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i have been following this course in youtube and it was talking about how some programmers can use there knowledge of how memory is laid to do clever things.. one of the examples in the lecture was something like that

#include <stdio.h>
void makeArray();
void printArray();
int main(){
        makeArray();
        printArray();
        return 0;
}
void makeArray(){
    int array[10];
    int i;
    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
        array[i]=i;
}
void printArray(){
    int array[10];
    int i;  
    for(i=0;i<10;i++)
        printf("%d\n",array[i]);
}

the idea is as long as the two function has the same activation record size on the stack segment it will work and print numbers from 0 to 9 ... but actually it prints something like that

134520820
-1079626712
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

there are always those two values at the begging ... can any one explain that ??? iam using gcc in linux

the exact lecture url starting at 5:15

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1  
honestly I don't see the great benefit with this code? imagine having a flight control system with this "clever" hack. imagine also the maintenance engineer trying to understand it... –  Claptrap Jun 30 '10 at 13:38
1  
Why would you do something like this? Why not declare the array in a scope visible to both functions, or pass a pointer to the array as a parameter? –  pcent Jun 30 '10 at 13:48
4  
why i have to explain this over and over ... i know that this has no use ... it was an example in a lecture and i just wanted to explain . –  Ahmed Kotb Jun 30 '10 at 14:00
1  
This is an excellent example of what not to do ever for a couple different reasons so I'm voting it up. –  Rokujolady Jun 30 '10 at 15:40
2  
Most 'clever' usage of the stack is only of interest for writing exploits, such as the classic buffer overflow that manipulates the stack to inject arbitrary code through passing data. It's worth understanding what's happening here, if only so as to be more cognizant of security vulnerabilities. –  Dan Bryant Jun 30 '10 at 16:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

I'm sorry but there's absolutely nothing clever about that piece of code and people who use it are very foolish.


Addendum:

Or, sometimes, just sometimes, very clever. Having watched the video linked to in the question update, this wasn't some rogue code monkey breaking the rules. This guy understood what he was doing quite well.

It requires a deep understanding of the underlying code generated and can easily break (as mentioned and seen here) if your environment changes (like compilers, architectures and so on).

But, provided you have that knowledge, you can probably get away with it. It's not something I'd suggest to anyone other than a veteran but I can see it having its place in very limited situations and, to be honest I've no doubt occasinally been somewhat more ... pragmatic ... than I should have been in my own career :-)

Now back to your regular programming ...


It's non-portable between architectures, compilers, releases of compilers, and probably even optimisation levels within the same release of a compiler, as well as being undefined behaviour (reading uninitialised variables).

Your best bet if you want to understand it is to examine the assembler code output by the compiler.

But your best bet overall is to just forget about it and code to the standard.


For example, this transcript shows how gcc can have different behaviour at different optimisation levels:

pax> gcc -o qq qq.c ; ./qq
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

pax> gcc -O3 -o qq qq.c ; ./qq
1628373048
1629343944
1629097166
2280872
2281480
0
0
0
1629542238
1629542245

At gcc's high optimisation level (what I like to call its insane optimisation level), this is the makeArray function. It's basically figured out that the array is not used and therefore optimised its initialisation out of existence.

_makeArray:
        pushl   %ebp            ; stack frame setup
        movl    %esp, %ebp

                                ; heavily optimised function

        popl    %ebp            ; stack frame tear-down

        ret                     ; and return

I'm actually slightly surprised that gcc even left the function stub in there at all.

Update: as Nicholas Knight points out in a comment, the function remains since it must be visible to the linker - making the function static results in gcc removing the stub as well.

If you check the assembler code at optimisation level 0 below, it gives a clue (it's not the actual reason - see below). Examine the following code and you'll see that the stack frame setup is different for the two functions despite the fact that they have exactly the same parameters passed in and the same local variables:

subl    $48, %esp     ; in makeArray
subl    $56, %esp     ; in printArray

This is because printArray allocates some extra space to store the address of the printf format string and the address of the array element, four bytes each, which accounts for the eight bytes (two 32-bit values) difference.

That's the most likely explanation for your array in printArray() being off by two values.

Here's the two functions at optimisation level 0 for your enjoyment :-)

_makeArray:
        pushl   %ebp                     ; stack fram setup
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $48, %esp
        movl    $0, -4(%ebp)             ; i = 0
        jmp     L4                       ; start loop
L5:
        movl    -4(%ebp), %edx
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax
        movl    %eax, -44(%ebp,%edx,4)   ; array[i] = i
        addl    $1, -4(%ebp)             ; i++
L4:
        cmpl    $9, -4(%ebp)             ; for all i up to and including 9
        jle     L5                       ; continue loop
        leave
        ret
        .section .rdata,"dr"
LC0:
        .ascii "%d\12\0"                 ; format string for printf
        .text

_printArray:
        pushl   %ebp                     ; stack frame setup
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $56, %esp
        movl    $0, -4(%ebp)             ; i = 0
        jmp     L8                       ; start loop
L9:
        movl    -4(%ebp), %eax           ; get i
        movl    -44(%ebp,%eax,4), %eax   ; get array[i]
        movl    %eax, 4(%esp)            ; store array[i] for printf
        movl    $LC0, (%esp)             ; store format string
        call    _printf                  ; make the call
        addl    $1, -4(%ebp)             ; i++
L8:
        cmpl    $9, -4(%ebp)             ; for all i up to and including 9
        jle     L9                       ; continue loop
        leave
        ret

Update: As Roddy points out in a comment. that's not the cause of your specific problem since, in this case, the array is actually at the same position in memory (%ebp-44 with %ebp being the same across the two calls). What I was trying to point out was that two functions with the same argument list and same local parameters did not necessarily end up with the same stack frame layout.

All it would take would be for printArray to swap the location of its local variables (including any temporaries not explicitly created by the developer) around and you would have this problem.

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2  
It's probably portable between architectures, but in no way is it guaranteed to work since it relies on undefined behavior and common habits of C compilers. There are situations where crazy things like this are good to know. –  Adam Shiemke Jun 30 '10 at 13:26
1  
This, this, a million times THIS. I don't even want to THINK about the inevitable bugs when some developer thinks they're "clever" and actually uses this in real code. This is the ultimate in "it works on my machine!" nonsense. –  Nicholas Knight Jun 30 '10 at 13:27
1  
@Ahmed: It's not useful in coding anything. You can't know why it behaves like that without knowing exactly how your particular compiler and platform work. Not all implementations are going to behave the same way, as you've already discovered, and there's no meaningful rhyme or reason to it. That the person perpetrating this crime on computer science was a university professor does not surprise me. That he's at facebook surprises me even less. These facts do nothing to give him credibility. –  Nicholas Knight Jun 30 '10 at 13:35
5  
@paxdiablo: The stub being there is easy enough to explain, the only safe place to eliminate the stub would be in the linker, which I doubt is affected by GCC's -On flag. –  Nicholas Knight Jun 30 '10 at 13:48
2  
@Ahmed, I wasn't specifically targeting you but, when you've been in the industry for 30 years and had to clean up this sort of problem so many time, cynical as I you may become, young Padawan :-) See the update as to the specific likely cause, more stack used in one of the functions. You really can learn a lot by examining the assembler files (gcc -S for example). –  paxdiablo Jun 30 '10 at 14:08

Probably GCC generates code that does not push the arguments to the stack when calling a function, instead it allocates extra space in the stack. The arguments to your 'printf' function call, "%d\n" and array[i] take 8 bytes on the stack, the first argument is a pointer and the second is an integer. This explains why there are two integers that are not printed correctly.

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+1 very clever.. –  Tomas Jun 30 '10 at 13:30
1  
Nice idea, but most certainly wrong. The params would be pushed immediately before printf is called. If they were anywhere else, printf wouldn't know how to find them. And because printf uses variable args, they cant be passed in registers. –  Roddy Jun 30 '10 at 13:40
    
Well, normally gcc would use push/pop, like this: pastebin.com/bpgX0AVM But there are cases where it would allocate extra space for the arguments in the function prolog: pastebin.com/HD0aAk5x –  X-N2O Jun 30 '10 at 13:57
    
Well, you're correct in that they're not pushed using PUSH instructions, but the SUB ESP,n ... MOV [ESP],value results (as is MUST) in an identical stack layout to the PUSH instructions. It just saves a cycle or so. –  Roddy Jun 30 '10 at 15:05
    
+1 for not being a judgementalist preacher. –  James Morris Aug 30 at 20:56

Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever do anything like this. It will not work reliably. You will get odd bugs. It is far from portable.

Ways it can fail:

.1. The compiler adds extra, hidden code

DevStudio, in debug mode, adds calls to functions that check the stack to catch stack errors. These calls will overwrite what was on the stack, thus losing your data.

.2. Someone adds an Enter/Exit call

Some compilers allow the programmer to define functions to be called on function entry and function exit. Like (1) these use stack space and will overwrite what's already there, losing data.

.3. Interrupts

In main(), if you get an interrupt between the calls to makeArray and printArray, you will lose your data. The first thing that happens when processing an interrupt is to save the state of the cpu. This usually involves pushing the CPU registers and flags onto the stack, and yes, you guessed it, overwrite your data.

.4. Compilers are clever

As you've seen, the array in makeArray is at a different address to the one in printArray. The compiler has placed it's local variables in different positions on the stack. It uses a complex algorithm to decide where to put variable - on the stack, in a register, etc and it's really not worth trying to figure out how the compiler does it as the next version of the compiler might do it some other way.

To sum up, these kind of 'clever tricks' aren't tricks and are certainly not clever. You would not lose anything by declaring the array in main and passing a reference/pointer to it in the two functions. Stacks are for storing local variables and function return addresses. Once your data goes out of scope (i.e. the stack top shrinks past the data) then the data is effectively lost - anything can happen to it.

To illustrate this point more, your results would probably be different if you had different function names (I'm just guessing here, OK).

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1  
Ah, bitten by the infamous "all lists start at 1 no matter what number you put there" SO misfeature :-) –  paxdiablo Jun 30 '10 at 14:26
    
Whoa, wasn't aware of that one. Fixed it (sort of). –  Skizz Jun 30 '10 at 15:03
1  
+1 for mentioning interrupts! –  Roddy Jun 30 '10 at 18:52

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