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How do I return the index in the original list of the nth largest items of an iterable

heapq.nlargest(2, [100, 2, 400, 500, 400])

output = [(3,500), (2, 400)]

This already cost me a couple hours. I can't figure it out.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted
>>> seq = [100, 2, 400, 500, 400]
>>> heapq.nlargest(2, enumerate(seq), key=lambda x: x[1])
[(3, 500), (2, 400)]
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You can use list.index in combination with map, which is fast for small n (beware the list.index returns the index in the list of the first item whose value is x):

>>> iterable = [100, 2, 400, 500, 400]
>>> map(iterable.index, heapq.nlargest(2, iterable))
[3, 2]

To see the associated values ...

>>> map(lambda n: (n, iterable.index(n)), heapq.nlargest(2, iterable))
[(500, 3), (400, 2)]

For larger n see @SilentGhost's post.


Edit: Benchmarked some solution:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import heapq
from timeit import Timer

seq = [100, 2, 400, 500, 400]

def a(seq):
    """returns [(3, 500), (2, 400)]"""
    return heapq.nlargest(2, enumerate(seq), key=lambda x: x[1])

def b(seq):
    """returns [3, 2]"""
    return map(seq.index, heapq.nlargest(2, seq))

def c(seq):
    """returns [(500, 3), (400, 2)]"""
    map(lambda n: (n, seq.index(n)), heapq.nlargest(2, seq))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    _a = Timer("a(seq)", "from __main__ import a, seq")
    _b = Timer("b(seq)", "from __main__ import b, seq")
    _c = Timer("c(seq)", "from __main__ import c, seq") 

    loops = 1000000

    print _a.timeit(number=loops)
    print _b.timeit(number=loops)
    print _c.timeit(number=loops)

    # Core i5, 2.4GHz, Python 2.6, Darwin
    # 8.92712688446
    # 5.64332985878
    # 6.50824809074
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Great, Thanks a lot, It works –  Joey Jun 29 '10 at 10:51
    
that's not only very inefficient, it barely works –  SilentGhost Jun 29 '10 at 10:51
    
@SilentGhost, please explain. At least in a simple benchmark iterable.index seems nearly twice as fast (see my edit). –  miku Jun 29 '10 at 11:04
    
@Roque: what do your benchmark worth if you're comparing solution that works (mine) with solutions that don't (yours)? Despite linking to the index docs you haven't probably noticed very important bit there: "Return the index in the list of the first item [...]" –  SilentGhost Jun 29 '10 at 11:05
    
@Roque: well, sure, when n = 2 you see what you see, how does your "solution" performs with n = 10? –  SilentGhost Jun 29 '10 at 11:06

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