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Here's what I'm trying to do (this code doesn't work):

class Base
{
    virtual Base *clone() { return new Base(this); }
    virtual void ID() { printf("BASE");
};

class Derived : publc Base
{
    virtual Base *clone() { return new Derived(this); }
    virtual void ID() { printf("DERIVED"); }
}

.
.
Derived d;
Base *bp = &d;
Base *bp2 = bp->clone();

bp2->ID();

What I'd like is to see "DERIVED" printed out... what I get is "BASE". I'm a long-time C programmer, and fairly experienced with C++... but I'm not making any headway with this one... any help would be appreciated.

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Showing more code, specifically all constructors of each class in this case is important. (Some can be inferred from your code, but it helps with getting more correct answers from everyone...) –  Macke Jun 28 '10 at 22:42
    
Hm. The initial code had Base bp = &d. Now it's been changed to Base* bp = &d; –  Macke Jun 28 '10 at 22:45
    
Not relevant to the question, but you'll also want virtual destructors on the classes. –  Mark Ransom Jun 28 '10 at 22:47
    
And still won't compile as there are no constructors appropriate for new Base(this) and new Derived(this) –  R Samuel Klatchko Jun 28 '10 at 22:50
    
possible duplicate of [Can I pass a pointer to a superclass, but create a copy of the child? ](stackoverflow.com/questions/3063534/…) –  Matthieu M. Jun 29 '10 at 6:36

6 Answers 6

Once all the compile errors are fixed, I ended up with this:

#include <cstdio>

class Base
{
  public:
    Base() {}
    Base(const Base&) {}
    virtual Base *clone() { return new Base(*this); }
    virtual void ID() { printf("BASE"); }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  public:
    Derived() {}
    Derived(const Derived&) {}
    virtual Base *clone() { return new Derived(*this); }
    virtual void ID() { printf("DERIVED"); }
};


int main()
{
  Derived d;
  Base *bp = &d;
  Base *bp2 = bp->clone();

  bp2->ID();
}

Which gives you what you are looking for -- DERIVED.

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Thank you all for your time. Studying this example, I think I understand the issue. –  wanlessv Jun 28 '10 at 23:29

That code is riddled with syntactical errors. Perhaps most significantly, Derived doesn't inherit from Base. Secondly, aside from the syntactical errors (probably simple typos), Base obviously needs a virtual destructor. The clone method pretty much demands that you can call operator delete on a base pointer (Base*).

class Base
{
public:
    virtual ~Base() {}
    virtual Base* clone() const { return new Base(*this); }
    virtual void ID() const { printf("BASE"); }
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
    // [Edit] Changed return type to Derived* instead of Base*.
    // Thanks to Matthieu for pointing this out. @see comments below.
    virtual Derived* clone() const { return new Derived(*this); }
    virtual void ID() const { printf("DERIVED"); }
};

int main()
{
    Derived d;
    Base* bp = &d;

    Base* bp2 = bp->clone();
    bp2->ID(); // outputs DERIVED as expected
    delete bp2;
}
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1  
I apolgize to all... I created a simple example and posted it, trying to avoid burying everyone in the actual code... but I made several mistakes in the simple version, and before I could get back and correct them, I had several answers! At this point, I don't know which of the answers are answering my buggy example, which which still pertain to my real question... –  wanlessv Jun 28 '10 at 22:46
    
It's also better to use a smart pointer (such as boost::shared_ptr) to automatically delete bp2. –  Daniel James Jun 28 '10 at 22:59
2  
@Nathan That's not exactly right. Deleting through a polymorphic base pointer, regardless of whether subclasses have non-PODs as members, invokes undefined behavior according to Sutter. A base class dtor should either be public and virtual or protected and nonvirtual to avoid this. Granted we might be able to get away with it when Derived stores no PODs and has no destructor of its own, but it's still invoking undefined behavior. If Derived were to define a dtor of its own, deleting through Base* would fail to invoke the function. –  stinky472 Jun 29 '10 at 1:20
1  
With a base class essentially implementing the prototype pattern with a clone method, the code pretty much demands we have a public virtual dtor regardless of how subclasses are implemented at the moment. Doing otherwise is prone to undefined behavior-inducing, fragile code that's wrought with danger. –  stinky472 Jun 29 '10 at 1:22
1  
@Mattieu edit Nevermind, that actually compiles fine for me on MSVC and Comeau. I had mismatching constness trying to write out code in one line. I learn new things every day! So, we can override any function which accepts/returns Base*/Base& with a function which accepts/returns Derived*/Derived& instead? That does seem prone to more efficient code when we're using Derived directly and not working through a base ptr. –  stinky472 Jun 29 '10 at 6:55

With Base bp = &d;

You've "sliced" d, so to the compiler, bp really is only of type Base, which is why when you call bp->clone() the compiler calls Base::clone(); and bp2->ID() prints BASE.

Base& bp = d; will do what you want.

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You're slicing the class in Base bp = &d; (this constructs a new base bp from the derived-ptr.)

Try Base* bp = &d; instead. (i.e. create a pointer of Base type to the Derived object.)

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1  
I don't see an edit statement on the OP (at this time), and the code is already doing as you suggest (albeit it does not compile at all). While the reported issue certainly does reek of a slicing issue, the posted code does not demonstrate it... Edit: Oops, I was looking at the wrong post for the edit mark. You are correct, Marcus. Sorry for the trouble. –  Nathan Ernst Jun 29 '10 at 1:04

Your example is incorrect and will not compile. Specifically this line:

Base bp = &d;

That may also be the root cause of your problem (you may be slicing your object), but I can't tell for certain without seeing working code.

You also have a problem where your two classes are not related (did you mean to write class Derived : public Base?)

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Yes, I know this code won't compile. I fixed this bug within a minute of posting it, but you guys are fast! Please see the corrected question. I don't know what "slicing" is, but I'm looking it up... –  wanlessv Jun 28 '10 at 22:43
1  
@wanlessv - you should always make sure your code compiles before posting a question. Without knowing exactly what you are trying to do, we can't always see what the problem is. –  R Samuel Klatchko Jun 28 '10 at 22:46

The code looks fine, other than the silly syntax typos and the missing ctors.

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