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On all iPhones (we checked) which have been updated to iOS4, our app is behaving differently (buggy) than on previous OS version (3.1.3). First and most biggest problem is that on 3G (but not on 3GS), any UIAlertView freezes the app - actually it looks like that app losses focus to give it to UIAlertView, but UIAlertView doesn't get the focus either. I have to note that my app is using OpenGL ES 1.1.

Other bugs look like some variables get different initial settings. For example, color picker starts with yellow color instead black, multitouch counter gives wrong results, etc...

Even this freezes the app:

UIAlertView *alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:nil message:@"Please read help before using Facebook/Twitter/Flickr" 
                                               delegate:self 
                                      cancelButtonTitle:@"OK" 
                                      otherButtonTitles:nil, nil]; 
[alert show]; 
[alert release];

Anyone having any idea?

Edit: Just wanted to inform you that we fixed all issues. Some troubles were found while carefully inspecting our code and finding stuff we did wrong. In iOS3 the same bugs waren't noticable because OS itself is more faster, but crippled app to death in iOS4. Also some variables needed to be initalized to default value (example - int x = 0; instead int x;) and then things started to work as expected.

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What are you showing in your UIAlertView? Is it showing anything number related? How about the color picker? I would think about the OS and how it deals with data types here. (Specifically different number types.) –  Moshe Jun 27 '10 at 20:17
    
Even this freezes the app: UIAlertView *alert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:nil message:@"Please read help before using Facebook/Twitter/Flickr" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"OK" otherButtonTitles:nil, nil]; [alert show]; [alert release]; –  duke4e Jun 27 '10 at 20:45
    
Are you sure that you're not messing around with the internal view hierarchy of UIAlertView or other system UI elements? That hierarchy is not guaranteed to remain the same between OS updates and changes like this have broken other applications after OS updates (which is why Apple strongly discourages this). –  Brad Larson Jun 28 '10 at 14:58
    
Clarification: Does this occur when the app was installed with an earlier version and the phone was then upgraded to iOS4 or does it happen when the app is newly installed on iOS4 as well? –  TechZen Jun 28 '10 at 15:15
    
I am seeing something similar with an app of mine. Did you have any luck getting to the bottom of this? –  Z S Jul 12 '10 at 0:42
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3 Answers 3

As trite as it sounds, check your memory management carefully. As the frameworks evolve significantly between major releases, any latent memory management problems in your code might likely be the source of such weirdness.

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Yeah, but the problem is that instruments/leaks still don't report any weirdnesses. –  duke4e Jun 27 '10 at 20:54
    
@duke4e - Just because Instruments doesn't immediately show a problem doesn't mean one isn't there. Also, don't just look for leaks in the Leaks instrument, check to make sure that overall memory usage isn't steadily increasing in Memory Monitor and look for other odd behavior. –  Brad Larson Jun 28 '10 at 14:56
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I would think that one 'nil' would do the job for 'otherButtonTitles'. Could the second one be causing the crash?

If not, what errors are being reported on your console at the time of crash?

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That's a perfectly valid argument (the second nil is acting as a sentinel for a list), and in fact a certain new compiler throws a warning if you don't do this. –  Brad Larson Jun 28 '10 at 15:00
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We found that iOS 4 is much, much more aggressive on memory management issues when compared to iOS 3. This makes a lot of sense from a design perspective as Apple now has to worry about a large number of applications potentially operating at the same time. We had a large number crash bugs caused by poor memory management that didn't show at all in iOS 3.

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