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hello i want to threads to collaborate a producer and a consumer. the consumer is rather slow, and the producer is very fast and works in bursts.

for example the consumer can process one message per 20 seconds, and the producer can produce 10 messages in one second, but does it about once in a long while so the consumer can catch up.

i want something like:

Stream commonStream;
AutoResetEvent commonLock;

void Producer()
{
  while (true)
  {
    magic.BlockUntilMagicAvalible();
    byte[] buffer = magic.Produce();
    commonStream.Write(buffer);
    commonLock.Set();
  }
}

void Consumer()
{
  while(true)
  { 
    commonLock.WaitOne();
    MagicalObject o = binarySerializer.Deserialize(commonStream);
    DoSomething(o);
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
What version of .Net are you using, there are some new things to v4 for exactly this stuff –  Scott Chamberlain Jun 29 '10 at 14:35
    
.Net 3.5 ; Comments must be at least 15 characters in length. –  AK_ Jun 29 '10 at 16:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would read the following articles they describe your problem. Basically you're not getting the right isolation for your unit of work.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ricom/archive/2006/04/24/582643.aspx http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ricom/archive/2006/04/26/584802.aspx

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yeah its kinda what i wish i could write... –  AK_ Jun 29 '10 at 15:18

If you have .Net 4.0 or higher you can do it this way by using a BlockingCollection

int maxBufferCap = 500;
BlockingCollection<MagicalObject> Collection 
                           = new BlockingCollection<MagicalObject>(maxBufferCap);
void Producer()
{
    while (magic.HasMoreMagic)
    {
        this.Collection.Add(magic.ProduceMagic());
    }
    this.Collection.CompleteAdding();
}

void Consumer()
{
    foreach (MagicalObject magicalObject in this.Collection.GetConsumingEnumerable())
    {
        DoSomthing(magicalObject);
    }
}

The foreach line will sleep if there is no data in the buffer, it will also automatically wake it self up when something is added to the collection.

The reason I set the max buffer is if your producer is much faster than the consumer you may end up consuming a lot of memory as more and more objects get put in to the collection. By setting up a max buffer size as you create the blocking collection when the buffer size is reached the Add call on the producer will block until a item has been removed from the collection by the consumer.

Another bonus of the BlockingCollection class is it can have as many producers and consumers as you want, it does not need to be a 1:1 ratio. If DoSomthing supports it you could have a foreach loop per core of the computer (or even use Parallel.ForEach and use the consuming enumerable as the data source)

void ConsumersInParalell()
{
    //This assumes the method signature of DoSomthing is one of the following:
    //    Action<MagicalObject>
    //    Action<MagicalObject, ParallelLoopState>
    //    Action<MagicalObject, ParallelLoopState, long>
    Paralell.ForEach(this.Collection.GetConsumingEnumerable(), DoSomthing);
}
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2  
Note that the TPL has been back-ported to .NET 3.5: codeblog.theg2.net/2010/02/… –  Dan Bryant Jun 29 '10 at 17:24

You can get what you want using a queue and timer. The producer adds values to the queue and starts the consumer timer. The consumer timer's elapsed event (which is on a Threadpool thread) stops the timer, and loops through the queue until it's empty, then disappears (no unnecessary polling). The producer can add to the queue while the consumer is still running.

System.Timers.Timer consumerTimer;
Queue<byte[]> queue = new Queue<byte[]>();

void Producer()
{
    consumerTimer = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
    consumerTimer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(consumerTimer_Elapsed);
    while (true)
    {
        magic.BlockUntilMagicAvailable();
        lock (queue)
        {
            queue.Enqueue(magic.Produce());
            if (!consumerTimer.Enabled)
            {
                consumerTimer.Start();
            }
        }
    }
}

void consumerTimer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    while (true)
    {
        consumerTimer.Stop();
        lock (queue)
        {
            if (queue.Count > 0)
            {
                DoSomething(queue.Dequeue());
            }
            else
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
your snippet isnt thread safe... and mine implies no polling –  AK_ Jun 29 '10 at 21:05
    
What isn't thread safe about it? And it doesn't poll - the timer is a one-shot that's only activated when the producer adds to the queue. –  Ed Power Jun 29 '10 at 21:47

I use Mutex's. The idea is that both run in different threads. The Consumer thread is started locked by a mutex, where it will sit indefinitely until release by the Producer. It will then process data in parallel leaving the Producer to continue. The Consumer will re-lock when complete.

(Code start the thread, and other quality bits have been omitted for brevity.)

// Pre-create mutex owned by Producer thread, then start Consumer thread.
Mutex mutex = new Mutex(true);  
Queue<T> queue = new Queue<T>();

void Producer_AddData(T data)
{
  lock (queue) {
    queue.Enqueue(GetData());
  }

  // Release mutex to start thread:
  mutex.ReleaseMutex();
  mutex.WaitOne();
}

void Consumer()
{
  while(true)
  { 
    // Wait indefinitely on mutex
    mutex.WaitOne();
    mutex.ReleaseMutex();

    T data;
    lock (queue) {
      data = queue.Dequeue();
    }
    DoSomething(data);
  }

}

This slows the Producer by a very few milliseconds whilst is waits for the Consumer to wake and release the mutex. If you can live with that.

share|improve this answer
    
Using a BlockingCollection is much better. First off, it's much more obvious when it's correct than using mutexes, and unlike your model the producer and the consumer can be working in parallel; you are ensuring that your code is either producing or consuming, but never both. It also doesn't scale well to more than one producer or more than one consumer, unlike a blocking collection where doing so is trivial. You could use a more complex mutex based approach that had the benefits of a blocking collection, but it would be a lot of work, and be much less readable/maintainable. –  Servy Feb 15 '13 at 17:05
    
The BlockingColletion is not available to me as I cannot run 4.5. If I could then this would probably be the correct solution. However this code does run in parallel. I might not have been clear, but the two are in different threads. I use this to run heavy SQL queries on one thread, whilst gathering data on another thread and it works well for me. –  Ben Feb 15 '13 at 17:07
    
BlockingCollection was added in 4.0, not 4.5. –  Servy Feb 15 '13 at 17:08
    
This is partly why these solutions are problematic, it's non-trivial to reason about what's going on. You are correct, they can run in parallel, but because you allow that it is not thread safe. You can be removing an item from the queue at the same time that you're enqueuing a new item, which could result in all sorts of bad things happening. –  Servy Feb 15 '13 at 17:13
1  
How is it without justification? I have posted quite a few comments in which I have explained the problems with your post, and I didn't add the downvote until it seemed clear that you had no intention of fixing the problems with the post. As to your synchronization, that's something that is way to important to omit in my eyes; it's way to easy to mess up. Case in point, you didn't do it properly, you're locking on the creating of the item in the producer, thus preventing the consumer from getting an item during that processing. This could even starve out the consumer. –  Servy Feb 15 '13 at 17:27

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