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Consider a simple .NET form with a couple of radio buttons and a checkbox.

Each of the radio buttons has a CheckedChanged handler setup that performs some action based on the state of the checkbox.

My problem is, when I initialize on the default radiobutton to be checked (from the designer properties window) the CheckedChanged event is fired for that radio button, but the Checkbox hasn't been initialized yet so I either get a null pointer exception or the wrong value is used in the handler. Either way, I don't want that handler code to be run unless the user picks a radio button after the form has been loaded.

I currently get around this by not initializing the radio button, but I need to set that default eventually and the best place is from the designer. I also can add a boolean field that's not set to true until the form is fully loaded and not process the events if that is false, but it's a dirty hack.

What can I do to prevent that handler from running its code?

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This is a clear Visual Studio bug, in my opinion. Settign an initialization flag (as in x77's answer) is the easiest workaround, but it SHOULD be taken care of by the compiler. –  xpda Jun 30 '10 at 20:03
    
It is a known bug/feature. When you upgrade a VB6 project to VB.NET using the built-in upgrade tool in VS, it actually inserts UPGRADE_WARNING comments for this in these events. ('UPGRADE_WARNING: Event TextBox1.TextChanged may fire when form is initialized.) –  awe Jul 28 '10 at 7:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

"I also can but a boolean field that's not set to true until the form is fully loaded and not process the events if that is false, but it's a dirty hack."

It's also the easist and best way to do it!

Lets say .NET provides a neat way to turn an and off all the event handlers until the form is loaded. Even just the ones YOU are handling. It would still not be sufficiently flexible to disable what you wanted to enable but disable what you didn't. Often form setups happen and you want the events to fire. Also the form won't build right if no events fire.

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3  
Still feels dirty :) –  CodeFusionMobile Jun 30 '10 at 15:48
8  
I had to take a shower after I wrote this answer. –  FastAl Jun 30 '10 at 16:34

To make it feel slightly less dirty, if you initialize the controls in the constructor of the form you might be able to use the forms IsHandleCreated property rather than your own bool to check if it should actually validate or not.
I would think that normally you wouldn't want to validate anything before it's been shown for the first time and handle isn't created until it is.

Code Example:

Private Sub myRadioButton_CheckedChanged(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles myRadioButton.CheckedChanged
If myRadioButton.Checked AndAlso myRadioButton.IsHandleCreated Then
    'Do Work
End If
End Sub
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1  
Yes this is less dirty, and it works! I had the same problem, and checking for the forms IsHandleCreated in the events solved everything! –  awe Jul 29 '10 at 8:20
    
This should be the answer. –  Sire Dec 22 at 14:24

The easy solution is to declare an initializing variable:

  Private Initializing as boolean = True

  Private Sub rb_CheckedChanged(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles rbNuevos.CheckedChanged, RbDesaparecidos.CheckedChanged, RbModificados.CheckedChanged, RbNoDesap.CheckedChanged, RbDesHoy.CheckedChanged, RbChT.CheckedChanged
      if Initializing then return

      'Your Code    
  End Sub

  Public Sub New()

       ' Llamada necesaria para el Diseñador de Windows Forms.
       InitializeComponent()    
       ' Agregue cualquier inicialización después de la llamada a InitializeComponent().

       initializing = false
  end sub

Most sophisticated: Remove the "handles" from the method, and use AddHandler on the new method.

  Public Sub New()

       ' Llamada necesaria para el Diseñador de Windows Forms.
       InitializeComponent()    
       ' Agregue cualquier inicialización después de la llamada a InitializeComponent().

       AddHandler RbChT.CheckedChanged, AddressOf rb_CheckedChanged
  end sub
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To add the new method: Write : "Sub New" and press return –  x77 Jun 30 '10 at 16:07

One thing I've found that works is adding the events manually after you load the form.

To do this you can simply go into the generated form code found in the designer file of that form, and pull out the lines that add the event. It would look something like this:

this.controlName.CheckedChanged += new System.EventHandler(this.controlName_CheckedChanged);

Then put all of these calls into a method that you call after the InitializeComponent call in your form's constructor.

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Maybe for some functionality you can use the click event instead of the check changed event.

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Yet another way:

Private Sub dgvGroups_CellValueChanged(sender As System.Object, e As System.Windows.Forms.DataGridViewCellEventArgs) Handles dgvGroups.CellValueChanged

    If Me.Visible = False Then Exit Sub ' Sub gets called on form load which causes problems

    wksGroups.Cells(e.RowIndex + 1, 1) = dgvGroups.Item(e.ColumnIndex, e.RowIndex).Value
    wksGroups.Cells(1, 5) = dgvGroups.RowCount
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I put a public variable in the Module1 file Dim Public bolForm_LoadingTF as Boolean = True

In each formLoad event I put bolForm_LoadingTF = True

In each control with an OnSelectedIndexChanged event I put if bolForm_LoadingTF = True then Exit Sub

At the end of the form load event I put bolForm_LoadingTF = False

I am probably breaking a bunch of rules but this works for me.

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