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I need to to write a Java code that checks whether the user inputed number is in the Fibonacci sequence.

I have no issue writing the Fibonacci sequence to output, but (probably because its late at night) I'm struggling to think of the sequence of "whether" it is a Fibonacci number. I keep starting over and over again. Its really doing my head in.

What I currently have is the nth.

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    ConsoleReader console = new ConsoleReader();

    System.out.println("Enter the value for your n: ");
    int num = (console.readInt());
    System.out.println("\nThe largest nth fibonacci: "+fib(num));
    System.out.println();
}

static int fib(int n){
    int f = 0;
    int g = 1;
    int largeNum = -1;
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
      if(i == (n-1))
          largeNum = f;
      System.out.print(f + " ");
      f = f + g;
      g = f - g;
    }
    return largeNum;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What exactly are you trying to do? get the n'th fibonacci number? get the next fibonacci number which is larger than n? find out if n is a fibonacci number? –  shoosh Jun 29 '10 at 10:09
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/2432669/…. –  kennytm Jun 29 '10 at 10:10
    
Wow, looking at the comments there's a lot of argument over which solution is the best from an algorithmic standpoint. But remember that this is homework, and judging from the code, it's not exactly an advanced algorithms course. What's probably desired is the easiest code to understand. @Emily, did your instructor give you any direction as to how you are expected to solve this problem? –  Daniel Pryden Jul 1 '10 at 23:05
    
See here for fast answers using only plus, minus and multiplication: stackoverflow.com/questions/5162780 –  Thomas Ahle Jun 15 '14 at 10:50

12 Answers 12

Read the section titled "recognizing fibonacci numbers" on wikipedia.

Alternatively, a positive integer z is a Fibonacci number if and only if one of 5z^2 + 4 or 5z^2 − 4 is a perfect square.[17]

Alternatively, you can keep generating fibonacci numbers until one becomes equal to your number: if it does, then your number is a fibonacci number, if not, the numbers will eventually become bigger than your number, and you can stop. This is pretty inefficient however.

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1  
Just curious, how big does this number have to be before it is more inefficient than a square root operation? –  Chris J Jun 29 '10 at 10:19
2  
@Chris J - good question. Generating the first n fibonacci numbers is an O(n) time operation. Extracting the square root of z is O(log z). I'm inclined to say that for n big enough for the fibonacci numbers to require big ints, the square root is faster, but I'm not sure. –  IVlad Jun 29 '10 at 10:25
    
subsequent values in the Fibonacci sequence approach a very particular ratio (the Golden one). therefore, they can be roughly approximated as that ratio^the number of steps to reach the number (with some constant factors). i.e. log(z) ~ n log(phi) - that would indicate that taking the square root and simply counting up are pretty close. However, I think the advantage might be that one can assess the non-integer-ness of a square root (that's hand-waving, not exactly sure) in less than log(z). –  Carl Jul 1 '10 at 14:22
    
Slick Method!!! –  Venki Apr 11 '11 at 19:07
    
Holy cow good answer! As a math major I'm amazed that this could actually be true. Awesome-o. –  Eric Lindauer Oct 8 '11 at 7:14

If I understand correctly, what you need to do (instead of writing out the first n Fibonacci numbers) is to determine whether n is a Fibonacci number.

So you should modify your method to keep generating the Fibonacci sequence until you get a number >= n. If it equals, n is a Fibonacci number, otherwise not.

Update: bugged by @Moron's repeated claims about the formula based algorithm being superior in performance to the simple one above, I actually did a benchmark comparison - concretely between Jacopo's solution as generator algorithm and StevenH's last version as formula based algorithm. For reference, here is the exact code:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(1);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(1);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(10);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(10);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(100);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(100);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(1000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(1000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(10000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(10000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(100000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(100000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(1000000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(1000000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(10000000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(10000000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(100000000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(100000000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(1000000000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(1000000000);

    measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(2000000000);
    measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(2000000000);
}

static void measureExecutionTimeForGeneratorAlgorithm(int x) {
    final int count = 1000000;
    final long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        isFibByGeneration(x);
    }
    final double elapsedTimeInSec = (System.nanoTime() - start) * 1.0e-9;
    System.out.println("Running generator algorithm " + count + " times for " + x + " took " +elapsedTimeInSec + " seconds");
}

static void measureExecutionTimeForFormulaAlgorithm(int x) {
    final int count = 1000000;
    final long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) {
        isFibByFormula(x);
    }
    final double elapsedTimeInSec = (System.nanoTime() - start) * 1.0e-9;
    System.out.println("Running formula algorithm " + count + " times for " + x + " took " +elapsedTimeInSec + " seconds");
}

static boolean isFibByGeneration(int x) {
    int a=0;
    int b=1;
    int f=1;
    while (b < x){
        f = a + b;
        a = b;
        b = f;
    }
    return x == f;
}

private static boolean isFibByFormula(int num) {
    double first = 5 * Math.pow((num), 2) + 4;
    double second = 5 * Math.pow((num), 2) - 4;

    return isWholeNumber(Math.sqrt(first)) || isWholeNumber(Math.sqrt(second));
}

private static boolean isWholeNumber(double num) {
    return num - Math.round(num) == 0;
}

The results surprised even me:

Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 1 took 0.007173537000000001 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 1 took 0.223365539 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 10 took 0.017330694 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 10 took 0.279445852 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 100 took 0.030283179 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 100 took 0.27773557800000004 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 1000 took 0.041044322 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 1000 took 0.277931134 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 10000 took 0.051103143000000004 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 10000 took 0.276980175 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 100000 took 0.062019335 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 100000 took 0.276227007 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 1000000 took 0.07422898800000001 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 1000000 took 0.275485013 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 10000000 took 0.085803922 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 10000000 took 0.27701090500000003 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 100000000 took 0.09543419600000001 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 100000000 took 0.274908403 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 1000000000 took 0.10683704200000001 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 1000000000 took 0.27524084800000004 seconds
Running generator algorithm 1000000 times for 2000000000 took 0.13019867100000002 seconds
Running formula algorithm 1000000 times for 2000000000 took 0.274846384 seconds

In short, the generator algorithm way outperforms the formula based solution on all positive int values - even close to the maximum int value it is more than twice as fast! So much for belief based performance optimization ;-)

For the record, modifying the above code to use long variables instead of int, the generator algorithm becomes slower (as expected, since it has to add up long values now), and cutover point where the formula starts to be faster is around 1000000000000L, i.e. 1012.

Update2: As IVlad and Moron noted, I am not quite an expert in floating point calculations :-) based on their suggestions I improved the formula to this:

private static boolean isFibByFormula(long num)
{
    double power = (double)num * (double)num;
    double first = 5 * power + 4;
    double second = 5 * power - 4;

    return isWholeNumber(Math.sqrt(first)) || isWholeNumber(Math.sqrt(second));
}

This brought down the cutover point to approx. 108 (for the long version - the generator with int is still faster for all int values). No doubt that replacing the sqrt calls with something like suggested by @Moron would push down the cutover point further.

My (and IVlad's) point was simply that there will always be a cutover point, below which the generator algorithm is faster. So claims about which one performs better have no meaning in general, only in a context.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Moron, it is a naive but working approach. Remember, this is homework, not a performance critical production system :-) And it may even be optimal, depending on the context (see @IVlad's comment above) - have you actually done any performance measurement to see under which circumstances the formula shown in Ivlad's answer outperforms the sequence generation? If not, what are we talking about? –  Péter Török Jul 1 '10 at 7:54
1  
@Moron, two more things about this: "downvoting is sometimes done to get the good answers to the top. Sometimes, this means downvoting all but one answer." 1) this sounds suspiciously close to tactical downvoting 2) this is a ridiculous explanation for downvoting a single answer having 1 score when the top answer has 12 ;-) Of course, feel free to downvote, I don't mind the points lost. What I do mind is shaky reasoning. –  Péter Török Jul 1 '10 at 8:06
1  
@Moron, "The point of downvoting is to get quality answers to the top" - IMO that's the point of upvoting. And if you think I was implying IVlad was the downvoter, read more carefully. –  Péter Török Jul 1 '10 at 13:12
2  
@Peter: Don't use Math.Sqrt or Math.Pow! :-) Use binary search for determining if 5f^2 +- 4 is a perfect square. Or better yet, use this: stackoverflow.com/questions/295579/… –  Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 14:17
3  
+1 for actually benchmarking instead of just guessing. –  Frerich Raabe Jul 1 '10 at 15:06

Instead of passing the index, n, write a function that takes a limit, and get it to generate the Fibonacci numbers up to and including this limit. Get it to return a Boolean depending on whether it hits or skips over the limit, and you can use this to check whether that value is in the sequence.

Since it's homework, a nudge like this is probably all we should be giving you...

share|improve this answer

Ok. Since people claimed I am just talking thin air ('facts' vs 'guesses') without any data to back it up, I wrote a benchmark of my own.

Not java, but C# code below.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace SO
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            AssertIsFibSqrt(100000000);

            MeasureSequential(1);
            MeasureSqrt(1);

            MeasureSequential(10);
            MeasureSqrt(10);

            MeasureSequential(50);
            MeasureSqrt(50);

            MeasureSequential(100);
            MeasureSqrt(100);


            MeasureSequential(100000);
            MeasureSqrt(100000);

            MeasureSequential(100000000);
            MeasureSqrt(100000000);

        }

        static void MeasureSequential(long n)
        {
            int count = 1000000;
            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                IsFibSequential(n);
            }
            DateTime end = DateTime.Now;

            TimeSpan duration = end - start;

            Console.WriteLine("Sequential for input = " + n + 
                              " : " + duration.Ticks);
        }

        static void MeasureSqrt(long n)
        {
            int count = 1000000;

            DateTime start = DateTime.Now;
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                IsFibSqrt(n);
            }
            DateTime end = DateTime.Now;

            TimeSpan duration = end - start;

            Console.WriteLine("Sqrt for input =  " + n + 
                              " : " + duration.Ticks);
        }

        static void AssertIsFibSqrt(long x)
        {

            Dictionary<long, bool> fibs = new Dictionary<long, bool>();
            long a = 0;
            long b = 1;
            long f = 1;

            while (b < x)
            {
                f = a + b;
                a = b;
                b = f;

                fibs[a] = true;
                fibs[b] = true;
            }

            for (long i = 1; i <= x; i++)
            {
                bool isFib = fibs.ContainsKey(i);

                if (isFib && IsFibSqrt(i))
                {
                    continue;
                }

                if (!isFib && !IsFibSqrt(i))
                {
                    continue;
                }

                Console.WriteLine("Sqrt Fib test failed for: " + i);
            }
        }
        static bool IsFibSequential(long x)
        {
            long a = 0;
            long b = 1;
            long f = 1;

            while (b < x)
            {
                f = a + b;
                a = b;
                b = f;
            }
            return x == f;
        }

        static bool IsFibSqrt(long x)
        {
            long y = 5 * x * x + 4;

            double doubleS = Math.Sqrt(y);

            long s = (long)doubleS;

            long sqr = s*s;

            return (sqr == y || sqr == (y-8));
        }
    }
}

And here is the output

Sequential for input = 1 : 110011
Sqrt for input =  1 : 670067

Sequential for input = 10 : 560056
Sqrt for input =  10 : 540054

Sequential for input = 50 : 610061
Sqrt for input =  50 : 540054

Sequential for input = 100 : 730073
Sqrt for input =  100 : 540054

Sequential for input = 100000 : 1490149
Sqrt for input =  100000 : 540054

Sequential for input = 100000000 : 2180218
Sqrt for input =  100000000 : 540054

The sqrt method beats the naive method when n=50 itself, perhaps due to the presence of hardware support on my machine. Even if it was 10^8 (like in Peter's test), there are at most 40 fibonacci numbers under that cutoff, which could easily be put in a lookup table and still beat the naive version for the smaller values.

Also, Peter has a bad implementation of the SqrtVersion. He doesn't really need to compute two square roots or compute powers using Math.Pow. He could have atleast tried to make that better before publishing his benchmark results.

Anyway, I will let these facts speak for themselves, instead of the so called 'guesses'.

share|improve this answer
    
Very smart point about the surprisingly small number of fib numbers below the cutoff. This thread is on fire! –  Eric Lindauer Oct 8 '11 at 7:21

A positive integer x is a Fibonacci number if and only if one of 5x^2 + 4 and 5x^2 - 4 is a perfect square

share|improve this answer
2  
do you have a reference for that formula? is that even correct? –  Chris J Jun 29 '10 at 10:14
1  
Recognising Fibonacci numbers: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  StevenH Jun 29 '10 at 10:36

If my Java is not too rusty...

static bool isFib(int x) {
    int a=0;
    int b=1;
    int f=1;
    while (b < x){
        f = a + b;
        a = b;
        b = f;
    }
    return x == f;
}
share|improve this answer

There are a number of methods that can be employed to determine if a given number is in the fibonacci sequence, a selection of which can be seen on wikipedia.

Given what you've done already, however, I'd probably use a more brute-force approach, such as the following:

  1. Generate a fibonacci number
  2. If it's less than the target number, generate the next fibonacci and repeat
  3. If it is the target number, then success
  4. If it's bigger than the target number, then failure.

I'd probably use a recursive method, passing in a current n-value (ie. so it calculates the nth fibonacci number) and the target number.

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Trying to leverage the code you have already written I would propose the following first, as it is the simplest solution (but not the most efficient):

private static void main(string[] args)
{
    //This will determnine which numbers between 1 & 100 are in the fibonacci series
    //you can swop in code to read from console rather than 'i' being used from the for loop
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        bool result = isFib(1);

        if (result)
            System.out.println(i + " is in the Fib series.");

        System.out.println(result);
    }

}

private static bool isFib(int num)
{
    int counter = 0;

    while (true)
    {
        if (fib(counter) < num)
        {
            counter++;
            continue;
        }

        if (fib(counter) == num)
        {
            return true;
        }

        if (fib(counter) > num)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
}

I would propose a more elegant solution in the generation of fibonacci numbers which leverages recursion like so:

public static long fib(int n) 
{
   if (n <= 1) 
      return n;
   else 
      return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2);
}

For the extra credit read: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#Recognizing_Fibonacci_numbers

You will see the that there are a few more efficient ways to test if a number is in the Fibonacci series namely: (5z^2 + 4 or 5z^2 − 4) = a perfect square.

//(5z^2 + 4 or 5z^2 − 4) = a perfect square 
//perfect square = an integer that is the square of an integer
private static bool isFib(int num)
{
    double first = 5 * Math.pow((num), 2) + 4;
    double second = 5 * Math.pow((num), 2) - 4;

    return isWholeNumber(Math.sqrt(first)) || isWholeNumber(Math.sqrt(second));
}

private static bool isWholeNumber(double num)
{
    return num - Math.round(num) == 0;    
}
share|improve this answer
    
As shown by Péter Török in another answer to this question, testing for a perfect square is only for sufficiently large large numbers (around 1000000000000 and beyond, in his benchmarks). Of course, it could become faster for lower values if you replace the check for whether a number is a perfect square with something more efficient. –  Frerich Raabe Jul 1 '10 at 14:53
    
@Frerich: No offense to Peter but his implementation of sqrt check sucks and is practically of no use in benchmarking. –  Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 15:09
    
@Moron, I don't claim it mine - it was copy-pasted straight from here :-) –  Péter Török Jul 1 '10 at 22:37
    
@Peter: I see. I apologize :-) –  Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 22:49
//Program begins


public class isANumberFibonacci {

    public static int fibonacci(int seriesLength) {
        if (seriesLength == 1 || seriesLength == 2) {
            return 1;
        } else {
            return fibonacci(seriesLength - 1) + fibonacci(seriesLength - 2);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        int number = 4101;
        int i = 1;
        while (i > 0) {
            int fibnumber = fibonacci(i);
            if (fibnumber != number) {
                if (fibnumber > number) {
                    System.out.println("Not fib");
                    break;
                } else {
                    i++;
                }
            } else {
                System.out.println("The number is fibonacci");
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

//Program ends
share|improve this answer

I don't know if there is an actual formula that you can apply to the user input however, you can generate the fibonacci sequence and check it against the user input until it has become smaller than the last number generated.

int userInput = n;
int a = 1, b = 1;

while (a < n) {
  if (a == n)
    return true;

  int next = a + b;
  b = a;
  a = next;
}

return false;
share|improve this answer

You can do this in two ways , the recursive and mathematical. the recursive way start generating fibonacci sequence until you hit the number or pass it the mathematical way nicely described here ... http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=252798

good luck.

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Consider the sequence of Fibonacci numbers 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21, etc. It is desired to build 3 stacks each of capacity 10 containing numbers from the above sequences as follows:

Stack 1: First 10 numbers from the sequence. Stack 2: First 10 prime numbers from the sequence. Stack 3: First 10 non-prime numbers from the sequence.

(i) Give an algorithm of the flowchart (ii) Write a program (in BASIC, C++ or Java) to implement this.

Output:As stack operations take place you should display in any convenient form the 3 stacks together with the values held in them.

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