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Could somebody tell me why this code:

$('#places-view > tbody').find('td').click(function(evt) {
    var td = $(this),
        input = td.find('input');
        console.log('click');
        console.log(input.attr('disabled'), 'disabled');
        if (! input.attr('disabled')) {
            input.trigger('click');
            console.log('inner click');
        }
})

throwing too much recursion error...

Regards

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2 Answers 2

To prevent event bubbling, place event.stopPropagation() in the handler for your input element's click event.

$('#places-view input').click(function(event) {

      // This will prevent the click event from bubbling up and firing
      //    the click event on your <td>
    event.stopPropagation();

      // run the rest of your click code
});

http://api.jquery.com/event.stopPropagation/


EDIT: As @Pointy noted, it may be your intention to have the same handler handle both events, or at least have the td handler still fire when you click the input.

If that's the case, you'll just need to check to see if the td handler was fired by a click on the input, and if so, prevent the input.trigger("click") from running:

$('#places-view > tbody').find('td').click(function(evt) {
    var td = $(this),
        input = td.find('input');
        console.log('click');
        console.log(input.attr('disabled'), 'disabled');
        if (! input.attr('disabled')) {
                // If the target of the click was not the input,
                //   then trigger the click on the input
            if( input.not( evt.target ).length ) {
                input.trigger('click');
                console.log('inner click');
            }
        }
});

Another way to do the test would be:

if(input[0] != evt.target) {...

Both of these approaches assume that there's just one input. If that's not the case, then you'll need to give the input an identifier to allow the test to be more specific.

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This is true, but I have to wonder whether that'd be a good idea. If he indeed wants to handle "click" at the <td> level, it may be bad to cancel bubbling at the <input> because that'll shunt off the clicks to the <td>. Of course it depends on what else is in the table cell. –  Pointy Jun 27 '10 at 14:09
    
@Pointy - You're right. My assumption is that the click for the td is occurring elsewhere in the td, and as such, the handler would be separate. If that's not the case, then OP will probably need to test the evt.target in the td handler to see if the click was on the input, and if so, bypass triggering the click() on the input. –  user113716 Jun 27 '10 at 14:43
    
Good answer, +1 –  Mark Jun 27 '10 at 15:10
    
Thanks a lot folks. Everything is working now. –  Marek Jun 27 '10 at 15:32
    
Saved my bacon! Awesome answer +1 –  DigitalSea Nov 3 '11 at 2:58

When you trigger the "click", it's not really a separate event dispatch loop — jQuery is going to run the handlers right there and then. Since your <input> is inside your <td>, the event is going to bubble out to the <td> itself, where it'll run smack into that handler again.

Also note that this line here:

console.log(input.attr('disabled'), 'disabled');

is maybe not what you want - I think that'll always log the word "disabled". Maybe you meant

console.log(input.attr('disabled') + ' disabled');
share|improve this answer
    
I am using firebug console, so in my case all works as expected. –  Marek Jun 27 '10 at 15:34

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