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I just discovered a subtle bug where I had an enum with two names unintentially sharing the same numeric value (in this case red=10 and crimson=10). I'm a bit surprised this isn't a syntax error.

public enum Colour
{
    Red=10,
    Blue=11,
    Green=12,
    Crimson=10
}
// Debug.Write(Colour.Red==Colour.Crimson) outputs True

Is there any real world reason why this behaviour might be a useful or do think it should be a syntax error?

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I thought I was so clever for thinking to ask this over three years after it was asked originally. –  MrBoJangles Sep 20 '13 at 21:12
    
See the MSDN guidelines for enum design: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229058.aspx In the spirit of these, I'd say that even though it's technically possible, it's probably not advised. –  Technobabble Oct 3 '13 at 21:18

14 Answers 14

up vote 34 down vote accepted
public enum Colour
{
    Red=10,
    Rouge=10,
    Blue=11,
    Bleu=11,
    Green=12,
    Vert=12,
    Black=13,
    Noir=13
}
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6  
And how would you use that? In a multilingual programming team, each member choosing his own constants? –  Henk Holterman Jun 30 '10 at 17:49
15  
I'm at a loss as to how this is an effective answer. –  Noldorin Jun 30 '10 at 22:47
3  
@Robin: Like @Noldorin, I fail to see how this is useful. Can you give an example using it? –  Henk Holterman Jul 1 '10 at 8:51
1  
Robin, OK, but the OQ was why it wasn't disallowed so we were looking for an example of why one should use this, not so much for how. –  Henk Holterman Jul 1 '10 at 10:46
1  
One should use it if one needs to use it. Example : I am working on a program that uses the current and some previous frames for video processing. I store the previous images in an array and I use enums for indexing. In one mode of operation I need 0 to be the previous image and in another mode I need 0 to be the left up image, 1 - right up, etc., and it is possible that I might need 0 to be some other image in a future implementation of another mode. In this case I use enums instead of magic numbers for indexing and I believe it will be cleaner that way. –  Dimitar Slavchev Apr 5 '12 at 10:07

I have seen that this feature is sometimes used for a "default" value:

public enum Scope
{
    Transient,
    Singleton,
    Default=Transient
}

But pay attention, this is only sugar for the user of your enum. Just because it is called Default it does not mean that it is the initial value.

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Enums are used like constans and you definitely can have two constants with the same value which are used in the same places. It can be so because of 3rd party API, because of backward compatibility ot just because of business rules.

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Beware! If your enum has multiple elements with the same value, you may get unexpected results when you use Enum.Parse(). Doing so will arbitrarily return the first element that has the requested value. For example, if you have enum Car { Ford = 1, Chevy = 1, Mazda = 1}, then (Car)Enum.Parse(typeof(Car), "1") will return Car.Ford. While that might be useful (I'm not sure why it would be), in most situations it's probably going to be confusing (especially for engineers maintaining the code) or easily overlooked when problems arise.

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Thank you for your first answer on SO, and it's a good one. May I suggest editing the text to add some additional white space and, in particular, to use markdown to highlight the code fragments? The easiest way to do the latter is to either surround the text with backtick (`) or use the code quote button in the formatting bar. I suspect that your upvote count may even rise if it's a little easier to read. Good luck. –  Simon Oct 3 '13 at 20:54

From the c# language spec:

Multiple enum members may share the same associated value. The example

enum Color 
{
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue,
    Max = Blue
}

shows an enum in which two enum members—Blue and Max—have the same associated value.

In this case you could check for MyColor == Color.Max which would be useful is some circumstances.

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1  
Max is an example of a sentinal value. This is not recommended per the MSDN design guidelines for enumerations because it violates the separation of concerns between the raw value and it's state. If the need ever arises to change what is considered Max, any references expecting Max to always equal Blue would need to be fixed. –  Technobabble Oct 3 '13 at 21:12

It's not a syntax error. All an enum does is enumerate a series of constants in a strongly-typed fashion.

Thus, if a developer mistypes (as in your example), as far as the CLR is concerned, that's a perfectly valid case. The CLR assumes that the developer knows what he's doing, and why he elected to do so.

As for real-world cases, I can't come up with any on the spur-of-the-moment, but I'm still certain that there probably are occasions where it'd be helpful.

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Sure there is, though it's perhaps not too common. If there is an entity/value that is commonly known under two different names, then that is a good reason.

The scenario you have presented is perhaps one such case. An even better one, straight from the BCL, is the System.Windows.Forms.MessageBoxIcon enum; the Stop, Error, and Hand members all have the same description and indeed the same value. Asterisk and Information are also identical, as suggested by the comments:

Asterisk    The message box contains a symbol consisting of a lowercase letter i in a circle.
Information The message box contains a symbol consisting of a lowercase letter i in a circle.

Hopefully this should give you a good idea of appropiate scenarios (your own probably being one).

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Enum is Enumeration of constant variables, and you can have two items with the same value,there is no reason to be a syntax error I think, however, this will cause compile error in this code

switch(c)
{
  Colour.Red:
     break;
  Colour.Crimson:
     break;
  ...
}
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It's worth knowing this. It's a reason not to deliberately use share names. –  AndyM Jun 30 '10 at 15:43
    
Agreed; two names with the same value is not an error. If you'd like to avoid it, do not specify the numeric values. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 30 '10 at 15:49

It's fine. You could have two values that are different from the point of view of the user of an API, but functionally can be treated as the same value.

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Using by named value as opposed to the actual value is root. Suppose you have French, English etc. with the same value. This is the root of enum to me.

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I've seen the same thing in a .net TWAIN wrapper - it allows all the TWAIN message codes to be stored in one big enum, but it does make things a bit confusing at first.

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I think there are many uses for re-using the same number. To give a new example, say you have a ranking system which will ensure that objects of a particular class (Parent) are created before other classes that are dependent on it (Children), you may have some children who are in the same 'tier' and it does not matter which one is created first. In the example below, Parent would be created first, Child 1, 2, or 3 next, then last would be Child4. If this were viewed as a tree diagram, any items with the same number would be 'siblings'.

public enum ObjectRanks
{
    Parent = 0,
    Child1 = 1,
    Child2 = 1,
    Child3 = 1,
    Child4 = 2
}

Although I can see your point of view in that this could be easy to do by mistake. In that case it would be handy if visual studio had an option to enable warnings which would let it compile but would raise a warning if the same number was used twice.

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It is sometimes recommended (although not recommended by MS for C#! - see Salaros's comment) to include a lower and upper bound in your enum such as

public enum Colour
{
    LowBound=10,
    Red=10,
    Rouge=10,
    Blue=11,
    Bleu=11,
    Green=12,
    Vert=12,
    Black=13,
    Noir=13,
    UpperBound=13
}

For the purposes of validation/iterating through each possible setting. Though I have a feeling that .Net may provide a facility for this :)

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The end of enumeration is a bound itself and you can iterate it in order of declaration: foreach(Foos foo in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Foos))) Actually it's recommended to avoid sentinel enumeration values (LowBound, UpperBound) msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/… –  Salaros Nov 24 '12 at 10:00
    
I was giving an example of where multiple items can share a value. In some languages you can't iterate an enum with foreach. Hardly deserving of a -1 but never mind! –  El Ronnoco Nov 26 '12 at 8:45
1  
We are talking about C# and not "other" languages, so if you teach somebody to code against the official specifications you deserve -1. I this way C# newbies won't learn wrong thins on C#. Anyway keep in mind that -1 is applied to both accounts, so this is not trolling: I'm just sacrificing my points in order to improve stackoverflow.. this is what we all supposed to do. –  Salaros Jan 14 '13 at 13:58
    
Yes it's a fair point. I was only being bemoaning the -1 for the sake of moaning. :) –  El Ronnoco Jan 14 '13 at 14:33

This is valid and allows one to refer same value with different names. Beware this works well oneway. You may get inconsistent results if you are converting from int/string to enum or while formatting strings.

Eg:

public enum Colour
{
    Red=10,
    Blue=11,
    Green=12,
    Crimson=10
}
Colour myColor = Colour.Crimson;
Console.WriteLine("Crimson is {0}", myColor.ToString());

Output:

Crimson is Red
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