Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We need to migrate our database from MSSQL to Oracle and we have over 100 stored procedures written in PL/SQL TSQL. I know its a long shot, but has anybody ever successfully used an automatic migration tool to do the work? I've seen some tools on the web, but I have no way to judge their ability to handle various code. Any personal experience in the matter would help.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by ChrisF Aug 28 at 7:57

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – ChrisF
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
1  
"We need to migrate our database from MSSQL to Oracle and we have over 100 stored procedures written in PL/SQL." This does not make sense. If you are converting from MSSQL to Oracle, then surely your stored procedures are written in T-SQL, and you want them converted to PL/SQL... ? –  ObiWanKenobi Jun 29 '10 at 17:05
    
@ObiWan, thanks, fixed that. –  gooli Jul 1 '10 at 14:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. SwisSQL - SQL Server to Oracle Migration Tool 3.5;
  2. tsql to pl sql;
  3. Convert SQL Server T-SQL to Oracle PL/SQL (syntax and equivalences);

However, there are some optimisation that may be required to perform after the conversion is done. So, you should consider revising the conversion after it is done.

EDIT #1

Another interesting tool would be:

Spectral Core's Full Convert Enterprise

Do you have experience with any of them?

Unfortunately not. I have just performed conversions to SQL Server using SSIS.

EDIT #2

There seems to be a more appropriate tool directly from Oracle that I would better trust.

Directly from Oracle: Migrating from Microsoft SQL Server to Oracle

And the core features:

SQL Developer Migration technology supports the following core features when migrating from Microsoft SQL Server:

  • Automatically converts column data types to appropriate Oracle data types.
  • Automatically resolves object name conflicts, such as conflicts with Oracle reserved words.
  • Parses and transforms T-SQL stored procedures, functions, triggers, and views to Oracle PL/SQL.
  • Provides advanced customization capabilities such as the ability to change data type mappings, delete and rename objects.
  • Generates reports about the status of the migration.
  • Generates the DDL scripts for the creation of the destination Oracle database.
  • Generates scripts for data movement
  • Displays informational, error, and warning messages about the migration in a progress window.

    1. So, I would suggest that you look out everything in details that is not above-mentionned;
    2. Take a good look to the information details provided by the tool;
    3. Test your stored procedures after they are converted.

If you take a look as what SQL Server doesn't offer in comparison to Oracle, these are points where I would look first. In order to know these differences, follow the 3. Convert SQL Server T-SQL to Oracle PL/SQL (syntax and equivalences) link above.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have experience with any of them? How close do they come to working? Did you encounter any subtle errors I should look out for? –  gooli Jun 29 '10 at 13:09
    
Please see my edits for answers. Yet 100 stored procedures is not a lot of work to do by hand, if you're comfortable with Oracle PL/SQL. –  Will Marcouiller Jun 29 '10 at 13:47
    
The translation is not what I'm worried about, it's the testing the daunts me. But I guess there is no way to avoid that. We're probably going to write a unit test suite in Java that will be able to run against both Oracle and SQL Server and act as a regression tool. Thanks for your in-depth answer and research. –  gooli Jul 1 '10 at 14:17
    
This was a pleasure to provide you with information I searched for. I do hope this does help you along the migration. Please, let me know afterwards the practice that you have been through so that I can better learn myself. Thanks for accepting my answer, I appreciate it, sincerely. Have a good day! =) –  Will Marcouiller Jul 2 '10 at 3:01

I would suggest doing it by hand. First, to me, personally, a 100 doesn't sound too bad at all. I'd bet that your development follows patterns - using getutcdate() instead of current_timestamp, etc. This means, there probably are a few very repetitive problems that you and your team will be able to learn from. To me, this will hold the added benefit of teaching you PL/SQL nuances/extensions, which you'll probably need to learn in order to maintain / expand the new system.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Doing it by hand is the default option we were going with, but I thought I'd see if there was a simpler way. Thanks. –  gooli Jul 1 '10 at 14:14

In the past I tried to do the opposite, but I'm afraid there's no 100% reliable way. Some features are unique to each RDBMS and can't be replicated by a tool (for example IDENTITY fields in SQL Server vs Sequences in Oracle). Considering that, at the end, I had to review each Stored Procedure to ensure it does what it's supposed to do, I realized it was better to plan a manual port and learn some PL/SQL while doing it.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.