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I'm still new to Linq so if you see something I really shouldn't be doing, please feel free to suggest a change.

I am working on a new system to allow officers to sign up for overtime. Part of the data is displayed on a map with search criteria filtering unwanted positions. In order to make the data easier to work with, it is read into a hierarchy object structure using Linq. In this example, a job can contain multiple shifts and each shift can have multiple positions available. The Linq statement to read them in looks like the following.

        var jobs = (from j in db.Job
                    join s in db.Shift on j.Id equals s.JobId into shifts
                    select new JobSearchResult
                    {
                        JobNumber = j.Id,
                        Name = j.JobName,
                        Latitude = j.LocationLatitude,
                        Longitude = j.LocationLongitude,
                        Address = j.AddressLine1,
                        Shifts = (from shift in shifts
                                  join p in db.Position on shift.Id equals p.ShiftId into positions
                                  select new ShiftSearchResult
                                  {
                                      Id = shift.Id,
                                      Title = shift.ShiftTitle,
                                      StartTime = shift.StartTime,
                                      EndTime = shift.EndTime,
                                      Positions = (from position in positions
                                                   select new PositionSearchResult
                                                   {
                                                       Id = position.Id,
                                                       Status = position.Status
                                                   }).ToList()
                                  }).ToList()
                    });

That works fine and has been tested. There may be a better way to do it and if you know of a way, feel free to suggest. My problem is this. After the query is created, search criteria will be added. I know that I could add it when the query is created but for this its easier to do it after. Now, I can easy add criteria that looks like this.

jobs = jobs.Where(j => j.JobNumber == 1234);

However, I am having trouble figuring out how to do the same for Shifts or Positions. In other words, how would I could it to add the condition that a shift starts after a particular time? The following example is what I am trying to accomplish but will not (obviously) work.

jobs = jobs.Shifts.Where(s = s.StartTime > JobSearch.StartTime)      //JobSearch.StartTime is a form variable.

Anyone have any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to filter the jobs based on the shifts or are you trying to filter the number of shifts under each job? –  Robin Day Jun 30 '10 at 14:29
    
It can be filtered by many different criteria. When does the shift start, how long is the shift, does the shift have an open position, where is the job located, who is the employer, etc... So a lot of different criteria. And yes, its possible a criteria may even be how many shifts a job has. Keep in mind a job could represent a church needing a crossing guard all the way up to managing all police officers working a Super Bowl. So the need for all sorts of search criteria is high. –  Bomlin Jun 30 '10 at 14:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Step 1: create associations so you can have the joins hidden behind EntitySet properties. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb629295.aspx

Step 2: construct your filters. You have 3 queryables and the possibility of filter interaction. Specify the innermost filter first so that the outer filters may make use of them.

Here are all jobs (unfiltered). Each job has only the shifts with 3 open positions. Each shift has those open positions.

Expression<Func<Position, bool>> PositionFilterExpression =
  p => p.Status == "Open";

Expression<Func<Shift, bool>> ShiftFilterExpression =
  s => s.Positions.Where(PositionFilterExpression).Count == 3  

Expression<Func<Job, bool>> JobFilterExpression =
  j => true

Step 3: put it all together:

   List<JobSearchResult> jobs = db.Jobs
     .Where(JobFilterExpression)
     .Select(j => new JobSearchResult
     { 
       JobNumber = j.Id, 
       Name = j.JobName, 
       Latitude = j.LocationLatitude, 
       Longitude = j.LocationLongitude, 
       Address = j.AddressLine1, 
       Shifts = j.Shifts
         .Where(ShiftFilterExpression)
         .Select(s => new ShiftSearchResult
         {
           Id = s.Id,
           Title = s.ShiftTitle,
           StartTime = s.StartTime,
           EndTime = s.EndTime,
           Positions = s.Positions
             .Where(PositionFilterExpression)
             .Select(p => new PositionSearchResult
             {
               Id = position.Id,
               Status = position.Status
             })
             .ToList() 
         })
         .ToList()
     })
     .ToList(); 
share|improve this answer
    
I was just playing around with going the Expression route but kept trying to do it after the query. I think this will work for me. I'll give it a try and let you know. –  Bomlin Jun 30 '10 at 15:43
    
Played around with this quite a bit. It was definitely along the right track. However, I was doing some checking and found out my method as well as the one above incurred a lot of SQL traffic so I'm going to rethink how I am doing this. Thanks for the code suggestion and I did learn some things from it so I'm going to give it the solution point. –  Bomlin Jul 1 '10 at 14:41

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