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I would like to input a string and return a regular expression that can be used to describe the string's structure. The regex will be used to find more strings of the same structure as the first.

This is intentionally ambiguous because I will certainly miss a case that someone in the SO community will catch.

Please post any and all possible ways to do this.

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4  
Humans can't even do this all that well (just look at some of the horribly presented regex questions on stackoverflow) and we're supposed to be good at detecting patterns. I doubt that this can be done unless you have quite a sophisticated AI with a large training data set perhaps. Hardly anything useful can come out of just one input string, though. –  polygenelubricants Jun 28 '10 at 19:42
    
@polygenelubricants The idea is to use these patterns in training the AI. –  smothers Jun 28 '10 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

The trivial answer, and probably not what you want, is: return the input string (with regex special characters escaped). That is always a regular expression that matches the string.

If you wish certain structures to be identified, you have to provide more information about the kind of structures you wish to have identified. Without that information, the problem is stated in an ambiguous way and there are many possible solutions. For instance, the input string 'aba' can be described as

'aba'

'aba*'

'aba?'

'ab\w'

'\w{3}'

'(.)b\1'

etc.

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7  
Even worse, the input 'aba' can be most simply described as /.*/ — as can any other string. –  Chuck Jun 28 '10 at 20:00
    
@Chuck - except "\n". You probably meant /.*/s. –  Adrian Jun 28 '10 at 21:38
    
@Adrian: Or just // –  Lars Haugseth Jun 28 '10 at 22:27

Sorry for the length of this. I took the premise of this as a little challenge and came up with a proof of concept in Ruby.

I worked on the assumption that you could supply a number of strings that should match the regular expression (HITS) and a number that should fail to match (MISSES).

I based the code on a naive implementation of a genetic algorith. See the notes at the bottom for my thoughts on the success, or otherwise, of this approach.

LOOP_COUNT = 100

class Attempt

  # let's try email
  HITS    = %w[j@j.com j@j.co.uk gates@microsoft.com sales@microsoft.com sjobs@apple.com sales@apple.com frddy@aol.com thing1@charity.org sales@mybad.org.uk thing.one@drseuss.com]
  MISSES  = %w[j@j j@j@.com j.com @domain.com nochance eric@google. eric@google.com. username-at-domain-dot-com linux.org eff.org microsoft.com sjobs.apple.com www.apple.com]

  # odd mixture of numbers and letters, designed to confuse
  # HITS = %w[a123 a999 a600 a545 a100 b001 b847 a928 c203]
  # MISSES = %w[abc def ghi jkl mno pqr stu vwx xyz h234 k987]

  # consonants versus vowels
  # HITS = %w[bcd cdb fgh ghf jkl klj mnp npm qrs srq tvw vwt xzb bzx]
  # MISSES = %w[aei oyu oio euu uio ioe aee ooo]

  # letters < 11 chars and no numbers
  # HITS = %w[aaa aaaa abaa azaz monkey longstring stringlong]
  # MISSES = %w[aa aa1 aa0 b9b 6zz longstringz m_m ff5 666 anotherlongstring]

  MAX_SUCCESSES = HITS.size + MISSES.size

  # Setup the various Regular Expression operators, etc..
  RELEMENTS = %w[. ? * + ( ) \[ \] - | ^ $ \\ : @ / { }]
  %w[A b B d D S s W w z Z].each do |chr|
    RELEMENTS << "\\#{chr}"
  end
  %w[alnum alpha blank cntrl digit lower print punct space upper xdigit].each do |special|
    RELEMENTS << "[:#{special}:]"
  end
  ('a'..'z').each do |chr|
    RELEMENTS << chr
  end
  ('A'..'Z').each do |chr|
    RELEMENTS << chr
  end
  (0..9).each do |chr|
    RELEMENTS << chr.to_s
  end

  START_SIZE = 8

  attr_accessor :operators, :successes

  def initialize(ary = [])
    @operators = ary
    if ary.length < 1
      START_SIZE.times do
        @operators << random_op
      end
    end
    @score = 0
    @decay = 1
    make_regexp
  end

  def make_regexp
    begin
      @regexp = Regexp.new( @operators.join("") )
    rescue
      # "INVALID Regexp"
      @regexp = nil
      @score = -1000
    end
  end

  def random_op
    RELEMENTS[rand(RELEMENTS.size)]
  end

  def decay
    @decay -= 1
  end

  def test
    @successes = 0
    if @regexp
      HITS.each do |hit|
        result = (hit =~ @regexp)
        if result != nil
          reward
        end
      end
      MISSES.each do |miss|
        result = (miss =~ @regexp)
        if result == nil
          reward
        end
      end
    end
    @score = @successes
    self
  end

  def reward
    @successes += 1
  end

  def cross other
    len = size
    olen = other.size
    split = rand(len)
    ops = []
    @operators.length.times do |num|
      if num < split
        ops << @operators[num]
      else
        ops << other.operators[num + (olen - len)]
      end
    end
    Attempt.new ops
  end

  # apply a random mutation, you don't have to use all of them
  def mutate
    send [:flip, :add_rand, :add_first, :add_last, :sub_rand, :sub_first, :sub_last, :swap][rand(8)]
    make_regexp
    self
  end

  ## mutate methods
  def flip
    @operators[rand(size)] = random_op
  end
  def add_rand
    @operators.insert rand(size), random_op
  end
  def add_first
    @operators.insert 0, random_op
  end
  def add_last
    @operators << random_op
  end
  def sub_rand
    @operators.delete_at rand(size)
  end
  def sub_first
    @operators.delete_at 0
  end
  def sub_last
    @operators.delete_at size
  end
  def swap
    to = rand(size)
    begin
      from = rand(size)
    end while to == from
    @operators[to], @operators[from] = @operators[from], @operators[to]
  end

  def regexp_to_s
    @operators.join("")
  end

  def <=> other
    score <=> other.score
  end

  def size
    @operators.length
  end

  def to_s
    "#{regexp_to_s} #{score}"
  end

  def dup
    Attempt.new @operators.dup
  end

  def score
    if @score > 0
      ret = case
      when (size > START_SIZE * 2)
        @score-20
      when size > START_SIZE
        @score-2
      else
        @score #+ START_SIZE - size
      end
      ret + @decay
    else
      @score + @decay
    end
  end

  def == other
    to_s == other.to_s
  end

  def stats
    puts "Regexp #{@regexp.inspect}"
    puts "Length #{@operators.length}"
    puts "Successes #{@successes}/#{MAX_SUCCESSES}"
    puts "HITS"
    HITS.each do |hit|
      result = (hit =~ @regexp)
      if result == nil
        puts "\tFAIL #{hit}"
      else
        puts "\tOK #{hit} #{result}"
      end
    end
    puts "MISSES"
    MISSES.each do |miss|
      result = (miss =~ @regexp)
      if result == nil
          puts "\tOK #{miss}"
        else
          puts "\tFAIL #{miss} #{result}"
      end
    end
  end

end

$stderr.reopen("/dev/null", "w") # turn off stderr to stop streams of bad rexexp messages

# find some seed attempt values
results = []
10000.times do
  a = Attempt.new
  a.test
  if a.score > 0
    # puts "#{a.regexp_to_s} #{a.score}"
    results << a
  end
end

results.sort!.reverse!

puts "SEED ATTEMPTS"
puts results[0..9]

old_result = nil

LOOP_COUNT.times do |i|
  results = results[0..9]
  results.map {|r| r.decay }
  3.times do
    new_results = results.map {|r| r.dup.mutate.test}
    results.concat new_results
    new_results = results.map {|r| r.cross( results[rand(10)] ).test }
    results.concat new_results
  end
  new_results = []
  20.times do
    new_results << Attempt.new.test
  end
  results.concat new_results
  results.sort!.reverse!
  if old_result != results[0].score
    old_result = results[0].score
  end
  puts "#{i}   #{results[0]}"
end
puts "\n--------------------------------------------------"
puts "Winner! #{results[0]}"
puts "--------------------------------------------------\n"
results[0].stats

Lessons learned from playing with this code.

Overall, it appears that running shorter loops several times is most likely to produce a usable result. However, this may be due to my implementation rather than the nature of genetic algorithms.

You may get results that work but still contain parts that are gibberish.

You are going to need a pretty firm grasp of regular expressions to understand how many of the results actually achieve what they do.

Ultimately your time is probably much better spent learning Regular Expressions than trying to use this code as a shortcut. I realise that the questioner may not have had that motive and the reason I tried this was because it was an interesting idea.

There are many trade-offs in the results. The more diverse HITS and MISSES you supply, the longer it will take to produce a result and the more loops you will have to run. Having less of each will likely produce a result that is either massively specific to your supplied strings or so generic that it wouldn't be useful in a real world situation.

I have also hard-coded some assumptions, such as marking down expressions which get too long.

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Very clever. I've wanted a tool that could generate a regular expression to describe the differences in inputs, but never got much further than Confusion's first answer "return the string". Like you, I'm not sure the tool is really worth it, but it was fun reading all the same. :) –  sarnold Oct 4 '11 at 22:11

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