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I have a query that I want to sort alphabetically, but the trick is that I want the sorting to treat two columns equally. For instance, if the first row of first_col equals apple and the second row of second_col equals aardvark I want the value in the second row of second_col to be listed before the value in the first row of first_col. A value (not NULL or '') will always exist in every row of second_col, but the value in first_col can be ''. Hopefully I have explained this good enough. I don't care if I have to use MySQL or PHP for this, but once sorted, the array is read through and echoed into an HTML table. Any thoughts?

EDIT

This is what I have for code right now. In my MySQL query I need b_name and l_name to be equal. The column b_name does not always have a value. When I put the values into the table it is based on the existence of b_name. If b_name does not exist the f_name and l_name are combined to replace b_name.

                $query = "SELECT * FROM customers ORDER BY b_name, l_name";
                $result = mysql_query($query);
                mysql_close($link);

                $num = mysql_num_rows($result);                         

                for ($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){

                    $row = mysql_fetch_array($result);

                    $class = (($i % 2) == 0) ? "table_odd_row" : "table_even_row";

                    if($row[b_name]!=''){
                        echo "<tr class=".$class.">";

                            echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$row[c_id].">".$row[c_id]."</a></td>";
                            echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$row[c_id].">".$row[b_name]."</a></td>";
                            echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$row[c_id].">".$row[phone]."</a></td>";

                        echo "</tr>";

                    }

                    else{
                        echo "<tr class=".$class.">";

                            echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$row[c_id].">".$row[c_id]."</a></td>";
                            echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$row[c_id].">".$row[f_name]." ".$row[l_name]."</a></td>";
                            echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$row[c_id].">".$row[phone]."</a></td>";

                        echo "</tr>";

                    }


                }

            ?>      

        </table>
share|improve this question
    
If the first row is 'a','b' and the second row is 'b','a' and the two columns are treated equally, which of those rows should come first and why? –  Mark Byers Jun 29 '10 at 22:06
    
Show us the query. Generally, the only reliable way to use two columns as one for sorting requires using a UNION –  OMG Ponies Jun 29 '10 at 22:07

5 Answers 5

If your tables are very similar you can do this

In my case I have a table test_a with 2 columns id and name

(SELECT * FROM test_a a1) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT * FROM test_a a2) 
ORDER BY name DESC
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the best solution. –  mRt Jun 30 '10 at 1:41

Your question isn't completely clear but you could try using this as your ORDER BY clause:

ORDER BY LEAST(first_col, second_col)

Demonstration:

CREATE TABLE table1 (first_col VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL, second_col VARCHAR(100) NOT NULL);
INSERT INTO table1 (first_col, second_col) VALUES
('a', 'b'),
('d', 'e'),
('f', 'c');

SELECT first_col, second_col
FROM table1
ORDER BY first_col, second_col;

a b
d e
f c

SELECT first_col, second_col
FROM table1
ORDER BY LEAST(first_col, second_col);

a b
f c
d e
share|improve this answer
    
This basically what I have done, but it does not work because the first_col is always given priority, so everything from second_col ends up at the bottom of the list. –  ubiquibacon Jun 29 '10 at 22:37
    
@typoknig: According to your question you wrote ORDER BY first_col, second_col. This is not the same. –  Mark Byers Jun 29 '10 at 22:44
    
The result is the same, I have tried both ways. –  ubiquibacon Jun 29 '10 at 22:45
    
@typoknig: In general the result is not the same. I've posted some example code so you can see that this is the case. –  Mark Byers Jun 29 '10 at 22:55
    
Sorry, I should have been more technical... The result is the same for me because some of the values in the first_col are '' so all of those values end up at the top of the list, sorted by the value of second_col while all the values in the first_col end up sorted among themselves at the bottom of the list. –  ubiquibacon Jun 29 '10 at 23:28

Try

ORDER BY CONCAT(b_name, l_name)

or (if your fields are NULL when EMPTY)

ORDER BY COALESCE(b_name, l_name)
share|improve this answer

As they say above, UNION ALL is your friend, and, of course, if you have only one table, you can always do this:

(SELECT field1 AS name FROM TABLE1) 
UNION ALL 
(SELECT field2 AS name FROM TABLE1) 
ORDER BY name DESC

So, you are asking for two diferent rows in the same table, and ordering it as it was one.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for all your help guys, but none of your answers allowed me to sort the data AND echo it into the HTML table correctly once sorted. A UNION might have worked, but I think my solution was faster as far as figuring it all out goes.

                $query = "SELECT c_id, b_name, l_name, f_name, phone FROM customers";
                $result = mysql_query($query);
                mysql_close($link);

                $num = mysql_num_rows($result);

                for ($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){
                    $row = mysql_fetch_array($result);

                    if($row[b_name]!=''){
                        $new_result[$i]['c_id'] = $row[c_id];
                        $new_result[$i]['c_name'] = $row[b_name];
                        $new_result[$i]['phone'] = $row[phone];
                    }

                    else{
                        $new_result[$i]['c_id'] = $row[c_id];
                        $new_result[$i]['c_name'] = $row[l_name].", ".$row[f_name];
                        $new_result[$i]['phone'] = $row[phone];                         
                    }
                }                       

                foreach ($new_result as $key => $row) {
                   $c_id[$key]  = $row['c_id'];
                   $c_name[$key] = $row['c_name'];
                   $phone[$key] = $row['phone'];
                }

                array_multisort($c_name, SORT_ASC, $c_id, SORT_ASC, $new_result);   

                for ($i = 0; $i < $num; $i++){

                    $class = (($i % 2) == 0) ? "table_odd_row" : "table_even_row";

                    echo "<tr class=".$class.">";

                        echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$new_result[$i]['c_id'].">".$new_result[$i]['c_id']."</a></td>";
                        echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$new_result[$i]['c_id'].">".$new_result[$i]['c_name']."</a></td>";
                        echo "<td><a href=Edit_Customer.php?c_id=".$new_result[$i]['c_id'].">".$new_result[$i]['phone']."</a></td>";

                    echo "</tr>";                       

                }

            ?>      

        </table>
share|improve this answer
    
selecting the whole table is faster? well-well. I wish your server luck. –  Your Common Sense Jun 30 '10 at 6:04
    
@Col. Sharpnel, you should take another look at the query in my answer. I am not selecting the whole table, only the fields I need. –  ubiquibacon Jun 30 '10 at 7:14
    
Lol you're funny guy :) fields means nothing while rows is everything. –  Your Common Sense Jun 30 '10 at 10:37
    
Please explain to me then because I do not understand what you are getting at. To me it seems the solution I posted in my answer is a good one for me. I need ALL the rows of the columns I selected, and I successfully sorted them with the PHP function array_multisort and echoed them into a table exactly as I wanted. How is any of this bad or more stressful on a server than another alternative (which would most likely require me to restructure the database)? –  ubiquibacon Jun 30 '10 at 18:31

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