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Question: I want to define a global exception handler for unhandled exceptions in my console application. In asp.net, one can define one in global.asax, and in windows applications /services, one can define as below

AppDomain currentDomain = AppDomain.CurrentDomain;
currentDomain.UnhandledException += new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(MyExceptionHandler);

But how can I define a global exception handler for a console application ?
currentDomain seems not to work (.NET 2.0) ?

Edit:

Argh, stupid mistake.
In VB.NET, one needs to add the "AddHandler" keyword in front of currentDomain, or else one doesn't see the UnhandledException event in IntelliSense...
That's because the VB.NET and C# compilers treat event handling differently.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 90 down vote accepted

No, that's the correct way to do it. This worked exactly as it should, something you can work from perhaps:

using System;

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += UnhandledExceptionTrapper;
        throw new Exception("Kaboom");
    }

    static void UnhandledExceptionTrapper(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e) {
        Console.WriteLine(e.ExceptionObject.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Press Enter to continue");
        Console.ReadLine();
        Environment.Exit(1);
    }
}
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Argh, stupid mistake, I need to add AddHandler in front of AppDomain.CurrentDomain to see "UnhandledException" in VB.NET... –  Quandary Jul 1 '10 at 8:36
1  
I implemented what you proposed here, but I don't want to exit the application. I just want to log it, and continue the process (without Console.ReadLine() or any other disturbance of program flow. But what I get is the exception re-raising again and again, and again. –  Test Mar 17 '13 at 12:05
1  
@Shahrooz Jefri: You can't continue once you get an unhandled exception. The stack is messed up, and this is terminal. If you have a server, what you can do in UnhandledExceptionTrapper is restart the program with the same command line arguments. –  Quandary Apr 5 '13 at 7:30
1  
It most certainly does! We're not talking about the Application.ThreadException event here. –  Hans Passant Nov 11 '13 at 16:17
1  
@Tomas: That's why there is Application.ThreadException as well. –  Quandary Jan 30 at 17:13
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If you have a single-threaded application, you can use a simple try/catch in the Main function, however, this does not cover exceptions that may be thrown outside of the Main function, on other threads, for example (as noted in other comments). This code demonstrates how an exception can cause the application to terminate even though you tried to handle it in Main (notice how the program exits gracefully if you press enter and allow the application to exit gracefully before the exception occurs, but if you let it run, it terminates quite unhappily):

static bool exiting = false;

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   try
   {
      System.Threading.Thread demo = new System.Threading.Thread(DemoThread);
      demo.Start();
      Console.ReadLine();
      exiting = true;
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Caught an exception");
   }
}

static void DemoThread()
{
   for(int i = 5; i >= 0; i--)
   {
      Console.Write("24/{0} =", i);
      Console.Out.Flush();
      Console.WriteLine("{0}", 24 / i);
      System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
      if (exiting) return;
   }
}

You can receive notification of when another thread throws an exception to perform some clean up before the application exits, but as far as I can tell, you cannot, from a console application, force the application to continue running if you do not handle the exception on the thread from which it is thrown without using some obscure compatibility options to make the application behave like it would have with .NET 1.x. This code demonstrates how the main thread can be notified of exceptions coming from other threads, but will still terminate unhappily:

static bool exiting = false;

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   try
   {
      System.Threading.Thread demo = new System.Threading.Thread(DemoThread);
      AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += new UnhandledExceptionEventHandler(CurrentDomain_UnhandledException);
      demo.Start();
      Console.ReadLine();
      exiting = true;
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Caught an exception");
   }
}

static void CurrentDomain_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Notified of a thread exception... application is terminating.");
}

static void DemoThread()
{
   for(int i = 5; i >= 0; i--)
   {
      Console.Write("24/{0} =", i);
      Console.Out.Flush();
      Console.WriteLine("{0}", 24 / i);
      System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
      if (exiting) return;
   }
}

So in my opinion, the cleanest way to handle it in a console application is to ensure that every thread has an exception handler at the root level:

static bool exiting = false;

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   try
   {
      System.Threading.Thread demo = new System.Threading.Thread(DemoThread);
      demo.Start();
      Console.ReadLine();
      exiting = true;
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Caught an exception");
   }
}

static void DemoThread()
{
   try
   {
      for (int i = 5; i >= 0; i--)
      {
         Console.Write("24/{0} =", i);
         Console.Out.Flush();
         Console.WriteLine("{0}", 24 / i);
         System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
         if (exiting) return;
      }
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Caught an exception on the other thread");
   }
}
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You also need to handle exceptions from threads:

static void Main(string[] args) {
Application.ThreadException += MYThreadHandler;
}

private void MYThreadHandler(object sender, Threading.ThreadExceptionEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(e.Exception.StackTrace);
}

Whoop, sorry that was for winforms, for any threads you're using in a console application you will have to enclose in a try/catch block. Background threads that encounter unhandled exceptions do not cause the application to end.

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so thanks for the drive by downvote, 2.5 years later? WTF? Care to comment? –  BlackICE Feb 14 '13 at 7:58
    
great, another one with no comment, wth people, at least comment when you downvote. –  BlackICE Aug 1 '13 at 18:11
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What you are trying should work according to the MSDN doc's for .Net 2.0. You could also try a try/catch right in main around your entry point for the console app.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        // Start Working
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Output/Log Exception
    }
    finally
    {
        // Clean Up If Needed
    }
}

And now your catch will handle anything not caught (in the main thread). It can be graceful and even restart where it was if you want, or you can just let the app die and log the exception. You woul add a finally if you wanted to do any clean up. Each thread will require its own high level exception handling similar to the main.

Edited to clarify the point about threads as pointed out by BlueMonkMN and shown in detail in his answer.

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Exceptions can actually still be thrown outside of the Main() block, unfortunately. This isn't actually a "catch all" like you might think. See @Hans' answer. –  Mike Atlas Jun 28 '10 at 16:18
    
@Mike First I said the way he is doing it is correct, and that he could try a try/catch in the main. I am not sure why you(or someone else) gave me a vote down when I was agreeing with Hans just providing another answer that I wasn't expecting to get a check for. That is not really fair, and then to say the alternative is wrong without providing any proof as to how an exception that can be caught by the AppDomain UnhandledException process that a try/catch in Main can't catch. I find it rude to say something is wrong without proving why it is wrong, just saying it is so, doesn't make it so. –  Rodney Foley Jun 28 '10 at 17:22
2  
I have posted the example you are asking for. Please be responsible and remove your irrelevant down votes from Mike's old answers if you haven't. (No personal interest, just don't like seeing such abuse of the system.) –  BlueMonkMN Jun 29 '10 at 0:22
2  
Yet you still play the same "game" he does, only in a worse way because it's pure retaliation, not based on the quality of an answer. That's not a way to solve the problem, only make it worse. It's especially bad when you retaliate against someone who even had a legitimate concern about your answer (as I have demonstrated). –  BlueMonkMN Jun 29 '10 at 11:32
2  
Oh, I would also add that down-voting is not intended for people who are "being a complete idiot or violating the rules", but rather to judge the quality of an answer. It seems to me that down-voting answers in order to "comment" on the person providing them is a much bigger abuse than down-voting answers based on the content of the answer itself regardless of whether that vote is accurate or not. Don't take/make it so personal. –  BlueMonkMN Jun 29 '10 at 12:55
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