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I would like to run code alternatively, so I could stop execution at any moment. Is this code safe?

static class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var foo = new Foo();
        //wait for interaction (this will be GUI app, so eg. btnNext_click)
        foo.Continue();
        //wait again etc.
        foo.Continue();
        foo.Continue();
        foo.Continue();
        foo.Continue();
        foo.Continue();
    }
}

class Foo
{
    public Foo()
    {
        new Thread(Run).Start();
    }

    private void Run()
    {
        Break();
        OnRun();
    }

    protected virtual void OnRun()
    {
        for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
            Break();
        }
        //do something else and break;
    }

    private void Break()
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            Monitor.Pulse(this);
            Monitor.Wait(this);
        }
    }

    public void Continue()
    {
        lock (this)
        {
            Monitor.Pulse(this);
            Monitor.Wait(this);
        }
    }
}

Of course I know, that now the application will never ends, but that's not the point.

I need this, because I would like to present steps in some kind of an algorithm and describe what is going on in particular moment, and making everything in one thread would lead to many complications even when using small amount of loops in the code. For example those lines:

for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
    Break();
}

should be then replaced with:

if (this.i < 5)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i++);
}

And that is just a small example of what I want to present. The code will be more complicated than a dummy for loop.

share|improve this question
    
This is weird. Just don't use a thread. – Hans Passant Jun 28 '10 at 21:06
    
@Hans Passant: How would you do this kind of... self explaining (?) code? Inside of OnRun I would like to run graph related algorithms and show user explanation of what is going on in this moment eg. with messages and vertices/edges colouring. Splitting such a thing to small pieces would be painful to code. – prostynick Jun 28 '10 at 21:19
    
The way you have worded the question makes it seem like you are not familiar with the UI threading model for Windows Forms. You should explain what cannot be done with eventing that needs to "alternate" with some separate background thread. – David Jun 28 '10 at 21:20
    
@David, you cannot pause code execution and wait for user to press the button, and after that resume code execution in the middle of some method. – prostynick Jun 28 '10 at 21:31
1  
Also I don't think another bloated framework is in order here as setting this type of code up is relatively simple. See my answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/3136039/… – ChaosPandion Jun 28 '10 at 22:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I recommend you check out this blog post about implementing fibers.

Code (In case the site goes down.)

public class Fiber
{
    private readonly Stack<IEnumerator> stackFrame = new Stack<IEnumerator>();
    private IEnumerator currentRoutine;

    public Fiber(IEnumerator entryPoint)
    {
        this.currentRoutine = entryPoint;
    }

    public bool Step()
    {
        if (currentRoutine.MoveNext())
        {
            var subRoutine = currentRoutine.Current
                           as IEnumerator;
            if (subRoutine != null)
            {
                stackFrame.Push(currentRoutine);
                currentRoutine = subRoutine;
            }
        }
        else if (stackFrame.Count > 0)
        {
            currentRoutine = stackFrame.Pop();
        }
        else
        {
          OnFiberTerminated(
              new FiberTerminatedEventArgs(
                  currentRoutine.Current
              )
          );
          return false;
      }

      return true;
    }

    public event EventHandler<FiberTerminatedEventArgs> FiberTerminated;

    private void OnFiberTerminated(FiberTerminatedEventArgs e)
    {
        var handler = FiberTerminated;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }
}

public class FiberTerminatedEventArgs : EventArgs
{
  private readonly object result;

  public FiberTerminatedEventArgs(object result)
  {
      this.result = result;
  }

  public object Result
  {
      get { return this.result; }
  }
}   

class FiberTest
{
  private static IEnumerator Recurse(int n)
  {
      Console.WriteLine(n);
      yield return n;
      if (n > 0)
      {
          yield return Recurse(n - 1);
      }
  }

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
      var fiber = new Fiber(Recurse(5));
      while (fiber.Step()) ;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your link. This helps me a lot. I don't really need whole class, at least now. However, the idea of using Iterator and yield keyword to break (pause) execution is wonderful. Regards – prostynick Jun 28 '10 at 23:25
    
@prostynick - No problem, good luck with your work. – ChaosPandion Jun 28 '10 at 23:28

"...this will be GUI app..."

Then you probably do not want and will not have sequential code like above in Main().

I.e. the main GUI thread will not execute a serial code like above, but generally be idle, repainting, etc. or handling the Continue button click.
In that event handler you may better use an Auto|ManualResetEvent to signal the worker to proceed.
In the worker, just wait for the event.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is so obvious, but like @Hans Passant pointed out, this is a little bit weird, and somehow I haven't thought to use just AutoResetEvent. – prostynick Jun 28 '10 at 23:22
    
@prostynick: you are welcome. – Andras Vass Jun 28 '10 at 23:32

I would suggest that any time one considers using Monitor.Wait(), one should write code so that it would work correctly if the Wait sometimes spontaneously acted as though it received a pulse. Typically, this means one should use the pattern:

lock(monitorObj)
{
  while(notYetReady)
    Monitor.Wait(monitorObj);
}

For your scenario, I'd suggest doing something like:

lock(monitorObj)
{
  turn = [[identifier for this "thread"]];
  Monitor.PulseAll(monitorObj);
  while(turn != [[identifier for this "thread"]])
    Monitor.Wait(monitorObj);
}

It is not possible for turn to change between its being checked whether it's the current thread's turn to proceed and the Monitor.Wait. Thus, if the Wait isn't skipped, the PulseAll is guaranteed to awaken it. Note that the code would work just fine if Wait spontaneously acted as though it received a pulse--it would simply spin around, observe turn wasn't set for the current thread, and go back to waiting.

share|improve this answer

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