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For a project, I need to analyze the differences in development time between two different frameworks to implement the same thing.

I can't just time myself writing one then time myself writing the other, because I will almost inevitably write the second one faster having experienced pitfalls and fixes while writing the first one.

My first instinct would be to use simple metrics as a heuristic, such as number of bytes, number of word or LOC.

I know there exist other measurements of code size such as Halstead complexity measures, however I don't think these correlate accurately with development time.

In this particular instance, I'm interested in solely the development time. I'm aware that maintenance time probably does correlate fairly strongly with complexity measures, but assume this is for writing a completely new feature which has no dependencies on previously written code.

Suggestions?

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As simple as it sounds, I'd suggest "go with the one which feels better". Simply because programming is after all creative work, and if a framework feels tiresome to work with, making changes in the future might consume huge amounts of time. –  Robus Jun 27 '10 at 22:53
    
It is not clear: you will develop on a framework and someone else on a different framework? –  Lorenzo Jun 27 '10 at 22:54
    
This isn't your normal "which framework should I use" question. The whole point of the project is the analysis itself, I think. –  MatW Jun 27 '10 at 23:01
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If the analysis isn't the point though, +1 to Robus' comment... Just code anything in both frameworks to give yourself an idea of which you prefer. Doing it any other way would suggest you'd be prepared to code in a framework you hate, simply because your tests proved one slightly faster than the other. Which would be crazy. CRAZY!!!1! :) –  MatW Jun 27 '10 at 23:02
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I agree that coding is creative work and that ultimately, you should choose whichever feels better, but that's a difficult thing to argue in an official report attempting to recommend a framework for use. –  Jamie Wong Jun 27 '10 at 23:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I can't just time myself writing one then time myself writing the other, because I will almost inevitably write the second one faster having experienced pitfalls and fixes while writing the first one.

You can compensate for this by having two test subjects. Let test subject A code in framework 1 first, framework 2 second; let test subject B first use framework 2 then framework 1. Scale the values by the total development time of the developer to compensate for difference in skill, then average for each framework.

This is more of a science methodology answer than a programming answer though... :)

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I don't know why this didn't occur to me! There are still a number of biases associated with their prior experience with the frameworks, however that should be a consideration on which framework to use anyway. –  Jamie Wong Jun 27 '10 at 23:10

I suggest you apply the Goal-Question-Metric (GQM) approach:

  1. Determine what your goal is.
  2. Define one or more questions that will help you achieve that goal (once you obtain the answers).
  3. Select the metrics that will allow you to answer those questions.

Good luck!

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Hadn't heard of this before - thanks! –  Jamie Wong Jun 27 '10 at 23:26
    
You're welcome! –  CesarGon Jun 29 '10 at 15:52

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