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I'm reviewing a piece of code I wrote not too long ago, and I just hate the way I handled the sorting - I'm wondering if anyone might be able to show me a better way.

I have a class, Holding, which contains some information. I have another class, HoldingsList, which contains a List<Holding> member. I also have an enum, PortfolioSheetMapping, which has ~40 or so elements.

It sort of looks like this:

public class Holding
{
    public ProductInfo Product {get;set;} 
    // ... various properties & methods ...
}

public class ProductInfo
{
    // .. various properties, methods... 
}

public class HoldingsList
{
    public List<Holding> Holdings {get;set;}
    // ... more code ...
}

public enum PortfolioSheetMapping
{
    Unmapped = 0,
    Symbol,
    Quantitiy,
    Price,
    // ... more elements ...
}

I have a method which can invoke the List to be sorted depending on which enumeration the user selects. The method uses a mondo switch statement that has over 40 cases (ugh!).

A short snippet below illustrates the code:

if (frm.SelectedSortColumn.IsBaseColumn)
{
    switch (frm.SelectedSortColumn.BaseColumn)
    {
        case PortfolioSheetMapping.IssueId:
            if (frm.SortAscending)
            {
                // here I'm sorting the Holding instance's
                // Product.IssueId property values...
                // this is the pattern I'm using in the switch...
                pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderBy
                  (c => c.Product.IssueId).ToList();
            }
            else
            {
                pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderByDescending
                  (c => c.Product.IssueId).ToList();
            }
            break;
        case PortfolioSheetMapping.MarketId:
            if (frm.SortAscending)
            {
                pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderBy
                  (c => c.Product.MarketId).ToList();
            }
            else
            {
                pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderByDescending
                  (c => c.Product.MarketId).ToList();
            }
            break;
        case PortfolioSheetMapping.Symbol:
            if (frm.SortAscending)
            {
                pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderBy
                  (c => c.Symbol).ToList();
            }
            else
            {
                pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderByDescending
                  (c => c.Symbol).ToList();
            }
            break;
        // ... more code ....

My problem is with the switch statement. The switch is tightly bound to the PortfolioSheetMapping enum, which can change tomorrow or the next day. Each time it changes, I'm going to have to revisit this switch statement, and add yet another case block to it. I'm just afraid that eventually this switch statement will grow so big that it is utterly unmanageable.

Can someone tell me if there's a better way to sort my list?

share|improve this question
    
Why is this sorting being done? Is it only for display purposes? –  Hans Passant Jun 29 '10 at 14:03
    
@Hans, the class instance is deserialized from an Excel spreadsheet containing portfolio analytics data. The actual action is invoked from an Excel toolbar button (but that's really irrelevant), and once the sort is completed, I re-serialize the objects back to the spreadsheet. The sorting actually affects various other elements in the Excel spreadsheet, so it's not purely display-only. –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 14:08
2  
Extending on my comment on Mark's answer... would it be possible for you to refactor your code to handle the data in a more database-like form to begin with? You might not even need the enum if you used a more database-style format (as you could simply add and remove the columns from your "table" as needed), so if you're willing to put in the time/effort to do such refactoring, you might end up with something more elegant, so to speak. Of course, there may be aspects of your program elsewhere that could make such an approach less feasible than it seems... –  JAB Jun 29 '10 at 14:11
    
@code4life: this isn't really related to your question, but if you're working with an Excel spreadsheet, why are you needing to extract the data from it like that? Are you unable to use COM to manipulate the data directly? –  JAB Jun 29 '10 at 14:20
    
@JAB, well the data originates from a portfolio analytics spreadsheet (Excel), so in this part of the framework, most of the classes are geared towards supporting the spreadsheet functionality. It would take significant refactoring to change that... I didn't feel mentioning that was relevant though, so I omitted that point on the outset. –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 14:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're re-assigning the sorted data straight back to your pf.Holdings property, so why not bypass the overhead of OrderBy and ToList and just use the list's Sort method directly instead?

You could use a map to hold Comparison<T> delegates for all the supported sortings and then call Sort(Comparison<T>) with the appropriate delegate:

if (frm.SelectedSortColumn.IsBaseColumn)
{
    Comparison<Holding> comparison;
    if (!_map.TryGetValue(frm.SelectedSortColumn.BaseColumn, out comparison))
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Can't sort on BaseColumn");

    if (frm.SortAscending)
        pf.Holdings.Sort(comparison);
    else
        pf.Holdings.Sort((x, y) => comparison(y, x));
}

// ...

private static readonly Dictionary<PortfolioSheetMapping, Comparison<Holding>>
    _map = new Dictionary<PortfolioSheetMapping, Comparison<Holding>>
    {
        { PortfolioSheetMapping.IssueId,  GetComp(x => x.Product.IssueId) },
        { PortfolioSheetMapping.MarketId, GetComp(x => x.Product.MarketId) },
        { PortfolioSheetMapping.Symbol,   GetComp(x => x.Symbol) },
        // ...
    };

private static Comparison<Holding> GetComp<T>(Func<Holding, T> selector)
{
    return (x, y) => Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(selector(x), selector(y));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion, definitely worth trying out. –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 14:18
    
thanks! Anecdotally the <code>.Sort</code> is slightly but definitely faster than .OrderBy().ToList(). –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 17:38
    
Nice, I was wondering how to strongly type my solution - this, is better: keep it encapsulated in the delegate. –  Douglas Jun 29 '10 at 18:40

You could try reducing the switch to something like this:

    private static readonly Dictionary<PortfolioSheetMapping, Func<Holding, object>> sortingOperations = new Dictionary<PortfolioSheetMapping, Func<Holding, object>>
    {
        {PortfolioSheetMapping.Symbol, h => h.Symbol},
        {PortfolioSheetMapping.Quantitiy, h => h.Quantitiy},
        // more....
    };

    public static List<Holding> SortHoldings(this List<Holding> holdings, SortOrder sortOrder, PortfolioSheetMapping sortField)
    {
        if (sortOrder == SortOrder.Decreasing)
        {
            return holdings.OrderByDescending(sortingOperations[sortField]).ToList();
        }
        else
        {
            return holdings.OrderBy(sortingOperations[sortField]).ToList();                
        }
    }

You could populate sortingOperations with reflection, or maintain it by hand. You could also make SortHoldings accept and return an IEnumerable and remove the ToList calls if you don't mind calling ToList in the caller later. I'm not 100% sure that OrderBy is happy receiving an object, but worth a shot.

Edit: See LukeH's solution to keep things strongly typed.

share|improve this answer
    
I was about to suggest a dictionary of comparison classes, but this is MUCH neater! –  Dr Herbie Jun 29 '10 at 14:13
    
Thanks - that helps! –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 14:19
    
thanks for the tip! This is definitely easier to code, but I think I'll go with @LukeH's suggestion to use .Sort() instead, because it's a bit faster. But conceptually the same approach as you (using a dictionary, etc etc). –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 17:39

Have you looked into Dynamic LINQ

Specifically, you could simply do something like:

var column = PortFolioSheetMapping.MarketId.ToString();
if (frm.SelectedSortColumn.IsBaseColumn)
{
    if (frm.SortAscending)
         pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderBy(column).ToList();
    else
         pf.Holdings = pf.Holdings.OrderByDescending(column).ToList();
}

Note: This does have the constraint that your enum match your column names, if that suits you.

EDIT

Missed the Product property the first time. In these cases, DynamicLINQ is going to need to see, for example, "Product.ProductId". You could reflect the property name or simply use a 'well-known' value and concat with the enum .ToString(). At this point, I'm just really forcing my answer to your question so that it at least is a working solution.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is a bad answer I think, it looks like "read this, may be it helps and I am to lazy to help you to find a solution" =) –  Restuta Jun 29 '10 at 13:54
    
Links are good they avoid redundant information. –  Michael Stoll Jun 29 '10 at 13:55
    
@Marc, thanks for the link (no pun intended), but how would this help reduce my huge switch statement? –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 13:57
1  
Wow, I go to edit my post to put something specific and the itchy triggers come out. Heaven forbid I'm a slow typer people! ;) –  Marc Jun 29 '10 at 13:58
1  
@JAB Without any explanation his answer isn't usefull, this is proved by the fact that he has edited his answer. –  Restuta Jun 29 '10 at 14:06

how about:

Func<Holding, object> sortBy;

switch (frm.SelectedSortColumn.BaseColumn)
{
    case PortfolioSheetMapping.IssueId:
        sortBy = c => c.Product.IssueId;
        break;
    case PortfolioSheetMapping.MarketId:
        sortBy = c => c.Product.MarketId;
        break;
    /// etc.
}

/// EDIT: can't use var here or it'll try to use IQueryable<> which doesn't Reverse() properly
IEnumerable<Holding> sorted = pf.Holdings.OrderBy(sortBy);
if (!frm.SortAscending)
{
    sorted = sorted.Reverse();
}

?

Not exactly the fastest solution, but it's reasonably elegant, which is what you were asking for!

EDIT: Oh, and with the case statement, it probably needs refactoring to a seperate function that returns a Func, not really a nice way to get rid of it entirely, but you can at least hide it away from the middle of your procedure !

share|improve this answer
    
@Michael fixed the original where I'd copied the wrong if, that's correct now yes? –  Ed Woodcock Jun 29 '10 at 14:09
    
It's correct, but I'd prefer IEnumerable<Holding> sorted = (frm.SortAscending) ? pf.Holdings.OrderBy(sortBy) : pf.Holdings.OrderByDescending(sortBy). This avoids the Reverse() –  Michael Stoll Jun 29 '10 at 14:24
    
@Michael I'm not sure it makes a huge difference, it seems that OrderByDescending just returns a reversed enumerator internally anyway judging by the output from Reflector, but I get your point. –  Ed Woodcock Jun 29 '10 at 14:30

It seems to me that there are two immediate improvements we can make:

  • the logic that uses frm.SortAscending to decide between OrderBy and OrderByDesccending is duplicated in every case, and can be pulled out to after the switch if the cases are changed to do nothing more than establishing the sort key and putting it in a Func

  • that still leaves the switch itself of course - and this can be replaced by a static map (in a Dictionary, say) from PortfolioSheetMapping to a Func taking a Holding and returning the sort key. eg

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, these are good suggestions, definitely helps modularize the code better. –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 14:17

You could implement a custom IComparer class which uses reflection. However this would be slower.

Here's a class, which I once used:

class ListComparer : IComparer
{
    private ComparerState State = ComparerState.Init;
    public string Field {get;set;}


    public int Compare(object x, object y) 
    {
        object cx;
        object cy;

        if (State == ComparerState.Init) 
        {
            if (x.GetType().GetProperty(pField) == null)
                State = ComparerState.Field;
            else
                State = ComparerState.Property;
        }

        if (State == ComparerState.Property) 
        {
            cx = x.GetType().GetProperty(Field).GetValue(x,null);
            cy = y.GetType().GetProperty(Field).GetValue(y,null);
        }
        else 
        {
            cx = x.GetType().GetField(Field).GetValue(x);
            cy = y.GetType().GetField(Field).GetValue(y);
        }


        if (cx == null) 
            if (cy == null)
                return 0;
            else 
                return -1;
        else if (cy == null)
            return 1;

        return ((IComparable) cx).CompareTo((IComparable) cy);

    }

    private enum ComparerState 
    {
        Init,
        Field,
        Property
    }
}

Then use it like this:

var comparer = new ListComparer() { 
    Field= frm.SelectedSortColumn.BaseColumn.ToString() };
if (frm.SortAscending)
    pf.Holding = pf.Holding.OrderBy(h=>h.Product, comparer).ToList();
else
    pf.Holding = pf.Holding.OrderByDescending(h=>h.Product, comparer).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
I'm willing to look at this - can you elaborate a bit more on how reflection would be used? Not sure how that fits in with my switch statement and the enumeration values... –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 13:58
    
However, if your framework version allows it, I'd prefer the Dynamic LINQ solution! –  Michael Stoll Jun 29 '10 at 14:19

If the properties in the Holding class (symbol, price etc) are the same type you can do the following:

var holdingList = new List<Holding>()
{
      new Holding() { Quantity = 2, Price = 5 },
      new Holding() { Quantity = 7, Price = 2 },
      new Holding() { Quantity = 1, Price = 3 }
};

var lookup = new Dictionary<PortfolioSheetMapping, Func<Holding, int>>()
{
      { PortfolioSheetMapping.Price, new Func<Holding, int>(x => x.Price) },
      { PortfolioSheetMapping.Symbol, new Func<Holding, int>(x => x.Symbol) },
      { PortfolioSheetMapping.Quantitiy, new Func<Holding, int>(x => x.Quantity) }
};

Console.WriteLine("Original values:");
foreach (var sortedItem in holdingList)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Quantity = {0}, price = {1}", sortedItem.Quantity, sortedItem.Price);
}

var item = PortfolioSheetMapping.Price;
Func<Holding, int> action;
if (lookup.TryGetValue(item, out action))
{
    Console.WriteLine("Values sorted by {0}:", item);
    foreach (var sortedItem in holdingList.OrderBy(action))
    {
         Console.WriteLine("Quantity = {0}, price = {1}", sortedItem.Quantity, sortedItem.Price);
    }
}

which then displays:

Original values:
Quantity = 2, price = 5
Quantity = 7, price = 2
Quantity = 1, price = 3

Values sorted by Price:
Quantity = 7, price = 2
Quantity = 1, price = 3
Quantity = 2, price = 5

share|improve this answer
    
I like the Func idea. The properties in the Holding class are different types, so I would have to take a modified approach from what you are suggesting, but good idea nonetheless. –  code4life Jun 29 '10 at 14:34
    
I've just seen the other answers that were posted when I was doing mine and you can change the lookup to lookup = new Dictionary<PortfolioSheetMapping, Func<Holding, object>> and this should work –  Matt Warren Jun 29 '10 at 14:43

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