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In perl, I'm trying to build up a hash of a list of lists. It looks something like this:

my %entries;
while(<>)
{
    if(/complicated regex ommitted/)
    {
        my @entry = ($2, $3, $4);
        if(exists $entries{$1})
        {
            push @{$entries{$1}}, @entry;
        }
        else
        {
            $entries{$1} = @entry;
        }
}

The resulting hash has all of the keys I expect, but the value "list of lists" isn't being built up correctly. What am I doing wrong?

Edit: Maybe there is something wrong with how I'm trying to access the resulting hash.. Here is that code

foreach $key (keys %entries)
{
    my $size = {@entries{$key}};
    # just says "HASH(0xaddress)"?
    print "$key: $size\n"; 
    foreach(@{entries{$key}})
    {
        # loop just goes through once, prints out just " : "
        print "\t$_[0]: $_[1] $_[2]\n";
    }
}   
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3  
When manipulating complex data structures with Perl, adding use warnings; and use strict; near the top of your code will help you catch mistakes. –  Greg Bacon Jun 28 '10 at 18:46
2  
...and use strict; use warnings is a strongly-recommended practice even when you're not manipulating complex data structures. –  Dave Sherohman Jun 29 '10 at 8:31
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perl has a feature called autovivification that makes scaffolding spring to life when you need it. This keeps your code simple:

my %entries;
while(<>)
{
    if (/complicated regex ommitted/)
    {
        my($key,@entry) = ($1, $2, $3, $4);
        push @{ $entries{$key} }, \@entry;
    }
}

There's no need to check whether this is the first group of entries for a given key.

To dump the contents of %entries, use code that resembles

foreach my $key (sort keys %entries)
{
    my $n = @{ $entries{$key} };
    print "$key ($n):\n";

    foreach my $l (@{ $entries{$key} })
    {
        print "\t$l->[0]: $l->[1] $l->[2]\n";
    }
}
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Thanks! One question on the output though, instead of printing out the elements of individual entries, it's printing out ARRAY(0xaddress). Any idea why? –  tjm2001 Jun 28 '10 at 18:45
    
@tjm2001 See my updated answer. I missed the bit about the values being lists of lists and expected them to be flat lists. –  Greg Bacon Jun 28 '10 at 18:48
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You're pushing a list, rather than a listref. Try:

push @{$entries{$1}}, \@entry;

(You don't need to check for the existence of the field first.. if it didn't already exist, it will be created when you push to it, through the wonders of autovivication.)

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Uh, should that not be (\@entry) in the else case? –  Svante Jun 28 '10 at 18:24
    
I tried changing to listrefs (including making the else an explict list) but still getting the same result. I suspect maybe my code to iterate over the elements is at fault then? –  tjm2001 Jun 28 '10 at 18:29
    
@Svante: I've updated my answer to take advantage of autovivication. –  Ether Jun 28 '10 at 18:36
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You need to push a reference onto the list, otherwise the lists just get appended so that you get a simple list (see the manual on push). "List of list" is always a "list of references to lists" in Perl.

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while ( <> ) {

if ( / (r) (e) (g) (e) x /x ) {
    push @{ $entry{ $1 } }, [ $2, $3, $4 ];
}
}

or in 1 line:

/(r)(e)(g)(e)x/ and push @{$entry{$1}}, [$2, $3, $4] while <>;

and to show them:

use Data::Dumper;

print Dumper \%entry;
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