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In Entity Framework 4, Code Only (CTP3), how do you set a default value for a property in the POCO's EntityConfiguration class?

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreatedOn { get; set; }
}

public class PersonConfiguration : EntityConfiguration<Person>
{
    public PersonConfiguration()
    {
        Property(p => p.Id).IsIdentity();
        Property(p => p.Name).HasMaxLength(100);

        //set default value for CreatedOn ?
    }
}
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1  
In case anyone wonder. I end up using 'Repository Pattern' (stackoverflow.com/questions/3175/…;, setting the default values during INSERT. It's a nice separation, since I'm thinking of moving away from EF in the future. –  Ved Apr 4 '13 at 16:01
    
+1 for "moving away from EF in the future". Wasted a lot of time I could've just coded SQL for my current app! But what are you going to use? NHibernate, is it better? –  Mzn Mar 11 at 2:46
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6 Answers 6

With the release of Entity Framework 4.3 you can do this through Migrations.

EF 4.3 Code First Migrations Walkthrough

So using your example it would be something like:

public partial class AddPersonClass : DbMigration
{
    public override void Up()
    {
        CreateTable(
            "People",
            c => new
                {
                    Id = c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true),
                    Name = c.String(maxLength: 100),
                    CreatedOn = c.DateTime(nullable: false, defaultValue: DateTime.UtcNow)
                })
            .PrimaryKey(t => t.Id);
    }

    public overide void Down()
    {
        // Commands for when Migration is brought down
    }
}
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1  
Can you use AlterColumn to successfully modify default values without dropping and recreating the column or table? –  Benjamin Jun 15 '12 at 15:34
1  
Is there a way to do this via extending EntityTypeConfiguration? For example, anything with a Guid always defaults to newsequentialid()? –  drzaus Aug 27 '12 at 21:36
    
How do you do this if the table column already exists? –  tofutim Jul 31 '13 at 0:04
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You can set the default values via the constructor for the class. Here is a class I have in my current project, using MVC3 and Entity Framework 4.1:

namespace MyProj.Models
{
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public partial class Task
{
    public Task()
    {
        this.HoursEstimated = 0;
        this.HoursUsed = 0;
        this.Status = "To Start";
    }

    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public int AssignedUserID { get; set; }
    public int JobID { get; set; }
    public Nullable<decimal> HoursEstimated { get; set; }
    public Nullable<decimal> HoursUsed { get; set; }
    public Nullable<System.DateTime> DateStart { get; set; }
    public Nullable<System.DateTime> DateDue { get; set; }
    public string Status { get; set; }

    public virtual Job Job { get; set; }
    public virtual User AssignedUser { get; set; }
}
}
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I don't think this will play nice with virtual properties, however... –  Gleno Jun 21 '11 at 1:12
8  
What if the database stored value for HoursUsed is 5.0? Will the constructor overwrite the database value? Or will it construct first and then replace the default 0 with the actual value? –  Benjamin Jun 15 '12 at 15:36
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I know this topic is going on for a while and I walked into some kind of the same issue. So far I couldn't find a solution for me that keeps the whole thing together at one place so the code is still readable.

At creation of an user I want to have some fields set by the object itself via private setters, e.g. a GUID and Creation Date and not 'polluting' the constructor.

My User class:

public class User
{
    public static User Create(Action<User> init)
    {
        var user = new User();
        user.Guid = Guid.NewGuid();
        user.Since = DateTime.Now;
        init(user);
        return user;
    }

    public int UserID { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Role> Roles { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Widget> Widgets { get; set; }

    [StringLength(50), Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [EmailAddress, Required]
    public string Email { get; set; }
    [StringLength(255), Required]
    public string Password { get; set; }
    [StringLength(16), Required]
    public string Salt { get; set; }

    public DateTime Since { get; private set; }
    public Guid Guid { get; private set; }
}

Calling code:

context.Users.Add(User.Create(c=>
{
    c.Name = "Name";
    c.Email = "some@one.com";
    c.Salt = salt;
    c.Password = "mypass";
    c.Roles = new List<Role> { adminRole, userRole };
}));
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Interesting approch –  GibboK Jul 4 '12 at 7:30
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Unfortunately you can't. http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/adonetefx/thread/a091ccd6-0ba8-4d4f-8f5e-aafabeb258e4

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2  
Code-first is still a CTP. Please write a Connect report for this, if you haven't already. –  Craig Stuntz Jun 29 '10 at 12:37
    
Actually I think it was an active design decision. Setting default values in database is a kind of step aside from code only approach. –  Yury Tarabanko Jun 29 '10 at 13:18
2  
Well, I do expect the "Code Only" means everything is configure in the codes. Manually setting the default value in the db isn't a good idea, since I need the entity framework to create the database for me using the context.CreateDatabase() function, and I don't really want to maintain both codes and db script in the same time. –  Ved Jun 30 '10 at 2:27
4  
You can consider default values to be the part of you Person class. When you set default values in the db you'll run into the following problem: those properties won't be initialized until you save your entity. It is a problem in DB First and Model First when you have generated POCOs. –  Yury Tarabanko Jun 30 '10 at 5:01
    
Do you think is a good idea adding default value in using the SavingChanges on the context? –  GibboK Jul 4 '12 at 7:13
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I'm not sure as of what version of EF this becomes available, but as of version 5 for sure you can handle this. Just set a default value of GetDate() on the column in SQL, either in TSQL or the designer, then setup your EF classes as follows:

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreatedOn { get; set; }
}

public class PersonConfiguration : EntityConfiguration<Person>
{
    public PersonConfiguration()
    {
        Property(p => p.Id).IsIdentity();
        Property(p => p.Name).HasMaxLength(100);

        this.Property(p => p.CreatedOn ).HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema.DatabaseGeneratedOption.Computed);
    }
}

Note that you don't need to make the database column nullable, or the POCO property.

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1  
I think the point is to have EF set the default value when using Code First, and not have to get into SQL and set them yourself. –  user1308743 Apr 3 '13 at 18:33
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In the case where you want SQL Server to provide a default date the way you would accomplish this is, the important part is defaultValueSql: "GETDATE()" which will set the sql server default, not just evaluate to the time the script was run (i.e. DateTime.UtcNow)

   public partial class AddPersonClass : DbMigration
    {
    public override void Up()
    {
        CreateTable(
            "People",
            c => new
                {
                    Id = c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true),
                    Name = c.String(maxLength: 100),
                    CreatedOn = c.DateTime(nullable: false, defaultValueSql: "GETDATE()")
                })
            .PrimaryKey(t => t.Id);
    }

    public overide void Down()
    {
        // Commands for when Migration is brought down
    }
}
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