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Is there a way to deserialize JSON content into a C# 4 dynamic type? It would be nice to skip creating a bunch of classes in order to use the DataContractJsonSerializer.

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4  
If you want something 'dynamic', why not just use the get-style accessors that come with most JSON decoders that don't go to plain-old-object? (e.g. is there really a need for 'dynamic' object creation?) json.org has a bunch of links for C# JSON implementations. –  user166390 Jun 29 '10 at 16:07
    
I'm working on a project that is trying to keep external dependencies to a minimum. So if it's possible to something with the stock .net serializers and types that would be preferred. Of course if it's not possible I'm hitting up json.org. Thanks! –  jswanson Jun 29 '10 at 16:14
20  
I'm really surprised the C# team added 'dynamic' but then there is no way in the CLR to convert a JSON object to a dynamic CLR class instance. –  Frank Schwieterman Jul 20 '10 at 23:12
2  
Unfortunately the accepted answer doesn't work in .NET 4 RTM. I posted an answer that helped me get going with this which might be useful to others. –  Drew Noakes Sep 27 '10 at 17:47
    
I posted a simplest solution below. –  Peter Long Jun 30 '11 at 23:55

17 Answers 17

up vote 241 down vote accepted

If you are happy to have a dependency upon the System.Web.Helpers assembly, then you can use the Json class:

dynamic data = Json.Decode(json);

It is included with the MVC framework as an additional download to the .NET 4 framework. Be sure to give Vlad an upvote if that's helpful! However if you cannot assume the client environment includes this DLL, then read on.


An alternative deserialisation approach is suggested here. I modified the code slightly to fix a bug and suit my coding style. All you need is this code and a reference to System.Web.Extensions from your project:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Dynamic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

public sealed class DynamicJsonConverter : JavaScriptConverter
{
    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        if (dictionary == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("dictionary");

        return type == typeof(object) ? new DynamicJsonObject(dictionary) : null;
    }

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get { return new ReadOnlyCollection<Type>(new List<Type>(new[] { typeof(object) })); }
    }

    #region Nested type: DynamicJsonObject

    private sealed class DynamicJsonObject : DynamicObject
    {
        private readonly IDictionary<string, object> _dictionary;

        public DynamicJsonObject(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary)
        {
            if (dictionary == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("dictionary");
            _dictionary = dictionary;
        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            var sb = new StringBuilder("{");
            ToString(sb);
            return sb.ToString();
        }

        private void ToString(StringBuilder sb)
        {
            var firstInDictionary = true;
            foreach (var pair in _dictionary)
            {
                if (!firstInDictionary)
                    sb.Append(",");
                firstInDictionary = false;
                var value = pair.Value;
                var name = pair.Key;
                if (value is string)
                {
                    sb.AppendFormat("{0}:\"{1}\"", name, value);
                }
                else if (value is IDictionary<string, object>)
                {
                    new DynamicJsonObject((IDictionary<string, object>)value).ToString(sb);
                }
                else if (value is ArrayList)
                {
                    sb.Append(name + ":[");
                    var firstInArray = true;
                    foreach (var arrayValue in (ArrayList)value)
                    {
                        if (!firstInArray)
                            sb.Append(",");
                        firstInArray = false;
                        if (arrayValue is IDictionary<string, object>)
                            new DynamicJsonObject((IDictionary<string, object>)arrayValue).ToString(sb);
                        else if (arrayValue is string)
                            sb.AppendFormat("\"{0}\"", arrayValue);
                        else
                            sb.AppendFormat("{0}", arrayValue);

                    }
                    sb.Append("]");
                }
                else
                {
                    sb.AppendFormat("{0}:{1}", name, value);
                }
            }
            sb.Append("}");
        }

        public override bool TryGetMember(GetMemberBinder binder, out object result)
        {
            if (!_dictionary.TryGetValue(binder.Name, out result))
            {
                // return null to avoid exception.  caller can check for null this way...
                result = null;
                return true;
            }

            result = WrapResultObject(result);
            return true;
        }

        public override bool TryGetIndex(GetIndexBinder binder, object[] indexes, out object result)
        {
            if (indexes.Length == 1 && indexes[0] != null)
            {
                if (!_dictionary.TryGetValue(indexes[0].ToString(), out result))
                {
                    // return null to avoid exception.  caller can check for null this way...
                    result = null;
                    return true;
                }

                result = WrapResultObject(result);
                return true;
            }

            return base.TryGetIndex(binder, indexes, out result);
        }

        private static object WrapResultObject(object result)
        {
            var dictionary = result as IDictionary<string, object>;
            if (dictionary != null)
                return new DynamicJsonObject(dictionary);

            var arrayList = result as ArrayList;
            if (arrayList != null && arrayList.Count > 0)
            {
                return arrayList[0] is IDictionary<string, object> 
                    ? new List<object>(arrayList.Cast<IDictionary<string, object>>().Select(x => new DynamicJsonObject(x))) 
                    : new List<object>(arrayList.Cast<object>());
            }

            return result;
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

You can use it like this:

string json = ...;

var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
serializer.RegisterConverters(new[] { new DynamicJsonConverter() });

dynamic obj = serializer.Deserialize(json, typeof(object));

So, given a JSON string:

{
  "Items":[
    { "Name":"Apple", "Price":12.3 },
    { "Name":"Grape", "Price":3.21 }
  ],
  "Date":"21/11/2010"
}

The following code will work at runtime:

dynamic data = serializer.Deserialize(json, typeof(object));

data.Date; // "21/11/2010"
data.Items.Count; // 2
data.Items[0].Name; // "Apple"
data.Items[0].Price; // 12.3 (as a decimal)
data.Items[1].Name; // "Grape"
data.Items[1].Price; // 3.21 (as a decimal)
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1  
I get an error in dynamic obj = serializer.Deserialize(json, typeof(object)); saying that no overload for method with 2 arguments..wrong dll or what? –  Stewie Griffin Jun 18 '11 at 20:17
1  
I found that your ToString method wasn't working for me, so I rewrote it. It might have some bugs, but it's working over my dataset, so I'll provide it here for anyone else who might be having trouble with this: pastebin.com/BiRmQZdz –  Quantumplation Dec 18 '11 at 13:22
7  
You can use System.Web.Helpers.Json - it offers a Decode method that returns a dynamic object. I've also posted this info as an answer. –  Vlad Feb 29 '12 at 7:30
1  
sometimes in js you have fields with special chars like "background-color". To access such fields in js you do obj["background-color"]. How can I access such fields from c# after deserializing to dynamic object? I can't do obj.background-color, of course, and obj["background-color"] doesn't seem to work. It would be nice if the dynamic object could also be accessed as a dictionary, at the same time, exactly like in js. –  Radu Simionescu Sep 28 '12 at 11:59
1  
@RaduSimionescu I am probably a bit late, but maybe this helps future visitors. I had the same problem, just with the field-name params (which is a keyword in C#). In addition to TryGetMember you can override TryGetIndex, which gives you exactly the same behavior as in JS. Then you can do obj["params"] or obj["background-color"] for awkward field names. –  Martin Büttner Jan 20 '13 at 14:30

You can do this using System.Web.Helpers.Json - its Decode method returns a dynamic object which you can traverse as you like.

It's included in the System.Web.Helpers assembly (.NET 4.0).

var dynamicObject = Json.Decode(jsonString);
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15  
FYI System.Web.Helpers.dll requires .net 4.0 but is not included in .net 4.0. It can be installed with ASP.NET MVC 3 –  jbtule Mar 30 '12 at 20:44
6  
This should be the accepted answer. Thanks! –  ECC-Dan Aug 29 '12 at 19:27
5  
You will find this assembly in the Extensions group under Assemblies in Visual Studio 2012 –  W3Max Jan 17 '13 at 13:55
1  
Any Issues with using dynamic ? How can we handle exceptions efficiently if input JSON does not contain the properties.. –  Usama Khalil Apr 15 '13 at 10:24
4  
If you're wanting to strongly type the model then be sure to use the Json.Decode<T>(string) method. –  Mike Apr 15 '13 at 20:47

It's pretty simple using Json.NET:

dynamic stuff = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject("{ 'Name': 'Jon Smith', 'Address': { 'City': 'New York', 'State': 'NY' }, 'Age': 42 }");

string name = stuff.Name;
string address = stuff.Address.City;

Also using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq :

dynamic stuff = JObject.Parse("{ 'Name': 'Jon Smith', 'Address': { 'City': 'New York', 'State': 'NY' }, 'Age': 42 }");

string name = stuff.Name;
string address = stuff.Address.City;
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5  
The best. The answer from Drew Noakes is too hard to understand and hard to use. –  Alex Veremeenko Oct 10 '13 at 13:50
    
Interesting, using MVC, how do I bind this to the view? I read through a few posts about dynamic or anonymous type bind, but I'm not seeing an example of how to use it. Say I have json that may have a lot of layers. –  Vyache Mar 23 at 2:16
    
How can you introspect the dynamic stuff? –  Hot Licks Jun 4 at 17:18
2  
@HotLicks: To introspect the dynamic stuff do something like: foreach (Newtonsoft.Json.Linq.JProperty jproperty in stuff) { Console.WriteLine("jproperty.Name = {0}", jproperty.Name);} –  Matthias Jun 15 at 20:48
    
What's the difference between JsonConvert.DeserializeObject and JObject.Parse ? The answer is using them both in the same way to do the same thing but doesn't explain the difference. –  cja Oct 8 at 16:04

.Net 4.0 has a built-in library to do this:

using System.Web.Script.Serialization;
JavaScriptSerializer jss = new JavaScriptSerializer();
var d=jss.Deserialize<dynamic>(str);

This is the simplest way.

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19  
have you tried this? It returns Dictionary<string,object>. Unless I'm missing something, your example does not return a dynamic object. –  sergiopereira Jun 13 '11 at 15:15
13  
This doesn't work, it just return a dict in the form of a dynamic –  mattmanser Jun 30 '11 at 15:56
40  
@Peter Long I believe I have failed to state my case clearly, dear fellow. Let me attempt to rectify my error. I know what a dynamic is. This doesn't allow you to pass in a JSON object and use d.code, you'd have to do d["code"].Value, which isn't what most people finding this answer want, we already know how to get the dictionary and casting it to a dynamic is a total waste of time. I respectfully disagree, sir. –  mattmanser Jul 1 '11 at 9:22
12  
@mattmanser...I already wasted those minutes trying his code cus I didn't read the comments or scrolled down :( –  Shawn Mclean Jul 13 '11 at 15:05
4  
@mattmanser, we already know how to get the dictionary and casting it to a dynamic. It does not have to be a dictionay. Json also have lists besides dictionary. And also lists and dictionaries could be nested. My code could handle all of these situations. BUT your method can NOT. –  Peter Long Jul 14 '11 at 2:44

Simple "string json data" to object without any third party dll

WebClient client = new WebClient();
string getString = client.DownloadString("https://graph.facebook.com/zuck");


JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer(); 
dynamic item = serializer.Deserialize<object>(getString);
string name = item["name"];

//note: JavaScriptSerializer in this namespaces
//System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer 

Note : You can also using your custom object.

Personel item = serializer.Deserialize<Personel>(getString);
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Id don't get it. This is by far most simple solution and nobody mentions it. –  cikatomo Feb 20 '13 at 10:27
    
yes it's simple :) sometime you need serialize but don't want to include 3rd part dll –  Tacettin Özbölük Aug 6 '13 at 11:48
    
Can you elaborate on : how dynamic can access the DEserialized object via : myObject["myprop"] ? I know it's done on runtime but how accessing it via myObject["myprop"] is valid ? –  Royi Namir Sep 19 '13 at 16:05
    
You can deserialize your object like Personel item = serializer.Deserialize<Personel>(getString); and if you use dynamic object also you can using array and everything is possible like everyobject –  Tacettin Özbölük Sep 20 '13 at 11:27
2  
this is a duplicate answer from @Peter Long –  Dexter Legaspi Feb 22 at 16:34

JsonFx can deserialize json into dynamic objects.

https://github.com/jsonfx/jsonfx

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3  
That's exactly what I was looking for last year. Thanks! –  jswanson Mar 2 '11 at 19:00
2  
Works perfectly, to dynamic/expando objects. –  Bryan Bailliache Oct 27 '11 at 18:22
1  
Works great. Package is on NuGet and it did exactly what I was expecting. Didn't get a chance to try Vlad's answer on the bottom - I like that there's nothing to install with that one. –  pettys Mar 30 '12 at 19:45

I made a new version of the DynamicJsonConverter that uses Expando Objects. I used expando objects because I wanted to Serialize the dynamic back into json using Json.net.

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Dynamic;
using System.Web.Script.Serialization;

public static class DynamicJson
{
    public static dynamic Parse(string json)
    {
        JavaScriptSerializer jss = new JavaScriptSerializer();
        jss.RegisterConverters(new JavaScriptConverter[] { new DynamicJsonConverter() });

        dynamic glossaryEntry = jss.Deserialize(json, typeof(object)) as dynamic;
        return glossaryEntry;
    }

    class DynamicJsonConverter : JavaScriptConverter
    {
        public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
        {
            if (dictionary == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("dictionary");

            var result = ToExpando(dictionary);

            return type == typeof(object) ? result : null;
        }

        private static ExpandoObject ToExpando(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary)
        {
            var result = new ExpandoObject();
            var dic = result as IDictionary<String, object>;

            foreach (var item in dictionary)
            {
                var valueAsDic = item.Value as IDictionary<string, object>;
                if (valueAsDic != null)
                {
                    dic.Add(item.Key, ToExpando(valueAsDic));
                    continue;
                }
                var arrayList = item.Value as ArrayList;
                if (arrayList != null && arrayList.Count > 0)
                {
                    dic.Add(item.Key, ToExpando(arrayList));
                    continue;
                }

                dic.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
            }
            return result;
        }

        private static ArrayList ToExpando(ArrayList obj)
        {
            ArrayList result = new ArrayList();

            foreach (var item in obj)
            {
                var valueAsDic = item as IDictionary<string, object>;
                if (valueAsDic != null)
                {
                    result.Add(ToExpando(valueAsDic));
                    continue;
                }

                var arrayList = item as ArrayList;
                if (arrayList != null && arrayList.Count > 0)
                {
                    result.Add(ToExpando(arrayList));
                    continue;
                }

                result.Add(item);
            }
            return result;
        }

        public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
        {
            get { return new ReadOnlyCollection<Type>(new List<Type>(new[] { typeof(object) })); }
        }
    }
}  
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Nikhil Kothari blogged about doing this. He included a link to his library which provides a dynamic implementation of a REST client, which works on JSON data. He also has a JSON client that works off strings of JSON data directly.

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1  
Surely there is an implementation using only the built in datacontractjsonserializer. It'd be great to avoid a third party assembly reference –  Joel Martinez Sep 21 '10 at 13:05
    
Unfortunately that library doesn't work with .NET 4 RTM. –  Drew Noakes Sep 27 '10 at 12:56

There is a lightweight json library for C# called SimpleJson which can be found at http://simplejson.codeplex.com https://github.com/facebook-csharp-sdk/simple-json

It supports .net 3.5+, silverlight and windows phone 7.

Supports dynamic for .net 4.0

Can also be installed as a nuget package

Install-Package SimpleJson
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Simplest way is

Just include this dll

use the code like this

dynamic json = new JDynamic("{a:'abc'}");
//json.a is a string "abc"

dynamic json = new JDynamic("{a:3.1416}");
//json.a is 3.1416m

dynamic json = new JDynamic("{a:1}");
//json.a is

dynamic json = new JDynamic("[1,2,3]");
/json.Length/json.Count is 3
//And you can use json[0]/ json[2] to get the elements

dynamic json = new JDynamic("{a:[1,2,3]}");
//json.a.Length /json.a.Count is 3.
//And you can use  json.a[0]/ json.a[2] to get the elements

dynamic json = new JDynamic("[{b:1},{c:1}]");
//json.Length/json.Count is 2.
//And you can use the  json[0].b/json[1].c to get the num.
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For that I would use JSON.NET to do the low-level parsing of the JSON stream and then build up the object hierarchy out of instances of the ExpandoObject class.

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Its probably a little late to help you but the object you want DynamicJSONObject is included in the System.Web.Helpers.dll from the ASP.NET Web Pages package, which is part of WebMatrix.

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You can extend the JavaScriptSerializer to recursively copy the dictionary it created to expando object(s) and then use them dynamically:

static class JavaScriptSerializerExtensions
{
    public static dynamic DeserializeDynamic(this JavaScriptSerializer serializer, string value)
    {
        var dictionary = serializer.Deserialize<IDictionary<string, object>>(value);
        return GetExpando(dictionary);
    }

    private static ExpandoObject GetExpando(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary)
    {
        var expando = (IDictionary<string, object>)new ExpandoObject();

        foreach (var item in dictionary)
        {
            var innerDictionary = item.Value as IDictionary<string, object>;
            if (innerDictionary != null)
            {
                expando.Add(item.Key, GetExpando(innerDictionary));
            }
            else
            {
                expando.Add(item.Key, item.Value);
            }
        }

        return (ExpandoObject)expando;
    }
}

Then you just need to having a using statement for the namespace you defined the extension in (consider just defining them in System.Web.Script.Serialization... another trick is to not use a namespace, then you don't need the using statement at all) and you can consume them like so:

var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
var value = serializer.DeserializeDynamic("{ 'Name': 'Jon Smith', 'Address': { 'City': 'New York', 'State': 'NY' }, 'Age': 42 }");

var name = (string)value.Name; // Jon Smith
var age = (int)value.Age;      // 42

var address = value.Address;
var city = (string)address.City;   // New York
var state = (string)address.State; // NY
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The following post explains exactly how to do that: Dynamic types with JSON.NET

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5  
Take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/how-to-answer: Provide context for links A link to a potential solution is always welcome, but please add context around the link so your fellow users will have some idea what it is and why it’s there –  Janes Abou Chleih Aug 4 '13 at 20:00

To get an ExpandoObject:

using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Converters;

Container container = JsonConvert.Deserialize<Container>(jsonAsString, new ExpandoObjectConverter());
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Another way using Newtonsoft.Json:

dynamic stuff = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject("{ color: 'red', value: 5 }");
string color = stuff.color;
int value = stuff.value;
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use DataSet(C#) With javascript simple function for create json stream with DataSet input create json like(multi table dataset) [[{a:1,b:2,c:3},{a:3,b:5,c:6}],[{a:23,b:45,c:35},{a:58,b:59,c:45}]]

just client side use eval for example

var d=eval('[[{a:1,b:2,c:3},{a:3,b:5,c:6}],[{a:23,b:45,c:35},{a:58,b:59,c:45}]]')

then use

d[0][0].a //out 1 from table 0 row 0

d[1][1].b //out 59 from table 1 row 1

//create by Behnam Mohammadi And Saeed Ahmadian
public string jsonMini(DataSet ds)
{
    int t=0, r=0, c=0;
    string stream = "[";

    for (t = 0; t < ds.Tables.Count; t++)
    {
        stream += "[";
        for (r = 0; r < ds.Tables[t].Rows.Count; r++)
        {
            stream += "{";
            for (c = 0; c < ds.Tables[t].Columns.Count; c++)
            {
                stream += ds.Tables[t].Columns[c].ToString() + ":'" + ds.Tables[t].Rows[r][c].ToString() + "',";
            }
            if(c>0)
                stream = stream.Substring(0, stream.Length - 1);
            stream += "},";
        }
        if(r>0)
            stream = stream.Substring(0, stream.Length - 1);
        stream += "],";
    }
    if(t>0)
        stream = stream.Substring(0, stream.Length - 1);
    stream += "];";
    return stream;
}
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