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Can somebody please give me an example of a unidirectional @OneToOne primary-key mapping in Hibernate ? I've tried numerous combinations, and so far the best thing I've gotten is this :

@Entity
@Table(name = "paper_cheque_stop_metadata")
@org.hibernate.annotations.Entity(mutable = false)
public class PaperChequeStopMetadata implements Serializable, SecurityEventAware {

private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

@Id
@JoinColumn(name = "paper_cheque_id")
@OneToOne(cascade = {}, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, optional = false, targetEntity = PaperCheque.class)
private PaperCheque paperCheque;
}

Whenever Hibernate tries to automatically generate the schema for the above mapping, it tries to create the primary key as a blob, instead of as a long, which is the id type of PaperCheque. Can somebody please help me ? If I can't get an exact solution, something close would do, but I'd appreciate any response.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your intention is to have a 1-1 relationship between PaperChequeStopMetaData and PaperCheque? If that's so, you can't define the PaperCheque instance as the @Id of PaperChequeStopMetaData, you have to define a separate @Id column in PaperChequeStopMetaData.

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I saved this discussion when I implemented a couple of @OneToOne mappings, I hope it can be of use to you too, but we don't let Hibernate create the database for us.

Note the GenericGenerator annotation.

Anyway, I have this code working:

@Entity
@Table(name = "message")
public class Message implements java.io.Serializable
{
    @OneToOne(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, fetch = FetchType.LAZY)
    @PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "id", referencedColumnName = "message_id")
    public MessageContent getMessageContent()
    {
        return messageContent;
    }
}

@Entity
@Table(name = "message_content")
@GenericGenerator(name = "MessageContent", strategy = "foreign",
    parameters =
    {
      @org.hibernate.annotations.Parameter
      (
        name = "property", value = "message"
      )
    }
)
public class MessageContent implements java.io.Serializable
{
    @Id
    @Column(name = "message_id", unique = true, nullable = false)
    // See http://forum.hibernate.org/viewtopic.php?p=2381079
    @GeneratedValue(generator = "MessageContent")
    public Integer getMessageId()
    {
            return this.messageId;
    }
}
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Thank you both for your answers. I kept experimenting, and here's what I got working :

@Entity
@Table(name = "paper_cheque_stop_metadata")
@org.hibernate.annotations.Entity(mutable = false)
public class PaperChequeStopMetadata implements Serializable, SecurityEventAware {

private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

@SuppressWarnings("unused")
@Id
@Column(name = "paper_cheque_id")
@AccessType("property")
private long	id;

@OneToOne(cascade = {}, fetch = FetchType.EAGER, optional = false, targetEntity = PaperCheque.class)
@PrimaryKeyJoinColumn(name = "paper_cheque_id")
@JoinColumn(name = "paper_cheque_id", insertable = true)
@NotNull
private PaperCheque paperCheque;

@XmlAttribute(namespace = XMLNS, name = "paper-cheque-id", required = true)
public final long getId() {
	return this.paperCheque.getId();
}

public final void setId(long id) {
	//this.id = id;
	//NOOP, this is essentially a pseudo-property
}
}

This is, by all means, a disgusting hack, but it gets me everything I wanted. The paperCheque property accessors are as normal (not shown). I've run into this kind of unidirectional OneToOne mapping problem before and settled for much worse solutions, but this time I decided I was going to figure out out, so I kept hacking away at it. Once again, thank you both for your answers, it's much appreciated.

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You should stay away from hibernate's OneToOne mapping, it is very dangerous. see http://opensource.atlassian.com/projects/hibernate/browse/HHH-2128

you are better off using ManyToOne mappings.

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