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Next month my company is going to release one of of our technologies as an open-source project. We're now preparing the website, documentation and so on. The question I'd like to ask is:

Which open-source projects would you recommend as a reference of a well-documented, well-presented project?

We're looking for open-source projects which have good website presentation, documentation, tutorials, samples and so on. Projects we could learn from.

(A couple of words about our project, if it is relevant: it is a JavaScript library for web mapping, based on OpenLayers.)

My examples would be JQuery or Vaadin.

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Not a duplicate - that question's about documentation; this one's broader. –  Roger Lipscombe Jul 2 '10 at 9:35
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Indeed, but this question should be made CW, there is just no single (non subjective) answer. –  Pascal Thivent Jul 4 '10 at 22:54
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closed as not constructive by Will Apr 9 '12 at 11:44

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23 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

The Django framework is well-documented, has it's own book, a nice website, thorough contribution policy, and much more. What more could you want?

One nice thing to note (and I know a lot of other projects do this), is they include the docs as part of the trunk, so when someone submits a patch, they include the changes to the documentation at the same time. This really helps keeping everything in sync.

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agreed. Not my favorite python web framework, but man is their website pretty and their documentation comprehensive. And their official tutorials! Oh! –  colinmarc Jul 8 '10 at 23:32
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Which open-source projects would you recommend as a reference of a well-documented, well-presented project?

Qt 4. It is dual-licensed (commercial/LGPL), so it is technically not 100% pure opensource, but you can't beat documentation and tutorials.

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Yeah..it is pretty good actually. They have lots of downloadable samples which I found immensely helpful. –  Mark Jul 3 '10 at 23:41
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What's this "not 100% pure open source"? It's open source, period. LGPL is less restrictive than the GPL, which covers most open source software. And on top of that, they offer a commercial license to anyone who needs more than the LGPL provides. –  Lucas Jul 4 '10 at 0:10
    
@Lucas: Not pure means they have commercial version. If they dual/triple-license their product, they(qt developers) can't really accept patches from anyone else (unless patch submitters surrender their rights to them). If they start accepting patches from everyone, they'll have to use separate source tree for commercial and LGPL version, or they won't be able to legally grab this code into commercial version. –  SigTerm Jul 4 '10 at 6:11
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@SigTerm They accept patches from anyone. qt.gitorious.org/qt/pages/QtContributionGuidelines Spare us the FUD. Open source is open source, it doesn't preclude selling the software under a commercial license to those who need it. –  Lucas Jul 4 '10 at 12:01
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@SigTerm It is absolutely clear that Nokia are fine, as you would see if you'd spent 2 minutes looking into it. See qt.nokia.com/merge_requests/agreement. Please stop spreading FUD. –  JosephH Jul 8 '10 at 12:51
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I've seen a lot of prise for sqlite in that regard. Both source code, tests and documentation are clean, well maintained and plentiful.

They might not have the coolest web designers, but they focus on the important stuff.

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I read about their testing process and it was really interesting! –  MartyIX Jul 2 '10 at 9:43
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MooTools is very throughly documented and its possibly my favorite JS lib next to ProtoType. Its MIT Licensed (if that matters to you) and, from what I can remember, its very elegantly written.

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I am biased, but I think Kuali does a pretty good job: http://www.kuali.org/

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http://codeigniter.com/

I find this documentation super simple to use - as always a user forum is also handy for feedback.

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Ack! I found that to be awfully user unfriendly!! First I had to find that it was actually called "user guide" which sounds more like a "getting started" than reference page. And then to navigate that damn thing! Took me like 40 seconds to notice the little ToC at the very top of the page! –  Mark Jul 3 '10 at 23:40
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Unfortunately I'm still not sure wether code igniter itself is terrible or if the guy who worked my current project before me made a mess of it, but CI now makes me want to cry. definitely don't look to CI to pick up best practices –  Kris Jul 8 '10 at 11:44
    
The documentation appears super simple until you realise how many edge cases it leaves out. I found the forum responses (to other's questions, I didn't ask any) anything but handy as well and more on the "why would you want to do that, go make your own plugin" path. –  Matt Mitchell Jul 9 '10 at 2:45
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We're looking for open-source projects which have good website presentation, documentation, tutorials, samples and so on. Projects we could learn from.

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Drupal! http://drupal.org/handbook - very good documentation.. etc.. But this is among "big guys".

I also like http://teambox.com/ : exactly what you need for documentation.

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I like the look, layout and features (especially the community) of the Ubuntu site

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Wordpress? Like others, has a nice website, online documentation and is in use by quite a few people.

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Yes, a great suggestion. –  Rab Jul 9 '10 at 10:18
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Ruby.

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Blender 3D is very professional and very well-documented. You can find developer documentation, end-user documentation (complete with tutorials and video tutorials), an end-user website, and books...

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I agree on Blender, although the learning curve for new users even with 3D experience is notorious. Still, it is as good or better than the commercial products, and the documentation is quite good. –  Rab Jul 9 '10 at 10:20
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Django project. Great code, great documentation, great support, organized release policy.

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I hereby nominate Aubit4GL http://www.aubit.com/

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When I was working with HtmlUnit I thought it was quite well-presented and well-documented. Also very actively maintained, which is nice.

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I'm a fan of the Sass and Haml docs which both use http://yardoc.org/
I find the live search of classes and methods (top right tabs) really quick and handy.

They also both have simple, nicely designed home pages (Haml home and Sass home) that spell out what they do too for giving people a quick insight.

Also Sinatra has a pretty simple approach, which like django, has a "book", it's got a similar api to Sass and Haml, and you can check it all out on github.

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I was using Ogre3D in one of my projects for about 9 months and it was very well commented.

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I think www.php.net is the way to go in terms of useful links, searchable updatable documentation, links to useful libraries, notes on upcoming realeases etc. etc.

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I particularly like the user contributed notes in the documentation. –  Devon_C_Miller Jul 8 '10 at 21:07
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It's slightly less commonly used than some of the other suggestions here, but I've had great experiences with the Fog Project. The documentation is excellent, as are the Wiki/Forums. Ubuntu is another good one, though that has already been mentioned here.

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Try taking a look at Yii it's a PHP framework for MVC applications (both for the web and the commandline) with a decent database abstraction layer, good code quality and consistency and its not bogged down by wanting to support ancient php installations.

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I would strongly recommend you to include somebody who is working in open source for the past couple of years, and get advice from him.

It is more effective than following something, as he can give you directions instantly and make your objective a grand success.

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I vote for grails! A groovy based framework built on top of Spring MVC. I personally use it, it's good.

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Take a look at Ghostscript, which is/was also alternatively licensed and well supported in industry: http://ghostscript.com/

Others mentioned Ubuntu before me, and I will second/third/nth those recommendations.

I think git is well presented, take a look at http://git-scm.com/documentation if you're not familiar.

There are different levels of polish in foss projects depending on the assumed user base. Projects for developers can seem crusty to normal users. A lot of projects never make it to the level of polish that attracts masses of users and developers.

The gnome and KDE desktop environments are both worth looking at. http://www.gnome.org/ and http://www.kde.org/ respectively. Any project can benefit from a big button that says "help! I'm not superhuman but I want to learn this" and then holds their hand and walks them through... but of course there is a lot of writing and art/screenshots involved in something like that.

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