Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for the most pythonic way of splitting a list of numbers into smaller lists based on a number missing in the sequence. For example, if the initial list was:

seq1 = [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]

the function would yield:

[[1, 2, 3, 4], [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]]

or

seq2 = [1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10]

would result in:

[[1, 2], [4, 5, 6], [8, 9, 10]]
share|improve this question
2  
How do you know which number is "missing"? Are you requiring that the sequences be simple ascending integers without duplicates? Please state the rules for finding a missing value. –  S.Lott Jun 30 '10 at 13:01
    
do you have some working code that you feel isn't pythonic that you could post? –  Matthew J Morrison Jun 30 '10 at 13:04
    
What do you want it for? I've got a code snippet for reducing number sequences where contiguous numbers can be represented as ranges: e.g. [[1,4],[6,10]] –  MattH Jun 30 '10 at 13:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

From the python documentation:

>>> # Find runs of consecutive numbers using groupby.  The key to the solution
>>> # is differencing with a range so that consecutive numbers all appear in
>>> # same group.
>>> data = [ 1,  4,5,6, 10, 15,16,17,18, 22, 25,26,27,28]
>>> for k, g in groupby(enumerate(data), lambda (i,x):i-x):
...     print map(itemgetter(1), g)
...
[1]
[4, 5, 6]
[10]
[15, 16, 17, 18]
[22]
[25, 26, 27, 28]

The groupby() function from the itertools module generates a break every time the key function changes its return value. The trick is that the return value is the number in the list minus the position of the element in the list. This difference changes when there is a gap in the numbers.

The itemgetter() function is from the operator module, you'll have to import this and the itertools module for this example to work.

Full example with your data:

>>> from operator import itemgetter
>>> from itertools import *
>>> seq2 = [1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10]
>>> list = []
>>> for k, g in groupby(enumerate(seq2), lambda (i,x):i-x):
...     list.append(map(itemgetter(1), g))
... 
>>> print list
[[1, 2], [4, 5, 6], [8, 9, 10]]

Or as a list comprehension:

>>> [map(itemgetter(1), g) for k, g in groupby(enumerate(seq2), lambda (i,x):i-x)]
[[1, 2], [4, 5, 6], [8, 9, 10]]
share|improve this answer
4  
I don't think you can get more pythonic than this:) –  extraneon Jun 30 '10 at 13:12
    
+1. If the documentation says to do it that way, it's probably a good way to do it. –  Brian Jun 30 '10 at 13:19
1  
The whole itertools module is worth a look, there is some nice stuff in there. –  Mad Scientist Jun 30 '10 at 13:37
1  
Each time I encounter itertools I get surprised. –  Wayne Werner Jun 30 '10 at 14:07
1  
Exactly what I was looking for. And what better place to look for it than the Python docs -- hiding in plain sight. –  billybandicoot Jul 1 '10 at 2:51

Another option which doesn't need itertools etc.:

>>> data = [1, 4, 5, 6, 10, 15, 16, 17, 18, 22, 25, 26, 27, 28]
>>> spl = [0]+[i for i in range(1,len(data)) if data[i]-data[i-1]>1]+[None]
>>> [data[b:e] for (b, e) in [(spl[i-1],spl[i]) for i in range(1,len(spl))]]
... [[1], [4, 5, 6], [10], [15, 16, 17, 18], [22], [25, 26, 27, 28]]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.