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Is it possible to read an aspx file and render as an html file, and write the resulting html file to disk?

The .aspx file is on the filesystem without the codebehind file. If it is possible, please provide some example code.

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6 Answers 6

from remote url

byte[] buf = new byte[8192];
HttpWebRequest webRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(path);
webRequest.KeepAlive = false;
string content = string.Empty;
HttpWebResponse webResponse = (HttpWebResponse)webRequest.GetResponse();
if (!(webResponse.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.OK))
    if (_log.IsErrorEnabled) _log.Error(string.Format("Url {0} not found", path));

Stream resStream = webResponse.GetResponseStream();

int count = 0;
do
{
    count = resStream.Read(buf, 0, buf.Length);
    if (count != 0)
    {
        content += encoding.GetString(buf, 0, count);
    }
}
while (count > 0);

from network or virtual path

string content = string.Empty;
path = HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(path);

if (!File.Exists(path))
if (_log.IsErrorEnabled) _log.Error(string.Format("file {0} not found", path));

StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path, encoding);
content = sr.ReadToEnd();
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I think he wants the rendered html (what is sent to the browser after it has finished rendering)... –  Matthew Abbott Jun 30 '10 at 12:45
    
uhm ok, you're right –  Zaragon Jun 30 '10 at 12:50

You need to use the wwAspRuntimeHost class.

Rick Strahl had a post on this, and I actually used the same approach he recommendsd to host ASP.NET runtime engine in a non-IIS environment. Here's the link:

http://www.west-wind.com/presentations/aspnetruntime/aspnetruntime.asp

(update to the original post)
http://www.west-wind.com/Weblog/posts/1197.aspx

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This is what ASP.NET does all the time. It looks for an ASPX page on the file system, compiles it, if required, and then processes the request.

Codebehind is optional. You can have a website with only ASPX in it, without any precompiled code.

Here's a ASPX page without codebehind

<%@ Page language="c#" %>
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" >
<HTML>
<HEAD>
    <title>ClearCache</title>
</HEAD>
<body>
    <form id="ClearCache" method="post" runat="server">
        <% 
        IList keys = new ArrayList(Cache.Count);
        foreach (DictionaryEntry de in Cache) 
            keys.Add(de.Key);

        foreach (string key in keys)
        {
            this.Response.Write(key + "<br>");
            Cache.Remove(key);

        }

    %>
    </form>
</body>
</HTML>

Downloading the file as html:

var wc = new WebClient();
wc.DownloadFile(myUrl, filename);

If you don't have a ASP.NET web-server, you have to start a server. Cassini is great for this. Then your code should look like this:

var server = new Server(80,"/", pathToWebSite);
server.Start();
var wc = new WebClient();
wc.DownloadFile(server.RootUrl + "myPage.aspx", filename);
server.Stop();

If you run this more than once, the server should be cached.

Note that you could also use a RuntimeHost as mentioned by code4life. Cassini does something similar. I'd give goth a try and see, what better fits your purpose.

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This example doesn't help, because it's only writing the aspx file to another file without rendering –  p.re Jun 30 '10 at 13:10
    
That's only true, if you don't have a ASP.NET enabled server. I'll update my post. –  Michael Stoll Jun 30 '10 at 17:04

ASPX files are dynamic => generated HTML depends on state of the application.
If you are missing the codebehind file, you cannot properly translate the code.

Mono Project has a code evaluator. That said, it won't help you without application state.

The only thing you can do is parse the aspx file as xml (if it is valid) and filter out the dynamic content.

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Thats true if the ASPX file depends on the code behind, if there is no code in the code behind, you could translate the file, in theory –  Dan McClain Jun 30 '10 at 12:46
    
I thought he is missing the codebehind code. It depends on situation - whether the page itself requires application state or not. Anyway, it is pretty easy putting an aspx file to a web application and downloading resulting html. –  Jaroslav Jandek Jun 30 '10 at 13:39

I don't think you can do what you need to, without the ASP.NET runtime. If you have the ASP.NET runtime, and still want to be able to generate a HTML file from the content of an ASPX file, you could write an IHttpModule which writes the response text to a file.

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If I'm understanding your question correctly, you want an instance of the Page class created (i.e. the aspx page is compiled) and ulimately the resulting html? But you want that to happen outside the context of a web server request?

If you're looking for the html after an aspx page is actually processed, why not just grab the html returned after a page is actually rendered via IIS or whatever?

Perhaps if you shared your motivation(s) for attempting this you'll get some solid suggestions...

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