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I want to convert a std::string to lowercase. I am aware of the function tolower(), however in the past I have had issues with this function and it is hardly ideal anyway as use with a string would require iterating over each character.

Is there an alternative which works 100% of the time?

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8  
How else would you convert each element of a list of anything to something else, without iterating through the list? A string is just a list of characters, if you need to apply some function to each character, your going to have to iterate through the string. No way around that. –  Dan Nov 24 '08 at 12:14
4  
Why exactly does this question mert down rating? I don't have a problem with iterating through my string, but I am asking if there are other functions apart from tolower(), toupper() etc. –  Konrad Nov 24 '08 at 12:24
2  
If you have a C style char array, then I guess you may be able to add ox20202020 to each block of 4 characters (provided they are ALL already uppercase) to convert 4 characters to lowercase at a time. –  Dan Nov 24 '08 at 13:05
7  
@Dan: If they might already be lowercase, but are definitely A-Z or a-z, you can OR with 0x20 instead of adding. One of those so-smart-it's-probably-dumb optimisations that are almost never worth it... –  Steve Jessop Nov 24 '08 at 13:11
4  
I don't know why it would've been down-voted... certainly it's worded a little oddly (because you do have to iterate through every item somehow), but it's a valid question –  warren Nov 24 '08 at 13:19

13 Answers 13

up vote 306 down vote accepted

From http://notfaq.wordpress.com/2007/08/04/cc-convert-string-to-upperlower-case/:

#include <algorithm>
#include <string> 

std::string data = "Abc"; 
std::transform(data.begin(), data.end(), data.begin(), ::tolower);

You're really not going to get away with not iterating through each character. There's no way to know whether the character is lowercase or uppercase otherwise.

If you really hate tolower(), here's a non-portable alternative that I don't recommend you use:

char easytolower(char in){
  if(in<='Z' && in>='A')
    return in-('Z'-'z');
  return in;
} 

std::transform(data.begin(), data.end(), data.begin(), easytolower);

Be aware that ::tolower() can only do a per-single-byte-character substitution, which is ill-fitting for many scripts, especially if using a multi-byte-encoding like UTF-8.

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2  
That is amazing, ive always wondered what the best way to do it. I had no idea to use std::transform. :) –  UberJumper Nov 24 '08 at 13:40
12  
(Old it may be, the algorithms in question have changed little) @Stefan Mai: What kind of "whole lot of overhead" is there in calling STL algorithms? The functions are rather lean (i.e. simple for loops) and often inlined as you rarely have many calls to the same function with the same template parameters in the same compile unit. –  eq- Nov 11 '11 at 22:14
2  
@eq Fair point, my benchmarks agree with you when compiling with -O3 (though the STL actually outperforms the more hand-tuned code so I'm wondering whether the compiler is pulling some tricks). Debugging STL code is still a bear though ;). –  Stefan Mai Nov 11 '11 at 23:00
21  
Every time you assume characters are ASCII, God kills a kitten. :( –  Brian Gordon Feb 10 at 20:49
3  
Your first example potentially has undefined behaviour (passing char to ::tolower(int).) You need to ensure you don't pass a negative value. –  juanchopanza May 29 at 17:30

There is a Boost string algorithm for this:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>    

std::string str = "HELLO, WORLD!";
boost::algorithm::to_lower(str);
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4  
Agreed; this is the best way to convert a string to lowercase. The documentation for to_lower is here: boost.org/doc/libs/1_37_0/doc/html/boost/algorithm/… –  MattyT Nov 24 '08 at 13:02
36  
@warren: If you don't then do. If you can't then find a way you can. There are only two valid reasons not to use Boost: 1) Your target platform is so minimal every extra byte of binary code counts (even then some parts of Boost could possibly be used). 2) You're a masochist. –  Andreas Magnusson Nov 24 '08 at 15:10
5  
@Konrad: Why? The example is good. –  phresnel Sep 29 '11 at 9:42
8  
There's another valid reason not to use boost: you're at a company that wants to minimize dependencies on any code that has any license associated with it. More licenses, no matter how liberal they may be, means more time spent in due diligence with lawyers when the company is sold. –  Almo Jul 10 '12 at 13:29
5  
@Mehrdad: Google doesn't mention slow compile times as a reason not to use boost. All google seems to object is "readability". Thumbs down for linking to something to support your argument, which has really nothing to do with your argument. Have you read Google's C++ Style Guide? –  phresnel Oct 19 '12 at 12:43

You may also want to use the C++ locale support for this. You gain genericity.

#include <functional>
#include <locale>

std::string a = "ABC";

std::transform(a.begin(), a.end(), a.begin(), 
    std::bind2nd(std::ptr_fun(&std::tolower<char>), std::locale("")));

If you have a range of writable characters, you can also do

std::use_facet< std::ctype<char> >(std::locale("")).tolower(&a[0], &a[0] + a.size());

locale("") will construct a locale object representing your preferred locale.

I recommend reading Stroustrup's Appendix D: Locales, which is freely available, and is a great insight into locales in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 the correct answer, as always. –  Mehrdad Mar 28 '13 at 6:27
    
It would be nice if you updated this answer with a C++11 version. –  daramarak Jun 28 at 12:32

Note: tolower() doesn't work 100% of the time.

Lowercase/uppercase operations only apply to characters, and std::string is essentially an array of bytes, not characters. Plain tolower is nice for ASCII string, but it will not lowercase a latin-1 or utf-8 string correctly. You must know string's encoding and probably decode it before you can lowercase its characters.

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1  
+1 Good point. For this reason exists UNICODE normalization for UTF-8, UTF-16 and UTF-32. –  Andreas Spindler Oct 9 '12 at 15:58

If the string contains UTF-8 characters outside of the ASCII range, then boost::algorithm::to_lower will not convert those. Better use boost::locale::to_lower when UTF-8 is involved. See http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_51_0/libs/locale/doc/html/conversions.html

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As far as I see Boost libraries are really bad performance-wise. I have tested their unordered_map to STL and it was average 3 times slower (best case 2, worst was 10 times). Also this algorithm looks too low.

The difference is so big that I am sure whatever addition you will need to do to tolower to make it equal to boost "for your needs" will be way faster than boost.

I have done these tests on an Amazon EC2, therefore performance varied during the test but you still get the idea.

./test
Elapsed time: 12365milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1640milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 26978milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1646milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 6957milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1634milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 23177milliseconds
Elapsed time: 2421milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 17342milliseconds
Elapsed time: 14132milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 7355milliseconds
Elapsed time: 1645milliseconds

-O2 made it like this:

./test
Elapsed time: 3769milliseconds
Elapsed time: 565milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 3815milliseconds
Elapsed time: 565milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 3643milliseconds
Elapsed time: 566milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 22018milliseconds
Elapsed time: 566milliseconds
./test
Elapsed time: 3845milliseconds
Elapsed time: 569milliseconds

Source:

string str;
bench.start();
for(long long i=0;i<1000000;i++)
{
    str="DSFZKMdskfdsjfsdfJDASFNSDJFXCKVdnjsafnjsdfjdnjasnJDNASFDJDSFSDNJjdsanjfsdnfjJNFSDJFSD";
    boost::algorithm::to_lower(str);
}
bench.end();

bench.start();
for(long long i=0;i<1000000;i++)
{
    str="DSFZKMdskfdsjfsdfJDASFNSDJFXCKVdnjsafnjsdfjdnjasnJDNASFDJDSFSDNJjdsanjfsdnfjJNFSDJFSD";
    for(unsigned short loop=0;loop < str.size();loop++)
    {
        str[loop]=tolower(str[loop]);
    }
}
bench.end();

I guess I should to the tests on a dedicated machine but I will be using this EC2 so I do not really need to test it on my machine.

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1  
Have you opened the optimization options when compiling it? I am thinking the STL heavy boost library should run better with high optimization level. –  Wei Song Aug 15 '12 at 16:16
1  
I used -O2 in one of the tests, and nothing else. –  Etherealone Aug 15 '12 at 16:18
2  
Performance of unordered_map depends the hashing algorithm combined with the data you're using. There isn't a magic hashing algorithm that works for all and any data to make the unordered_map as fast as possible. Benchmark and try different things. The reason you're getting worse performance, is because with the hash you're using you're getting a lot of collisions, which basically causes a lookup in a list. Check out this site for more info: fgda.pl/post/7/gcc-hash-map-vs-unordered-map For my purposes, the function provided at the link reduced collisions and thus was very fast. –  leetNightshade Sep 18 '12 at 15:46

This is a follow-up to Stefan Mai's response: if you'd like to place the result of the conversion in another string, you need to pre-allocate its storage space prior to calling std::transform. Since STL stores transformed characters at the destination iterator (incrementing it at each iteration of the loop), the destination string will not be automatically resized, and you risk memory stomping.

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
  std::string sourceString = "Abc";
  std::string destinationString;

  // Allocate the destination space
  destinationString.resize(sourceString.size());

  // Convert the source string to lower case
  // storing the result in destination string
  std::transform(sourceString.begin(),
                 sourceString.end(),
                 destinationString.begin(),
                 ::tolower);

  // Output the result of the conversion
  std::cout << sourceString
            << " -> "
            << destinationString
            << std::endl;
}
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I know I'm coming late to this particular party, but...


First you have to answer a question: What is the encoding of your string? Is it ISO-8859-1? Or perhaps ISO-8859-8? Or Windows Codepage 1252?

If it is UTF-8, you are already deceiving yourself into believing that you are still in control of things. Even something as simple as .length() is lying to you, .substr() is a ticking timebomb, and as soon as you try something like toupper( 'ß' ), you are in deep trouble.

Then there is the point that the standard library is depending on which locales are supported on the machine your software is running on... and what do you do if it isn't?

So what you are really looking for is something that is capable of dealing with all this correctly, and that is not std::string.

While Boost looks nice, API wise, Boost.Locale is basically a wrapper around ICU. If Boost is compiled with ICU support... if it isn't, Boost.Locale is limited to the locale support compiled for the standard library.

And believe me, getting Boost to compile with ICU can be a real pain sometimes.

So personally I would recommend getting full Unicode support straight from the horse's mouth and using the ICU library directly:

#include <unicode/unistr.h>
#include <unicode/ustream.h>

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    char const * someString = "Eidenges\xe4\xdf";
    icu::UnicodeString someUString( someString, "ISO-8859-1" );
    std::cout << someUString.toLower() << "\n";
    std::cout << someUString.toUpper() << "\n";
    return 0;
}

Compile (with G++ in this example):

g++ -Wall example.cpp -licuuc -licuio

This gives:

eidengesäß
EIDENGESÄSS

There you are. ;-)

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Using range-based for loop of C++11 a simpler code would be :

#include <iostream>       // std::cout
#include <string>         // std::string
#include <locale>         // std::locale, std::tolower

int main ()
{
  std::locale loc;
  std::string str="Test String.\n";

 for(auto elem : str)
    std::cout << std::tolower(elem,loc);
}
share|improve this answer
    
However, on a french machine, this programm doesn't convert non ASCII characters for instance : –  incises Oct 9 '13 at 8:09
2  
However, on a french machine, this program doesn't convert non ASCII characters allowed in the french language. For instance a string 'Test String123. É Ï\n' will be converted to : 'test string123. É Ï\n' although characters É Ï and their lower case couterparts 'é' and 'ï', are allowed in french. It seems that no solution for that was provided by other messages of this thread. –  incises Oct 9 '13 at 8:15
    
I think you need to set a proper locale for that. –  user1095108 Dec 30 '13 at 8:37

There is a way to convert upper case to lower WITHOUT doing if tests, and it's pretty straight-forward. The isupper() function/macro's use of clocale.h should take care of problems relating to your location, but if not, you can always tweak the UtoL[] to your heart's content.

Given that C's characters are really just 8-bit ints (ignoring the wide character sets for the moment) you can create a 256 byte array holding an alternative set of characters, and in the conversion function use the chars in your string as subscripts into the conversion array.

Instead of a 1-for-1 mapping though, give the upper-case array members the BYTE int values for the lower-case characters. You may find islower() and isupper() useful here.

enter image description here

The code looks like this...

#include <clocale>
static char UtoL[256];
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
void InitUtoLMap()  {
    for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(UtoL); i++)  {
        if (isupper(i)) {
            UtoL[i] = (char)(i + 32);
        }   else    {
            UtoL[i] = i;
        }
    }
}
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
char *LowerStr(char *szMyStr) {
    char *p = szMyStr;
    // do conversion in-place so as not to require a destination buffer
    while (*p) {        // szMyStr must be null-terminated
        *p = UtoL[*p];  
        p++;
    }
    return szMyStr;
}
// ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
int main() {
    time_t start;
    char *Lowered, Upper[128];
    InitUtoLMap();
    strcpy(Upper, "Every GOOD boy does FINE!");

    Lowered = LowerStr(Upper);
    return 0;
}

This approach will, at the same time, allow you to remap any other characters you wish to change.

This approach has one huge advantage when running on modern processors, there is no need to do branch prediction as there are no if tests comprising branching. This saves the CPU's branch prediction logic for other loops, and tends to prevent pipeline stalls.

Some here may recognize this approach as the same one used to convert EBCDIC to ASCII.

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An alternative to Boost is POCO (pocoproject.org).

POCO provides two variants:

  1. The first variant makes a copy without altering the original string.
  2. The second variant changes the original string in place.
    "In Place" versions always have "InPlace" in the name.

Both versions are demonstrated below:

#include "Poco/String.h"
using namespace Poco;

std::string hello("Stack Overflow!");

// Copies "STACK OVERFLOW!" into 'newString' without altering 'hello.'
std::string newString(toUpper(hello));

// Changes newString in-place to read "stack overflow!"
toLowerInPlace(newString);
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I tried std::transform, all i get is abominable stl criptic compilation error that only druids from 200 years ago can understand (cannot convert from to flibidi flabidi flu)

this works fine and can be easily tweaked

string LowerCase(string s)
{
    int dif='a'-'A';
    for(int i=0;i<s.length();i++)
    {
        if((s[i]>='A')&&(s[i]<='Z'))
            s[i]+=dif;
    }
   return s;
}

string UpperCase(string s)
{
   int dif='a'-'A';
    for(int i=0;i<s.length();i++)
    {
        if((s[i]>='a')&&(s[i]<='z'))
            s[i]-=dif;
    }
   return s;
}
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2  
Is also terribly unreadable and ugly. do you even know what a program is?? –  Bartek Banachewicz Jul 10 at 14:51
//You can really just write one on the fly whenever you need one.
#include <string>
void _lower_case(std::string& s){
for(unsigned short l = s.size();l;s[--l]|=(1<<5));
}
//Here is an example.
//http://ideone.com/mw2eDK
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2  
I'd say this is not a good idea. –  crashmstr Apr 19 '13 at 15:55
1  
Given that I have not downvoted, I'm not the only one to think so. Did you read the other answers regarding encoding and such? –  crashmstr Apr 19 '13 at 15:59
4  
Amongst other problems, this converts characters that are not letters (punctuation, digits, control characters) to 'lower case' which is unlikely to be the desired behaviour. For that reason alone, it is an ill-advised suggestion. There are also codesets like EBCDIC where the mapping doesn't work. And it isn't clear that the mapping works in the range 0x80..0xFF either, even for ISO 8859-n code sets. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 19 '13 at 16:12
1  
No, this algorithm only applies for lower case digits. –  user2299901 Apr 19 '13 at 16:18
4  
ASCII is no longer the default encoding. Unicode is. –  Puppy Apr 20 '13 at 7:29

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