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I'm just getting back into Project Euler and have lost my account and solutions, so I'm back on problem 7. However, my code doesn't work. It seems fairly elementary to me, can someone help me debug my (short) script?

Should find the 10001st Prime.

#!/usr/bin/env python
#encoding: utf-8
"""
P7.py

Created by Andrew Levenson on 2010-06-29.
Copyright (c) 2010 __ME__. All rights reserved.
"""

import sys
import os
from math import sqrt

def isPrime(num):
    flag = True
    for x in range(2,int(sqrt(num))):
        if( num % x == 0 ):
            flag = False
    if flag == True:
         return True
    else:
         return False

def main():
    i, n = 1, 3
    p = False
    end = 6
    while end - i >= 0:
        p = isPrime(n)
        if p == True:
            i = i + 1
            print n
        n = n + 1

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Edit*: Sorry, the issue is it says every number is prime. :/

share|improve this question
1  
what does error say? –  SilentGhost Jun 29 '10 at 15:45
    
-1. No. A syntax problem would be "n+*/3". When does it work? When does it not work? At what point does it diverge from intended behavior? –  user166390 Jun 29 '10 at 15:46
    
Sorry, but I laughed at "Created by Andrew Levenson on 2010-06-29. Copyright (c) 2010 ME. All rights reserved." :) No offence meant, just that this sort of primitive script was probably written by thousands of others already. –  houbysoft Jun 29 '10 at 21:16
    
No offense taken! I actually just have that there because TextMate, in the Python Script template, has that line with MyCompanyName so I just shorten it to ME every time. I assume no ownership of any of my code because it's all useless anyways. :) Except, of course, my useful bash/perl/f90 scripts that make my lab work that much easier, because then my coworkers could use it and they could bugger off. –  Andy Jun 29 '10 at 22:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The syntax is fine (in Python 2). The semantics has some avoidable complications, and this off-by-one bug:

for x in range(2,int(sqrt(num))):
    if( num % x == 0 ):
        flag = False

range(2, Y) goes from 2 included to Y excluded -- so you're often not checking the last possible divisor and thereby deeming "primes" many numbers that aren't. As the simplest fix, try a 1 + int(... in that range. After which, removing those avoidable complications is advisable: for example,

if somebool: return True
else: return False

is never warranted, as the simpler return somebool does the same job.

A simplified version of your entire code (with just indispensable optimizations, but otherwise exactly the same algorithm) might be, for example:

from math import sqrt

def isPrime(num):
    for x in range(3, int(1 + sqrt(num)), 2):
        if num % x == 0: return False
    return True

def main():
    i, n = 0, 3
    end = 6
    while i < end:
        if isPrime(n):
            i += 1
            print n
        n += 2

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

"Return as soon as you know the answer" was already explained, I've added one more crucial optimization (+= 2, instead of 1, for n, as we "know" even numbers > 3 are not primes, and a tweak of the range for the same reason).

It's possible to get cuter, e.g.:

def isPrime(num):
    return all(num % x for x n range(3, int(1 + sqrt(num)), 2))

though this may not look "simpler" if you're unfamiliar with the all built-in, it really is, because it saves you having to do (and readers of the code having to follow) low level logic, in favor of an appropriate level of abstraction to express the function's key idea, that is, "num is prime iff all possible odd divisors have a [[non-0]] remainder when the division is tried" (i.e., express the concept directly in precise, executable form). The algorithm within is actually still identical.

Going further...:

import itertools as it

def odd():
    for n in it.count(1):
        yield n + n + 1

def main():
    end = 5        
    for i, n in enumerate(it.ifilter(isPrime, odd())):
        print n
        if i >= end: break

Again, this is just the same algorithm as before, just expressed at a more appropriate level of abstraction: the generation of the sequence of odd numbers (from 3 included upwards) placed into its own odd generator, and some use of the enumerate built-in and itertools functionality to avoid inappropriate (and unneeded) low-level expression / reasoning.

I repeat: no fundamental optimization applied yet -- just suitable abstraction. Optimization of unbounded successive primes generation in Python (e.g. via an open-ended Eratosthenes Sieve approach) has been discussed in depth elsewhere, e.g. here (be sure to check the comments too!). Here I was focusing on showing how (with built-ins such as enumerate, all, and any, the crucial itertools, plus generators and generator expressions) many "looping" problems can be expressed in modern Python at more appropriate levels of abstraction than the "C-inspired" ones that may appear most natural to most programmers reared on C programming and the like. (Perhaps surprisingly to scholars used to C++'s "abstraction penalty" first identified by Stepanov, Python usually tends to have an "abstraction premium" instead, especially if itertools, well known for its blazing speed, is used extensively and appropriately... but, that's really a different subject;-).

share|improve this answer
    
Not to mention the redundant checking after Flag is false, as in my answer –  Eric Jun 29 '10 at 15:50
    
@Eric, sure, but that's extra work, not extra complication;-). if somebool == True: which the OP does often is just irrelevant extra complication, I was focusing on that right after correctness and before speed;-). –  Alex Martelli Jun 29 '10 at 15:56
    
Thanks, I didn't realize Range specified an upper bound, not an upper limit. –  Andy Jun 29 '10 at 16:37
    
Also, @Alex, the if somebool == true was more of an "I can't figure out what's wrong, I'm so exasperated I'll try anything." –  Andy Jun 29 '10 at 19:02
1  
@Andrew, you're welcome! The optimizations are, in a sense, "incremental" (except for the "return ASAP" one, which @Eric pointed out) -- they don't change the big-O behavior, "just" the multiplier. (That one, I suspect but haven't proven, lowers the "average big-O" [[kind of an oxymoron hm?-)]] a bit, as [[handwaves]] "most" composite numbers have some "small" divisor). –  Alex Martelli Jun 29 '10 at 22:45

Isn't this better?

def isPrime(num):
    for x in range(2,int(sqrt(num))):
        if( num % x == 0 ):
            return False
    return True

And this:

def main():
    i, n = 1, 3
    while i <= 6:
        if isPrime(n):
            i = i + 1
            print n
        n = n + 1

Also, I'm not seeing a 10001 anywhere in there...

share|improve this answer
    
your isPrime function has exactly the same bug as the OP's, see my answer. –  Alex Martelli Jun 29 '10 at 15:50
    
Indeed. I was just pointing out the superfluous code. I figured that it would be rude to steal your fix. –  Eric Jun 29 '10 at 15:52
    
Sorry, the '10001' was replaced by '6' for debugging purposes. –  Andy Jun 29 '10 at 19:00

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