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I'm creating a Class.

This class stores user preferences in a Struct.

When creating an instance of the class, I want the client to have the option of creating an instance with no preferences passed in or with a preferences struct passed in.

I can do this with pointers, but I wanted to know how I could do it by passing the preferences struct into the class by reference.

Either way, once the class receives the preferences it makes a copy for its own use.

Here's what it looks like with pointers

struct preferences {};
class Useful 
{
public:
    Useful(preferences const * = NULL);
...
}

...

int main() 
{
   preferences * testPrefs;
   ...
   Useful testClass(testPrefs);
   // or if no prefs: Useful testClass;
   ...
}

So how would you pass the preferences struct in by reference when creating an instance of the class with a default value of no struct passed in? This is the line I'm stuck on, since neither NULL nor *NULL will work:

class Useful 
{
public:
    Useful(preferences & = ???????);
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2  
you dont need default arguments for this, just write another overload with no arguments. if the initialization logic is quite long, you can add a private init function and call that in both constructors, so you dont have to repeat yourself. –  smerlin Jun 30 '10 at 19:52
    
Yeah. I think overloading constructors is the nicest option. This stuff's pretty new to me, and it was also a brain freeze... I think my brain was stuck in PHP :/ –  Peter Ajtai Jun 30 '10 at 19:59
    
Not directly related to your question, but don't pass by reference at all. If you're going to copy your preferences struct anyhow, just pass it by value and let the compiler worry about making the copy. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jun 30 '10 at 21:01
    
@Dennis Zickefoose - Passing into classes by value is generally not a good idea, since you often end up making two copies. The copy of the passed in struct that the copy constructor puts onto the stack will disappear when the function returns; therefore, if you want to use that struct in other functions / make it a member variable, you will end up making a second copy. –  Peter Ajtai Jul 1 '10 at 0:47
    
If you store the value, then yes, things are going to be a bit different. Based on your description, I had assumed it was simply a local value used to simulate named parameters. Sorry for the misunderstanding. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jul 1 '10 at 1:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You point out the advantage of pointers over references, and how well pointers fit your situation, then announce you don't want to use them.

You can still get what you want. Write two overloads for your constructor. One takes a reference, the other takes no parameters and does what the other constructor did when it got a null pointer.

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Well, I wanted to know how to do it. In this case pointers may work well, but in another case, passing by reference may work better. –  Peter Ajtai Jun 30 '10 at 19:24
    
And, as Gustavo V points out, using pass by reference eliminates a possible point of confusion by the client app as to whether they or the Useful class should delete their pointer. (& tks for the overloading constructors suggestion!) –  Peter Ajtai Jun 30 '10 at 19:51
Useful(const preferences& p = preferences(...));
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Nice. I'll have to remember that this is a possibility. –  Peter Ajtai Jun 30 '10 at 20:10

Create a static instance of the preferences struct with default values filled in, and use that as the default parameter. Or fill it with "magic" values that indicate it as a special reserved value.

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You could simply overload the constructor:

struct preferences {};
class Useful 
{
public:
    Useful(preferences&);
    Useful(); // In here, do whatever you would have done 
              // if preferences were NULL in the pointer example
}

That's essentially what the first version of the code with the pointer and default argument is doing anyway, behind the scenes.

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You must take care about who will be the owner of the "preferences" pointer, if you transfer the ownership the class must delete it in the destructor, if not, the caller must destroy it.

because this could give you lot of headaches I suggest use the reference pass parameters.

and as say Kate Gregory, you must define two constructors, in the 2nd you must copy the preferences to your own instance, at least that preference are only one and static set.

with an unique and static "preferences" you will have the trouble that other section of the code modified it and alter how your code works.

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