Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I number my results where the lowest ID is #1 and the highest ID is the #numberOfResults

Example: If I have a table with only 3 rows in it. whose ID's are 24, 87, 112 it would pull like this:

ID  24  87  112
Num 1   2   3

The reason why I want this, is my manager wants items to be numbered like item1, item2, etc. I initially made it so it used the ID but he saw them like item24, item87, item112. He didn't like that at all and wants them to be like item1, item2, item3. I personally think this is going to lead to problems because if you are deleting and adding items, then item2 will not always refer to the same thing and may cause confusion for the users. So if anyone has a better idea I would like to hear it.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
try to convince your boss that it as bad idea, for exactly the reason you mentioned yourself: what happens if an item gets deleted. –  jigfox Jun 30 '10 at 13:53
    
Not only that, but users shouldn't get tied into some arbitrary numbering scheme. I wouldn't show either ID on the front end. If they want an item, they should know it's name. There are some cases where items may all be very similar or the names may be difficult to use (medical systems maybe), and then a set numbering scheme can be useful, but usually it's better to hide these details from the users. –  Tom H. Jun 30 '10 at 13:57
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I agree with the comments about not using a numbering scheme like this if the numbers are going to be used for anything other than a simple ordered display of items with numbers. If the numbers are actually going to be tied to something, then this is a really bad idea!

Use a variable, and increment it in the SELECT statement:

SELECT
    id,
    (@row:=@row+1) AS row
FROM table,
(SELECT @row:=0) AS row_count;

Example:

CREATE TABLE `table1` (
    `id` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
    PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB

INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (24), (87), (112);

SELECT
    id,
    (@row:=@row+1) AS row
FROM table1,
(SELECT @row:=0) AS row_count;

+-----+------+
| id  | row  |
+-----+------+
|  24 |    1 |
|  87 |    2 |
| 112 |    3 |
+-----+------+

How it works

@row is a user defined variable. It is necessary to set it to zero before the main SELECT statement runs. This can be done like this:

SELECT @row:=0;

or like this:

SET @row:=0

But it is handy to tie the two statements together. This can be done by creating a derived table, which is what happens here:

FROM table,
(SELECT @row:=0) AS row_count;

The the second SELECT actually gets run first. Once that's done, it's just a case of incrementing the value of @row for every row retrieved:

@row:=@row+1

The @row value is incremented every time a row is retrieved. It will always generate a sequential list of numbers, no matter what order the rows are accessed. So it's handy for some things, and dangerous for other things...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I have never seen anything like @row:= before. If you don't mind can you explain what is going on there? –  JD Isaacks Jun 30 '10 at 14:01
1  
@John Isaacks: I've updated my answer with an explanation of how it works. –  Mike Jun 30 '10 at 14:11
    
thanks for the great explanation and answer. +1 for that. I am going to mark you as accepted answer because you gave me exactly what my question asked for but I am going to try to see if I can get my manager to agree to something else before I implement it. Thanks! –  JD Isaacks Jun 30 '10 at 14:21
add comment

Sounds like it would be better just making that number in your code instead of trying to come up with some sort of convoluted way of doing it using SQL. When looping through your elements, just maintain the sequentiality there.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What is the ID being used for?

If it's only for quick and easy reference then that's fine, but if it's to be used for deleting or managing in any way as you mentioned then your only option would be to assign a new ID column that is unique for each row in the table. Doing this is pointless though because that duplicates the purpose of your initial ID column.

share|improve this answer
add comment

My company had a similar challenge on a CMS system that used an order field to sort the articles on the front page of the site. The users wanted a "promote, demote" icon that they could click that would move an article up or down.

Again, not ideal, but the strategy we used was to build a promote function and accompanying demote function that identified the current sort value via query, added or subtracted one from the previous or next value, respectively, then set the value of the initially promoted/demoted item. It was also vital to engineer the record insert to accurately set the initial value of newly added records so inserts wouldn't cause a duplicate value to be added. This was also enforced at the DB level for safety's sake. The user was never allowed to directly key in the value of the sort, only promote or demote via icons. To be honest, it worked quite well for the user.

If you have to go this route.....it's not impossible. But there is brain damage involved....

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.