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Can someone please show me and example of an abstract class in Java? Something with a real world application (rather than a text-book sample) would be preferable.

Thanks!

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what do you mean by a 'real time example'? –  akf Jun 29 '10 at 3:55
    
@akf, I think he meant real world. –  Mike Sherov Jun 29 '10 at 3:58
    
@Mike Sherov: Ha! I made the edit, and when I came back your comment was there. I agree with your interpretation and have edited accordingly. Probably still a dupe, however. :) –  Esteban Araya Jun 29 '10 at 4:00
    
@akf - its a common mistake made by people whose first language is not English. He probably means "real life". –  Stephen C Jun 29 '10 at 4:02
    
Got it. I've added an example for posterity. Nice edit, by the way. –  akf Jun 29 '10 at 11:03

5 Answers 5

Read this Tutorial on Abstract Methods and Classes.

First, you declare an abstract class, GraphicObject, to provide member variables and methods that are wholly shared by all subclasses, such as the current position and the moveTo method. GraphicObject also declares abstract methods for methods, such as draw or resize, that need to be implemented by all subclasses but must be implemented in different ways. The GraphicObject class can look something like this:

abstract class GraphicObject {
    int x, y;
    ...
    void moveTo(int newX, int newY) {
        ...
    }
    abstract void draw();
    abstract void resize();
}

Each non-abstract subclass of GraphicObject, such as Circle and Rectangle, must provide implementations for the draw and resize methods:

class Circle extends GraphicObject {
    void draw() {
        ...
    }
    void resize() {
        ...
    }
}
class Rectangle extends GraphicObject {
    void draw() {
        ...
    }
    void resize() {
        ...
    }
}
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To build a little on this, a method of the abstract class (let's consider moveTo here), may call draw, or resize, even if the abstract class doesn't have code for them. Then the extending classes implement them in their own way, but the moveTo method is always the same for all of them. This way you keep common code in the abstract class, but can still make it behave differently in different extending classes, by moving part of the behavior in abstract methods, that children choose how to implement. –  Andrei Fierbinteanu Jun 29 '10 at 8:16

For a real-world example, why not look at java.util.AbstractCollection?

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For a real world example of an abstract class, lets take a look at AbstractTableModel. AbstractTableModel provides an implementation of the TableModel interface (for use with a JTable). TableModel defines the following methods:

public boolean isCellEditable(int rowIndex, int columnIndex);
public Class<?> getColumnClass(int columnIndex);
public int getColumnCount();
public int getRowCount();
public Object getValueAt(int rowIndex, int columnIndex);
public String getColumnName(int columnIndex);
public void addTableModelListener(TableModelListener l);
public void removeTableModelListener(TableModelListener l);
public void setValueAt(Object aValue, int rowIndex, int columnIndex);

AbstractTableModel provides a default implementation for all but three of these methods (getRowCount, getColumnCount, and getValueAt), forcing the exteding class to provide at least the implementation to define the size and provide data to the table. It also provides a good default handling of listeners, as well as a bunch of convenience methods to fire events to those listeners.

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This is a good one. –  Martin Thurau Jun 29 '10 at 11:16

I think this serves as a common real-world example:

This may be a bit further away from what you requested but lets say we are using an ORM framework like Hibernate (no need to really worry about what that is or what it means, just know that we are basically going to be inserting/updating and retrieving objects from a database).

For each table we want to insert into, we are going to have a unique database access object (DAO) to perform our set of desired database operations, but its important to note that all DAOs will be performing some similar tasks so this is where abstract classes can come to our rescue. We can declare a AbstractBaseDao class which outlines some basic operations we might need for all of our DAOs:

public class AbstractBaseDao {
    public void saveOrUpdate(Object o){
         //save or update object from database
    }

    public void loadAll(Class clazz){
        //Load all from database
    }

    public Object loadById(Class clazz, Long id){
       // Retrieve object by Id from database
    }

    // Additional common methods
}

So once again its not terribly important how those methods are implemented for this example, just realize that all DAOs need those methods and an abstract class gives us code-reuse amongst classes.

Now with our BaseDao we are free to make concrete and specific DAOs for each table that still have our desired common functionality:

public class PersonDao extends AbstractBaseDao{
     public List<People> listAllPersonsByLastName(String lastName){
         //Load people by last names from database
     }

     public List<People> listAllPersonsByBirthYear(Date date){
        //List people by birth year from database
     }
}

Now PersonDao can perform any specific tasks and we don't waste anytime rewriting code that we've already written. A nice example of code-reuse.

I think that this is a quite common example of the use of abstract classes in the industry so I hope it helps with what you were looking for.

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1  
Good example, could be better if you use Generics. public class AbstractBaseDao<T> { [...] public T loadById(Class clazz, Long id) {[...] –  Christian Kuetbach Jan 25 '11 at 16:13
    
I'm not understanding your example - your "AbstractBaseDao" is not an abstract class. How does this relate to the question? If this is just a typo and it should be an abstract class - if all the methods in AbstractBaseDao are concrete, why make the class abstract? –  SteveT Jul 16 '12 at 21:02

In java programming language, abstract classes are those that works only as the parent class or the base class.
Subclasses are derived to implement the methods inherited from the abstract class (base class). Abstract classes are not instantiated directly. First extend the base class and then instantiate (create objects). Abstract classes are generic in nature and implement to those methods that are used commonly by the subclasses with common implementation.

e.g.

abstract class A {
         public abstract abs_value();

         void show() 
                   {
                   System.out.println("This is an abstract class");
                   }
               }
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