Father ( Runnable runnable , boolean delta )
    {
         super ( ) ;
         if ( delta )
         {
        runnable . run ( ) ;
         }
    }
}

class Son extends Father implements Runnable
{
    private static Map < Thread , TempRunnable > temps = new HashMap < Thread , TempRunnable > ( ) ;

    private static class TempRunnable implements Runnable
    {
         private Son son ;

         TempRunnable ( )
         {
             super ( ) ;
             temps . put ( Thread . currentThread ( ) , this ) ;
         }

         public void run ( )
         {
             son . run ( ) ;
         }
    }

    Son ( boolean delta )
    {
         // super ( this ) ; // the dream
         super ( new TempRunnable ( ) , delta ) ;
         temps . get ( Thread . currentThread ( ) ) . son = this ;
    }

    public void run ( )
    {
         System . out . println ( "Hello World" ) ;
    }
}
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You're trying to pass a reference to the current object into its own constructor? You can't do that for the same reason you can't be your own father...

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Actually, that's nothing to do with why this doesn't work. –  Stephen C Jun 27 '10 at 11:13
    
-1, very unhelpful –  Kieren Johnstone Jun 27 '10 at 11:29
1  
actually utilizing a time machine, a man can be his own father –  emory Jun 27 '10 at 13:25
    
For the code to be valid, "this" as passed into the constructor would have to refer to an initialized instance. However, the null argument constructor is not initializing the instance. It is handing off the initialization task to the other constructor. Passing "this" to the other constructor when it is expecting an initialized instance is a bit like saying "use me to create myself" - which is where I get the analogy that a man cannot be his own father. –  Rob Cooney Jun 27 '10 at 17:48
    
Except 'this' is perfectly valid in a constructor - just not where the OP wants to use it. –  dty Jun 27 '10 at 18:35
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