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I have an application, which has a (Qt C++) singleton logger class. The GetInstance() implementation is:

if(m_Instance == NULL)
{
    try
    {
        m_Instance = new Logger();
    }
    catch(...){}
}
return m_Instance;

Now I have following macro in the .h file: "#define LOG Logger::Instance()->Log"

Everything is fine as long as new() operation works. What is the best way to ensure that pointer has set (I was thinking some try-catch blocks to catch the std::bad_alloc, but I don't know how to implement that in a macro)? I have created a workaround, which seems to work but is not pretty:

"#define LOG if(Logger::Instance()) Logger::Instance()->Log"

In addition, I would like to know what if my object has a lot getters/setters (e.g. setPath(), getSize()...)? Currently, I have a macro:

"#define SET Settings::Instance()"

and in code I'm able to use SET->setPath("abc"); or SET->getSize();

In this case my ugly workaround does not work, because it requires separate macro for every method. Any tips how I can improve that?

Thanks for the answers.

share|improve this question
    
The macro with an if in it is pure evil. Consider the meaning of if (error) LOG("Error!"); else DoImportantStuff();. – Mike Seymour Jun 30 '10 at 9:05

Don't use a terrible design pattern -> don't get problems. Normally, people use something more akin to

Logger& Logger::GetInstance() {
    static Logger instance; 
    return instance;
}

But the singleton pattern is in general absolutely terrible. Use the application instance pattern instead.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1: I don't understand why everyone wants to use this awful singleton pattern. – ereOn Jun 30 '10 at 8:27
    
@ereOn: Obviously Qt leads you into this direction... Also, Singleton seems to be an easy design pattern and therefore beginners remember and use it. – ur. Jun 30 '10 at 8:35
1  
@InsertNickHere: Singleton is a terrible design pattern because you run into all sorts of problems when you hit threading and stuff, and there's flat out no need for it if you make an application instance like every other smart person. – Puppy Jun 30 '10 at 8:38
2  
I wouldn't like to make an authorative statement and say that singleton is never useful - but I've never come across a situation where it's useful, yet I have come across all the situations commonly used as an example of where singleton is useful. – Joe Gauterin Jun 30 '10 at 8:58
1  
@itsme1: first, does it really need to be global? What about just creating a single instance at the start of your program, and then passing a reference around to every object that needs to use it? Second, if it does have to be global, make it a global. Not a singleton. A single object declared outside any and all functions. – jalf Jun 30 '10 at 9:15

First of all, do you really want your application to silently ignore everything you are doing with these singletons should they fail to be allocated? For something like a logger, you might want to use it to report exception messages, so perhaps you don't want to allow it to throw as well.

For such cases, consider calling the instance method when your application starts (ex: in your main entry point) up so that if the application starts up successfully, it will always have a logger handy, e.g.

Finally, I recommend that m_instance uses something like boost::scoped_ptr so that you aren't leaking memory (or just store the logger as a static object in the instance method without the pointer indirection). Sure, modern operating systems will generally clean up after you, but if you start doing memory analysis to check for leaks, you're going to get a lot of false positives this way.

As for these macros, I think they are atrocious, but that's just my opinion. You could achieve similar effects without macros:

void write_to_log(Logger* logger, const char* msg)
{
    if (logger)
        logger->log(msg);
}

or even:

void write_to_log(const char* msg)
{
    Logger* logger = Logger::instance();
    if (logger)
        logger->log(msg);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The std::nothrow won't stop the constructor from throwing, it only stops 'operator new' from throwing. – Joe Gauterin Jun 30 '10 at 8:53
    
@Joe good point. I was thinking of this problem too much in a vacuum. I will modify this accordingly. – stinky472 Jun 30 '10 at 8:58
1  
@itsme1: the memory leak could be a problem it you're testing for memory leaks. Allowing "harmless" leaks has the same effect as allowing "harmless" compiler warnings: the log will contain so many that you might not spot new, possibly harmful, ones. – Mike Seymour Jun 30 '10 at 9:26
    
@Mike +1. I was trying to say the same thing, but you worded it in a much clearer way. – stinky472 Jun 30 '10 at 10:41

You don't say what you want to do if you haven't got a log.

If you want the error to propagate up, either don't catch the exception or throw more specific one to indicate a lack of log.

If you want to carry on regardless, either have a null check on every use, or use the null object pattern to replace the procedural check with a virtual method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the null object pattern - I like it. – Björn Pollex Jun 30 '10 at 8:12

If you are sure about singleton pattern (which seem to be overused here), then:

struct ILogger {
    void Log(const char *message) = 0;
};

struct NullLogger : ILogger {
    void Log(const char *message) { }
};

struct Logger : ILogger {
private:
    static ILogger *m_instance;
    static const NullLogger m_null_instance;

public:
    void Log(const char *message) { /* ... */ }

    static ILogger *Instance() {
        if(m_Instance != &m_null_instance) return m_Instance;

        try { m_Instance = new Logger(); } catch(...) { }

        return m_Instance;
    }
};

const NullLogger Logger::m_null_instance;
ILogger *Logger::m_instance = &Logger::m_null_instance;

/* ... */
#define LOG Logger::Instance()->Log
LOG("Hey!");
share|improve this answer

You have already caught the exception in your GetInstance method, so nothing would ever emerge into the macro anyway. Perhaps...

if(m_Instance == NULL)
{
    try
    {
        m_Instance = new Logger();
    }
    catch (std::bad_alloc &ba)
    {
        // do something here...
    }
    catch(...){}
}

return m_Instance;
share|improve this answer
    
If the exception is caught, then m_Instance would still be null, and the macro would expand into code which dereferences a null pointer, causing further problems. – Pete Kirkham Jun 30 '10 at 8:07
1  
What do you do if the allocation fails? Log the error? – Mike Seymour Jun 30 '10 at 9:53
    
A good question; what DO you do when the error logging system fails? – Brian Hooper Jun 30 '10 at 11:14

(1) As others mentioned: Don't use singletons. (2) If you use a singleton, use one with a solid implementation. (3) If you want a HACK:

void Logger::Log( /*params*/ )
{
  if( NULL != this )
  {
    // do your logging
    ...
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
WHy put the HACK there, when there is a much cleaner place in the macro #define LOG (Logger::Instance()== NULL ? Logger::DevNull : Logger::Instance())->Log. The idea is that Logger::DevNull->Log(foo) discards foo. – MSalters Jun 30 '10 at 11:25
    
@MSalters: Because it's broken in Logger class, so fix it in Logger class. – ur. Jun 30 '10 at 12:27

Thanks for the replies.

My singleton implementation is created based on various examples available in the web. ( e.g. http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/C++Singleton.html is pretty close to mine).

The reason why I'm using singleton is to ensure that there is only one instance of the class (logger / settings) and yes I know it is overused.

However, it looks like I have to go and try to implement something similar without using the singleton.

share|improve this answer

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