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I want to compare two floats in PHP, like in this sample code:

$a = 0.17;
$b = 1 - 0.83; //0.17
if($a == $b ){
 echo 'a and b are same';
}
else {
 echo 'a and b are not same';
}

In this code it returns the result of the else condition instead of the if condition, even though $a and $b are same. Is there any special way to handle/compare floats in PHP?

If yes then please help me to solve this issue.

Or is there a problem with my server config?

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I get a and b are same. Is this your full code? –  Pekka 웃 Jun 30 '10 at 11:55
    
what version? it works fine for me. –  galambalazs Jun 30 '10 at 11:55
9  
read the red warning php.net/manual/en/language.types.float.php –  Andrey Jun 30 '10 at 11:57
    
@Andrey this is probably it because the real world case is likely to be more complex than the example quoted. Why not add it as an answer? –  Pekka 웃 Jun 30 '10 at 11:59
2  
Did you read the floating-point tag description? stackoverflow.com/tags/floating-point/info That's a behavior you'd likely encounter in any programming language, when using floating-point numbers. See e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/588004/is-javascripts-math-broken –  Piskvor Mar 29 '12 at 20:37

11 Answers 11

up vote 71 down vote accepted

If you do it like this they should be the same. But note that a characteristic of floating-point values is that calculations which seem to result in the same value do not need to actually be identical. So if $a is a literal .17 and $b arrives there through a calculation it can well be that they are different, albeit both display the same value.

Usually you never compare floating-point values for equality like this, you need to use a smallest acceptable difference:

if (abs(($a-$b)/$b) < 0.00001) {
  echo "same";
}

Something like that.

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6  
golden answer for these questions (thousands of them). –  Andrey Jun 30 '10 at 12:00
    
Thanks Johannes, it worked for me . .. thanks a lot. –  santosh Jun 30 '10 at 12:29
    
BEWARE! Choosing a fixed epsilon is a bad way just because it looks small, this comparison will return true in alot of precision errors when the numbers are small. A correct way would be to check if the relative error is smaller than the epsilon. abs($a-$b) > abs(($a-$b)/$b) –  beatngu Jun 21 '13 at 13:18
    
Yes, I intentionally simplified here. –  Joey Jun 21 '13 at 19:34
    
Excellent Answer to an Excellent Question... –  Padyster Oct 8 '13 at 15:13

Read the red warning first http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.float.php. You must never compare floats for equality. You should use the epsilon technique.

For example:

if (abs($a-$b) < EPSILON) { … }

where EPSILON is constant representing a very small number (you have to define it)

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Or try to use bc math functions:

<?php
$a = 0.17;
$b = 1 - 0.83; //0.17

echo "$a == $b (core comp oper): ", var_dump($a==$b);
echo "$a == $b (with bc func)  : ", var_dump( bccomp($a, $b)==0 );

Result:

0.17 == 0.17 (core comp oper): bool(false)
0.17 == 0.17 (with bc func)  : bool(true)
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I hate to say it, but "works for me":

Beech:~ adamw$ php -v
PHP 5.3.1 (cli) (built: Feb 11 2010 02:32:22) 
Copyright (c) 1997-2009 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v2.3.0, Copyright (c) 1998-2009 Zend Technologies
Beech:~ adamw$ php -f test.php
a and b are same

Now, floating point comparisons are in general tricky - things that you might expect to be the same are not (due to rounding errors and/or representation nuances). You might want to read http://floating-point-gui.de/

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Here is the solution for comparing floating points or decimal numbers

//$fd['someVal'] = 2.9;
//$i for loop variable steps 0.1
if((string)$fd['someVal']== (string)$i)
{
    //Same
}

Cast a decimal variable to string and you will be fine.

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As said before, be very careful when doing floating point comparisons (whether equal-to, greater-than, or less-than) in PHP. However if you're only ever interested in a few significant digits, you can do something like:

$a = round(0.17, 2);
$b = round(1 - 0.83, 2); //0.17
if($a == $b ){
    echo 'a and b are same';
}
else {
    echo 'a and b are not same';
}

The use of rounding to 2 decimal places (or 3, or 4) will cause the expected result.

share|improve this answer
if( 0.1 + 0.2 == 0.3 ){
 echo 'a and b are same';
}
else {
 echo 'a and b are not same';
}

This will cause problems, because of the IEEE standard floating point arithmetic (which has this problem).

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1  
Every fixed-precision floating-point arithmetic has this problem; that's not a unique trait of IEEE 754 –  Joey Jun 30 '10 at 12:01

If you write it just like that it will probably work, so I imagine you've simplified it for the question. (And keeping the question simple and concise is normally a very good thing.)

But in this case I imagine one result is a calculation and one result is a constant.

This violates a cardinal rule of floating point programming: Never do equality comparisons.

The reasons for this are a bit subtle1 but what's important to remember is that they usually don't work (except, ironically, for integral values) and that the alternative is a fuzzy comparison along the lines of:

if abs(a - y) < epsilon



1. One of the major problems involves the way we write numbers in programs. We write them as decimal strings, and as a result most of the fractions we write do not have exact machine representations. They don't have exact finite forms because they repeat in binary. Every machine fraction is a rational number of the form x/2n. Now, the constants are decimal and every decimal constant is a rational number of the form x/(2n * 5m). The 5m numbers are odd, so there isn't a 2n factor for any of them. Only when m == 0 is there a finite representation in both the binary and decimal expansion of the fraction. So, 1.25 is exact because it's 5/(22*50) but 0.1 is not because it's 1/(20*51). In fact, in the series 1.01 .. 1.99 only 3 of the numbers are exactly representable: 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75.

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DigitalRoss its quite difficult to understand few terms in your comment, but yes, its very informative. And I am going to google these terms. Thanks :) –  santosh Mar 26 '12 at 6:52
    
Isn't it safe enough to do comparisons on floats, provided you are rounding the result every time and are within a few significant digits? In other words round($float, 3) == round($other, 3) –  Michael Butler Jul 21 at 18:00

One neglected pitfall here ...

If you're working with signed floats you'll want to do two comparisons to check for proximity:

$a - $b < EPSILON && $b - $a < EPSILON
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just use abs function? –  asdrubalivan May 27 '13 at 14:11

This works for me on PHP 5.3.27.

$payments_total = 123.45;
$order_total = 123.45;

if (round($payments_total, 2) != round($order_total, 2)) {
   // they don't match
}
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function floatcmp($f1,$f2,$precision = 10)
{
    $e = pow(10,$precision);
    return (intval($f1 * $e) == intval($f2 * $e));
}

Test Case

$a = 0.17;
$b = 0.17;

echo floatcmp($a,$b) ? 'yes' : 'no'; // yes
echo floatcmp($a,$b + 0.01) ? 'yes' : 'no'; // no
share|improve this answer
    
it is not performance efficient. –  Andrey Jun 30 '10 at 11:59

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