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I'm taking an online java class and the teacher has asked for the following: Write a menu program that ask a user for a number indicating the four basic math equations(addition, subtraction, multiplication, division). Using a if/else structure to do the required operation, ask the user for inputs and solve the equation. I am new to this, but I don't see the point of the if/else, but I guess that is irrelavent.

If I use case 1, 2, 3, 4 as below to determine the operation, how do I refference the case with a 'If statement'?

int userSelection;
double x;        
double y;        
double answer;

switch ( userSelection ) {
   case 1:
        TextIO.putln("Let's add! ");
        TextIO.putln();
        TextIO.putln("Enter the first number: ");
        x = TextIO.getlnDouble();
    TextIO.putln("Enter the second number: ");
        y = TextIO.getlnDouble();
        break;

//I thought I could use the 'If' like this

        if (case 1);  // I don't know how to refference this correctly
        answer = x + y;
        TextIO.putln( x 'plus' y 'equals' answer);

Thanks in advance!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It would appear to me that your instructor does not want you to use the switch statement to begin with, but simply use the if flow control structure:

if(booleanExpression)
{

}
else if(booleanExpression2)
{

}
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If you're using a straight up if statement, how are you handling this requirement: "ask a user for a number indicating the four basic math equations"? –  Chris Jun 27 '10 at 14:59
    
I am not sure that asking the user these questions is directly linked to the requirement to use if statements for solving the equations. –  Oded Jun 27 '10 at 17:45
    
I was making this way to hard and I don't have to use the switch statement. Just make a list of choices. I couldn't see the forest for all the trees. Thanks everyone!!! –  jjason89 Jun 27 '10 at 22:30

The switch is used against a single given variable/expression and then cases are used on what value it is but because you are not testing a single variable/expression, this is not applicable, you should use if-elseif-else structure instead.

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The switch case statements is a structural alternative to using nested if..else statements where you want to run differnet logic for different values of a numerical or enumerical data type. It does not combine with if..else and the 2 are different approaches to solve conditional problems. Which one is better suited depends on the condition you are evaluating.

If I understand your code correctly, then I think you are looking for something like this:

switch ( userSelection ) {  
case 1:  
    TextIO.putln("Let's add! ");  
    TextIO.putln();  
    TextIO.putln("Enter the first number: ");  
    x = TextIO.getlnDouble();  
    TextIO.putln("Enter the second number: ");  
    y = TextIO.getlnDouble();  
    answer = x + y;    
    TextIO.putln( x + " plus " + y + " equals " + answer);   
    break;  
case 2:  
    ... //oh, I don't know. but I would guess: let's subtract!  
    break; 
case 3:  
    ... //let's multiply!
    break; 
case 4:  
    ... //let's divide! 
    break; 

}

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This is how I started, but because she wanted a letter selection to choose the operation and if/else for the operations I thought I would use a Case statment to get user input. 1 for add, 2 for subtract and so on. Then if I could use IF 'case =1' then do the following math operation.??? –  jjason89 Jun 27 '10 at 20:36

Here's the presudo code for a rewrite of a CASE statement:

IF (Case==1) THEN
  *What to do when Case==1.*
ELSE IF (Case==2) THEN
  *What to do when Case==2.*
ELSE IF (Case==3) THEN
  *What to do when Case==3.*
ELSE IF (Case==4) THEN
  *What to do when Case==4.*
END IF

You'll have to code this in Java though. :) Good luck with your assignment.

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Looks like your first if has a === refugee from JavaScript –  barrowc Jun 27 '10 at 23:20
    
@barrowc - Oops... that was a typo. Fixed. Thanks. :) –  Gert Grenander Jun 27 '10 at 23:26

You're switching on userSelection so userSelection already has the value you need; you can reference the value by referencing the userSelection variable:

if (userSelection == 1) {
    // add
} else if (userSelection == 2) {
   // subtract
} else if (userSelection == 3) {
   // multiply
} else if (userSelection == 2) {
   // divide
}
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