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I need strong password validation regex

Special Characters - Not Allowed
Spaces - Not Allowed
Numeric Character - At least one character
At least one Capital Letter 
Minimum and Maximum Length of field - 6 to 12 Characters
Repetitive Characters - Allowed only two repetitive characters

my Regex is ^(?=.*\d)(?=.*[a-z])(?=.*[A-Z])(?!.*\s)(?=(?:(\w)(?!\1{2}))+).{6,12}$ but it ignores special characters (where to add?)

Please help!

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10  
What led you to believe that a regular expression was the best way to solve this problem? –  Greg Hewgill Jun 28 '10 at 8:40
6  
Why are you disallowing spaces and special characters? Doesn't that make it a weak password regex, instead of a strong one? Your criteria also disallow the user entering a passphrase (a series of words, much longer than a normal password) since you require a digit, no spaces, and limit the length of the password. –  Douglas Jun 28 '10 at 8:41
    
Douglas, special characters allowed only (@) however: *, -, + etc is not allowed special characters. This is a task :) –  Maxim Jun 28 '10 at 8:45
1  
These rules do not create a strong password. They are a long way off. microsoft.com/protect/fraud/passwords/create.aspx –  Barry Jun 28 '10 at 8:47
    
When you have a long regex like that it's often worth breaking it down into multiple shorter ones, or inserting line breaks and white space as logical delimiters with the ignore white space flag set. –  Phil Gan Jun 28 '10 at 10:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted
^(?=.*[A-Z])(?=.*\d)(?!.*(.)\1\1)[a-zA-Z0-9@]{6,12}$
  • Special Characters - Not Allowed
  • Spaces - Not Allowed
  • Minimum and Maximum Length of field - 6 to 12 Characters
    Met by [a-zA-Z0-9@]{6,12}
  • Numeric Character - At least one character
    Met by positive lookahead (?=.*\d)
  • At least one Capital Letter
    Met by positive lookahead (?=.*[A-Z])
  • Repetitive Characters - Allowed only two repetitive characters
    I am not sure what you mean by this. The negative lookahead (?!.*(.)\1\1) makes sure that no character is allowed to appear more than two times in a row. Substring aa is okay, aaa is not.
    Make it (?!.*(.+)\1\1) to reject repeated substrings of length more than one (like ababab) or add .* before \1 to reject non-continuous repeated appearances too.
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Repetitive Characters - i mean: allowed paassword, and not allowed paaassword or passsword. What i need to do in this case? –  Maxim Jun 28 '10 at 9:13
    
I still insist my code is much more readable/maintainable! Bah, regex for everyting and anything. –  Noldorin Jun 28 '10 at 9:25
1  
@Maxim It seems my understanding was correct. The given regex should do it. –  Amarghosh Jun 28 '10 at 9:29
    
@Noldorin I kind of agree with you. Regexes and kids are alike - understanding/maintaining someone else's stuff can be a headache. That said, regex is compact and its fun to write them :) –  Amarghosh Jun 28 '10 at 9:32
    
@Amarghosh: Fun to write indeed, just not to read heh. Thus the downfall of Perl... –  Noldorin Jun 28 '10 at 10:34

Doesn't sound like a task particularly suited for Regex, since you want to test multiple conditions simultaneously. (You could use multiple regexes, but then normal C# with LINQ is a nicer way to test it.) Try the following function:

public static bool IsStrongPassword(string password)
{
    // Minimum and Maximum Length of field - 6 to 12 Characters
    if (password.Length < 6 || password.Length > 12)
        return false;

    // Special Characters - Not Allowed
    // Spaces - Not Allowed
    if (!(password.All(c => char.IsLetter(c) || char.IsDigit(c))))  
        return false;

    // Numeric Character - At least one character
    if (!password.Any(c => char.IsDigit(c)))
        return false;

    // At least one Capital Letter
    if (!password.Any(c => char.IsUpper(c)))
        return false;

    // Repetitive Characters - Allowed only two repetitive characters
    var repeatCount = 0;
    var lastChar = '\0';
    foreach(var c in password)
    {
        if (c == lastChar)
            repeatCount++;
        else
            repeatCount = 0;
        if (repeatCount == 2)
            return false;
        lastChar = c;
    }

    return true;
}

Make sure you import System.Linq of course, and you're set to go.

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Repetative characters ? –  Maxim Jun 28 '10 at 8:50
    
Maybe one could combine the above LINQ approach with a couple of regexps that test stuff that regexps are good at? –  Martin Wickman Jun 28 '10 at 9:03
1  
@Maxim: Edited, that's included now. Repetitive characters is the only test I might do using regex, but I think the current approach is still fine. –  Noldorin Jun 28 '10 at 9:04
2  
+1: This method looks more maintainable than using a single regex. IMO even breaking down the single regex into smaller ones would be a step in the right direction. –  Phil Gan Jun 28 '10 at 10:35
    
@Noldorin char.IsNumeric(c) should be char.IsDigit(c). Just a note of caution for anyone who comes here in future to use this. –  ashutosh raina Jan 24 '13 at 19:02

In the answer of Noldorin the char.IsNumeric should be replaced by char.IsDigit for c# / .NET 4.0

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You can search the regex library

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The following Jquery plugin called pwdMeter works and seems like a cool way to show the user what is and what isn't a strong password.

http://shouvik.net/pwdmeter.php

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