Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i thought, that i understand what references do. but now i meet an example, which can't understand anyway.

i saw an interesting script here, but why he use & in this script i can't understand. here is the part of script

foreach ($nodeList as $nodeId => &$node) 
{
    if (!$node['id_parrent'] || !array_key_exists($node['id_parrent'], $nodeList)) 
    {
        $tree[] = &$node;
    } 
    else 
    {
        $nodeList[$node['id_parrent']]['children'][] =&$node;
    }
}

if he doesn't make any changes on $node, why it is needed to use references here? there is nothing like $node = any changes, so why use =& $node, instead $node?

maybe you will help me to understand?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
understanded. thanks much (p.s it is very useful thing, references:) –  Syom Jun 27 '10 at 13:58
    
This is something they teach you in C language courses. You're asked to create a link-list using C arrays; this is the same except instead of storing references to prev/next you store references of children. –  Salman A Aug 18 '12 at 9:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

$tree[] = &$node;

When you do it like this, the tree array will store references to the same nodes as in the node list. If you change a node from the node list, it will be changed in the tree too and vice-versa of course. The same applies to the children array.

Without using references, the tree and children array would simply contain a copy of the node.

share|improve this answer

I would suggest you to have a look at:

PHP: Pass by reference vs. Pass by value

This easily demonstrates why you need to pass variables by reference (&).

Example code taken:

function pass_by_value($param) {
  push_array($param, 4, 5);
}

$ar = array(1,2,3);

pass_by_value($ar);

foreach ($ar as $elem) {
  print "<br>$elem";
}

The code above prints 1, 2, 3. This is because the array is passed as value.

function pass_by_reference(&$param) {
  push_array($param, 4, 5);
}

$ar = array(1,2,3);

pass_by_reference($ar);

foreach ($ar as $elem) {
  print "<br>$elem";
}

The code above prints 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. This is because the array is passed as reference, meaning that the function (pass_by_reference) doesn't manipulate a copy of the variable passed, but the actual variable itself.

share|improve this answer

if he doesn't make any changes on $node, why it is needed to use references here? there is nothing like $node = any changes, so why use =& $node, instead $node?

Because using a reference also saves you from copying the variable, thus saving memory and (in a usually negligeable dimension) performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually that is not the case anymore with objects, as of PHP 5. In fact the entire call-time pass-by-reference construct is deprecated in PHP 5.3 anyway. –  user268396 Jun 27 '10 at 14:10
    
@user $node is an array. –  Pekka 웃 Jun 27 '10 at 14:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.