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In the table below

+-------+-----------------------+ 
| id    | timestamp             | 
+-------+-----------------------+ 
| 1     | 2010-06-10 14:35:30   | 
| 2     | 2010-06-10 15:27:35   | 
| 3     | 2010-06-10 16:39:36   | 
| 4     | 2010-06-11 14:55:30   | 
| 5     | 2010-06-11 18:45:31   | 
| 6     | 2010-06-12 20:25:31   | 
+-------+-----------------------+ 

I want to be able to count the dates (time is ignored). So the output should be like below:

+-------+-----------------------+ 
| id    | type         | count  |
+-------+-----------------------+ 
| 1     | 2010-06-10   | 3      |
| 2     | 2010-06-11   | 2      |
| 3     | 2010-06-12   | 1      |
+-------+-----------------------+

What would be the query for this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This works if you can live without the id column in the result:

SELECT DATE(timestamp) AS type, COUNT(*) AS `count`
FROM sometable
GROUP BY DATE(timestamp)
ORDER BY DATE(timestamp)
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Just wondering, when would you need a DISTINCT? –  MvanGeest Jun 30 '10 at 13:53
    
Uh... not here... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 30 '10 at 13:55
    
@MvanGeest, you don't need a distinct here because you are doing GROUP BY! –  VoodooChild Jun 30 '10 at 14:03
    
@VoodooChild: No, the reason you don't need DISTINCT here is because there are no joins. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 30 '10 at 14:09
    
@Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams: Well he could have done [SELECT DISTINCT (DATE(timestamp)) from sometable] INSTEAD OF [SELECT (DATE(timestamp) as t from sometable group by t], which would produce the same result. So in this sense, he would not need distinct when using group by! –  VoodooChild Jun 30 '10 at 14:29
SELECT
    DATE(timestamp),
    COUNT(*)
FROM
    My_Table
GROUP BY
    DATE(timestampe)

This doesn't give you a row number for each row. I don't know if (why?) that's important.

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select date(timestamp) as type, count(*)
from your_table
group by type;
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I doubt if alias name can be directly used in the GROUP BY Clause –  Madhivanan Jun 30 '10 at 14:06
    
@Madhivanan: MySQL supports the use of aliases from the SELECT clause in GROUP BY, ORDER BY, and HAVING clauses. From the manual: A select_expr can be given an alias using AS alias_name. The alias is used as the expression's column name and can be used in GROUP BY, ORDER BY, or HAVING clauses. –  Ike Walker Jun 30 '10 at 14:42
    
Ok. Thanks. It wont work in other RDBMSs –  Madhivanan Jun 30 '10 at 14:51

This might work...

select DATE(timestamp), count(timestamp)
    from _table
group by timestamp
order by count(timestamp) desc
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SELECT count( DATE_FORMAT( timestamp, '%Y-%m-%d/' ) ) , DATE_FORMAT( timestamp, '%Y-%m-%d' ) FROM tablename group by DATE_FORMAT( timestamp, '%Y-%m-%d' );

You can not include the id in the select or the count will be off.

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