Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code like this to move the player in my game left, right, up, and down:

keysSetRepeat(20, 5);

while (lives) {
    scanKeys();

    if (keysDownRepeat() & (KEY_LEFT | KEY_RIGHT | KEY_UP | KEY_DOWN)) {
    	u8 new_x = x;
    	u8 new_y = y;

    	if (keysDownRepeat() & KEY_LEFT) {
    		new_x--;
    	} else if (keysDownRepeat() & KEY_RIGHT) {
    		new_x++;
    	} else if (keysDownRepeat() & KEY_DOWN) {
    		new_y++;
    	} else if (keysDownRepeat() & KEY_UP) {
    		new_y--;
    	}

    	// ...
    }

    // ...

    swiWaitForVBlank();
}

Why are the keys not being detected? If I replace keysDownRepeat() with keysDown() it works (without the repeat rate, of course). The documentation is no help here.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I had to find the libnds source code to figure this out. Look at the implementation of keysDownRepeat():

uint32 keysDownRepeat(void) {
    uint32 tmp = keysrepeat;

    keysrepeat = 0;

    return tmp;
}

It actually returns the keys then resets them back to 0. This wasn't documented. I solved this by storing the result of keysDownRepeat() into a variable and using the variable to check the keys:

keysSetRepeat(20, 5);

while (lives) {
    scanKeys();
    u32 keys_down_repeat = keysDownRepeat();

    if (keys_down_repeat & (KEY_LEFT | KEY_RIGHT | KEY_UP | KEY_DOWN)) {
    	u8 new_x = x;
    	u8 new_y = y;

    	if (keys_down_repeat & KEY_LEFT) {
    		new_x--;
    	} else if (keys_down_repeat & KEY_RIGHT) {
    		new_x++;
    	} else if (keys_down_repeat & KEY_DOWN) {
    		new_y++;
    	} else if (keys_down_repeat & KEY_UP) {
    		new_y--;
    	}

    	// ...
    }

    // ...

    swiWaitForVBlank();
}
share|improve this answer

Note also that you have keysHeld() to identify keys that are "still hold down" from the previous frame, while keysDown() is typically designed to help you identify "keys that have just beeing pressed this frame" (that is, between two calls of scanKeys()). keysDownRepeat() is obviously useful for people that wants keyboard-like behaviour for scrolling through lists with the DPAD: you'll repeatedly see the key "down again" every X frame. Admittedly, though, the semantic of keysDownRepeat() is poorly defined ...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.