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I am trying to create a buttonbar using simple <div> and change its opacity to 50% and give a background

But the elements which come inside this division exhibit the same transparency as there parent <div>. I want them to retain 100% opacity. (Which is not possible). How to make this Possible?

A sample CSS of what I am trying to do is this

<style>    
    #bar { background:#09f;opacity:0.5; }
    #bar a { background:#FF0;opacity:1; }
</style>
<div id="bar">
    <a href="#">Home</a>
    <a href="#">Contact</a>
    <a href="#">Feedback</a> 
</div>
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to use the rgba property for that, since opacity affects all children.

#bar { background: rgba(0, 120, 255, 0.5); }

Chris Coyier (CSS-tricks) has written a post about this: http://css-tricks.com/rgba-browser-support/

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Best possible answer with the RGBA 4th Param :) +1 –  RobertPitt Jun 28 '10 at 10:26
    
But this is not IE Compatible –  Starx Jun 28 '10 at 10:55
    
@Starx neither is opacity Do as @RobertPitt says, include the rgba as a secondary parameter, so you have a fall-back for IE. If you want a more cross-browser compatible solution, use oezi's answer: transparent png (won't work in IE6, though), which isn't as fluid as using only CSS, but will work with IE7+. –  peirix Jun 28 '10 at 13:01
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if you want only the background to be opaque, you could use a transparent png or an rgba-value as background. otherwise this isn't possible (as you mentioned).

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Set the opacity in your graphics editor and flatten the two layers together.

You can also add another element.

(You should also be using a list.)

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