Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just saw code similar to this:

public class Scratch
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Integer a = 1000, b = 1000;
        System.out.println(a == b);

        Integer c = 100, d = 100;
        System.out.println(c == d);
    }
}

When ran, this block of code will print out:

false
true

I understand why the first is false: because the two objects are separate objects, so the == compares the references. But I can't figure out, why is the second statement returning true? Is there some strange autoboxing rule that kicks in when an Integer's value is in a certain range? What's going on here?

share|improve this question
1  
Looks like a dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/1514910/… –  RC. Jun 28 '10 at 5:49
1  
@RC - Not quite a dupe, but a similar situation is discussed. Thanks for the reference though. –  Joel Jun 28 '10 at 6:06
    
this is horrible. this is why I never understood the point of that whole primitive, but object, but both, but auto-boxed, but depends, but aaaaaaaaargh. –  njzk2 Jul 10 at 20:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 43 down vote accepted

The true line is actually guaranteed by the language specification. From section 5.1.7:

If the value p being boxed is true, false, a byte, a char in the range \u0000 to \u007f, or an int or short number between -128 and 127, then let r1 and r2 be the results of any two boxing conversions of p. It is always the case that r1 == r2.

The discussion goes on, suggesting that although your second line of output is guaranteed, the first isn't (see the last paragraph quoted below):

Ideally, boxing a given primitive value p, would always yield an identical reference. In practice, this may not be feasible using existing implementation techniques. The rules above are a pragmatic compromise. The final clause above requires that certain common values always be boxed into indistinguishable objects. The implementation may cache these, lazily or eagerly.

For other values, this formulation disallows any assumptions about the identity of the boxed values on the programmer's part. This would allow (but not require) sharing of some or all of these references.

This ensures that in most common cases, the behavior will be the desired one, without imposing an undue performance penalty, especially on small devices. Less memory-limited implementations might, for example, cache all characters and shorts, as well as integers and longs in the range of -32K - +32K.

share|improve this answer
8  
It may also be worth noting that autoboxing is actually just syntactic sugar for calling the valueOf method of the box class (like Integer.valueOf(int)). Interesting that the JLS defines the exact unboxing desugaring - using intValue() et al - but not the boxing desugaring. –  gustafc Jun 28 '10 at 6:44
public class Scratch
{
   public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Integer a = 1000, b = 1000;  //1
        System.out.println(a == b);

        Integer c = 100, d = 100;  //2
        System.out.println(c == d);
   }
}

Output:

false
true

Yep the first output is produced for comparing reference; 'a' and 'b' - these are two different reference. In point 1, actually two references are created which is similar as -

Integer a = new Integer(1000);
Integer b = new Integer(1000);

The second output is produced because the JVM tries to save memory, when the Integer falls in a range (from -128 to 127). At point 2 no new reference of type Integer is created for 'd'. Instead of creating new object for the Integer type reference variable 'd', it only assigned with previously created object referenced by 'c'. All of these are done by JVM.

These memory saving rules are not only for Integer. for memory saving purpose, two instances of the following wrapper objects (while created through boxing), will always be == where their primitive values are the same:

  • Boolean
  • Byte
  • Character from \u0000 to \u007f (7f is 127 in decimal)
  • Short and Integer from -128 to 127
share|improve this answer

Integer objects in some range (I think maybe -128 through 127) get cached and re-used. Integers outside that range get a new object each time.

share|improve this answer

Yes, there is a strange autoboxing rule that kicks in when the values are in a certain range. When you assign a constant to an Object variable, nothing in the language definition says a new object must be created. It may reuse an existing object from cache.

In fact, the JVM will usually store a cache of small Integers for this purpose, as well as values such as Boolean.TRUE and Boolean.FALSE.

share|improve this answer

That is an interesting point. In the book Effective Java suggests always to override equals for your own classes. Also that, to check equality for two object instances of a java class always use the equals method.

public class Scratch
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Integer a = 1000, b = 1000;
        System.out.println(a.equals(b));

        Integer c = 100, d = 100;
        System.out.println(c.equals(d));
    }
}

returns:

true
true
share|improve this answer

My guess is that Java keeps a cache of small integers that are already 'boxed' because they are so very common and it saves a heck of a lot of time to re-use an existing object than to create a new one.

share|improve this answer

In Java the boxing works in the range between -128 and 127 for an Integer. When you are using numbers in this range you can compare it with the == operator. For Integer objects outside the range you have to use equals.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.