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I haven't had the need to do this before but I want to send a list of IDs in for a query string value in ASP.NET:

?ListOfIDs=1234;3224;&SecondParam=somevalue&ThirdParam=....

I don't think you can add ; or commas right? I couldn't really find a good reference talking about what you can or can't pass in a url.

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How many are we talking about here? There are length concerns with a GET request :) –  Nick Craver Jun 29 '10 at 3:32
    
Not many. At most prob around 5 –  CoffeeAddict Jun 29 '10 at 3:34
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There is no better authority than the spec! It is always correct by definition.

From the spec (RFC 3986- http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#section-3.4) the query string is defined as: query = *( pchar / "/" / "?" ) pchar = unreserved / pct-encoded / sub-delims / ":" / "@" unreserved = ALPHA / DIGIT / "-" / "." / "_" / "~" sub-delims = "!" / "$" / "&" / "'" / "(" / ")" / "*" / "+" / "," / ";" / "="

Once you piece that all together, you have the answer to your question: Yes, it is perfectly fine to have commas or semi-colons (they are sub-delims).

The query string itself ends at the end of the URI or at the # character (if a URI fragment is present): URI = scheme ":" hier-part [ "?" query ] [ "#" fragment ]

As far as what your web framework understands when it parses that query string, that is another matter! Perhaps someone else has the answer for how .NET passes an array in the query string?

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awesome! did not see this ever. Nice! I've already got the parsing code done so no issue there. –  CoffeeAddict Jun 29 '10 at 3:52
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