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This program adds two matrices but it's giving too many errors and I can't solve them.

Errors:

ARRAY BOUNDS MISSING

and

EXPRESSION SYNTAX

Any ideas?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

#define ROW=3
#define COL=3

int result[][COL];
void input(int arr[][COL]);
void add(int mat1[][COL],mat2[][COL]);
void print(int result[][COL]);

void main(void)
{
    int mat1[ROW][COL],mat2[ROW][COL];
    input(mat1);
    input(mat2);
    add(mat1,mat2);
    print(result);
    getch();
}

void input(int arr[][COL]);
{
    for(int i=0;i<row;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<col;j++)
        {
            printf("Enter element");
            scanf("%d",&arr[i][j]);
        }
}

void add(int mat1[][COL],int mat2[][COL])
{
    for(int i=0;i<row;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<col;j++)
        {
            result[i][j]=mat1[i][j]+mat2[i][j];
        }
}

void print(int result[][COL])
{
    for(int i=0;i<row;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<col;j++)
            printf("%d",result[i][j]);
}
share|improve this question
5  
Errors aren't just gibberish... If you post the text of the messages, it'll make it much easier for us to find the problem. (Human eyes don't make very good compilers). –  Cogwheel Jun 30 '10 at 21:26
3  
Be nice, everyone. You have 12k rep, so you can edit the brace formatting. @fahad: Please add the error messages. It will help us give you advice. –  Alan Jun 30 '10 at 21:30
2  
@fahad, It is generally considered rude (like screaming) to type in all caps. Please use normal case when typing unless you need to emphasize something. –  Chris Thompson Jun 30 '10 at 21:31
15  
I'm sorry, I'm having trouble controlling THE VOLUME OF MY VOICE... –  Charlie Salts Jun 30 '10 at 21:32
1  
Guys, please don't change the code when you edit for formatting (specifically changing ROW=3 to ROW 3 and removing syntax errors) since it invalidates the answers and isn't the same question. –  paxdiablo Jun 30 '10 at 22:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

That's not a bad first attempt. At least you tried before you asked for help, which is more than some do here. You have the following problems:

  • Your defines are of the wrong format.
  • You use non-standard stuff (conio).
  • You use lowercase row and col for the constants.
  • Your input function has an extraneous semi-colon.
  • You don't define result correctly.
  • The main function should always return an int.

In more detail:

(1) Your defines are of the wrong format.

You don't use = in defines since they're supposed to be relatively simple text substitutions. So the line #define ROW=3 is not want you want since that's basically trying to define the symbol ROW=3 to have an empty value.

To get a symbol ROW with a value 3, you need to use #define ROW 3.

Of course, in more modern code you would use static const int ROW = 3; since that would give you a first-class compiler symbol rather than just a text substitution. There really isn't any need to use pre-processor definitions for constants (use const) or functions (use inline) nowadays.

(2) You use non-standard stuff (conio).

ISO C (the standard) does not include a conio.h header file. I understand that you're using it so that you can use the getch function but ISO C provides a perfectly adequate getchar function which serves the same purpose here.

It's okay to use extensions to the language, just be aware that they generally make your code less portable.

(3) You use lowercase row and col for the constants.

Since you've used uppercase ROW and COL for your row and column constants, you should use uppercase in your for statements. C is a case-sensitive language and using row and col will cause the compiler to complain that they don't exist.

(4) Your input function has an extraneous semi-colon.

This is just a misplaced ; in the first line of that function, at the end of the line containing the function devclaration.

(5) You don't define result correctly.

The result variable should have a definite size. The definition int result[][10]; is what's known as an incomplete type since the size cannot be known.

(6) The main function should always return an int.

There are two standard forms of the main function in C. Those are:

int main(void);
int main (int c, char *v[]);

Others are allowed to be provided by the implementation but, if you want code that will run anywhere, you should limit yourself to one of those.


This gets rid of all your syntax errors, now you can work on making the interface less ugly :-)

#include<stdio.h>

#define ROW 3
#define COL 3

int result[ROW][COL];
void input(int arr[][COL]);
void add(int mat1[][COL],int mat2[][COL]);
void print(int result[][COL]);

int main(void)
{
    int mat1[ROW][COL],mat2[ROW][COL];
    input(mat1);
    input(mat2);
    add(mat1,mat2);
    print(result);
    getchar();
    return 0;
}
void input(int arr[][COL])
{
    for(int i=0;i<ROW;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<COL;j++)
        {
            printf("Enter element");
            scanf("%d",&arr[i][j]);
        }
}
void add(int mat1[][COL],int mat2[][COL])
{
    for(int i=0;i<ROW;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<COL;j++)
            result[i][j]=mat1[i][j]+mat2[i][j];
}
void print(int result[][COL])
{
    for(int i=0;i<ROW;i++)
        for(int j=0;j<COL;j++)
            printf("%d",result[i][j]);
}

Some suggestions for making it nicer:

  • Make it more obvious which value you're entering by showing the matrix number and co-ordinates.
  • Make it print spaces between the output numbers.
  • Make it print newlines between the output lines.
  • Make it print the numbers fixed width (to line up nicely).
  • Comment your code (I can't stress this enough).
share|improve this answer
    
•You use non-standard stuff (conio): what shd i be using? i mean which header? why used return 0? –  Shen Xu Jun 30 '10 at 21:55
1  
You also should never use void main(). main ALWAYS, by the standard, has a return type of int. –  David Thornley Jun 30 '10 at 21:59
    
dint get u david –  Shen Xu Jun 30 '10 at 22:01
1  
@fahad, conio is not standard (ISO) C. You use it in this code for the getch function but that's not necessary since ISO C provides getchar for that purpose (from stdio.h which you already include). And there are only two guaranteed main prototypes, both of which should return an int. –  paxdiablo Jun 30 '10 at 22:03
    
my teacher told me to do so ..i am a very beginner and i dont even get much what you teach here.Thanks a lot :) –  Shen Xu Jun 30 '10 at 22:06

First thing that pops out now that the code is formatted:

#define ROW=3
#define COL=3

should be

#define ROW 3
#define COL 3
share|improve this answer
#define ROW=3
#define COL=3

is incorrect for the C preprocessor. Try:

#define ROW 3
#define COL 3

See this page for more information on how to use the preprocessor.

share|improve this answer
    
not #define ROW [3]? –  Shen Xu Jun 30 '10 at 21:34
    
No, because then there would be extra brackets. –  Cogwheel Jun 30 '10 at 21:36
1  
@fahad: #define is a text search and replace. Everytime it encounters the word "ROW", the preprocessor will replace it with what comes after. In your case, you would end up with int mat[[3]... which makes no sense –  Yann Ramin Jun 30 '10 at 21:36

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