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Consider the problem of counting the number of structurally distinct binary search trees:

Given N, find the number of structurally distinct binary search trees containing the values 1 .. N

It's pretty easy to give an algorithm that solves this: fix every possible number in the root, then recursively solve the problem for the left and right subtrees:

countBST(numKeys)
    if numKeys <= 1
        return 1
    else
        result = 0
        for i = 1 .. numKeys
            leftBST = countBST(i - 1)
            rightBST = countBST(numKeys - i)

            result += leftBST * rightBST

        return result

I've recently been familiarizing myself with treaps, and I posed the following problem to myself:

Given N, find the number of distinct treaps containing the values 1 .. N with priorities 1 .. N. Two treaps are distinct if they are structurally different relative to EITHER the key OR the priority (read on for clarification).

I've been trying to figure out a formula or an algorithm that can solve this for a while now, but I haven't been successful. This is what I noticed though:

  1. The answers for n = 2 and n = 3 seem to be 2 and 6, based on me drawing trees on paper.
  2. If we ignore the part that says treaps can also be different relative to the priority of the nodes, the problem seems to be identical to counting just binary search trees, since we'll be able to assign priorities to each BST such that it also respects the heap invariant. I haven't proven this though.
  3. I think the hard part is accounting for the possibility to permute the priorities without changing the structure. For example, consider this treap, where the nodes are represented as (key, priority) pairs:

              (3, 5)
              /    \ 
         (2, 3)    (4, 4)
         /              \
    (1, 1)               (5, 2)
    

    We can permute the priorities of both the second and third levels while still maintaining the heap invariant, so we get more solutions even though no keys switch place. This probably gets even uglier for bigger trees. For example, this is a different treap from the one above:

              (3, 5)
              /    \ 
         (2, 4)    (4, 3) // swapped priorities
         /              \
    (1, 1)               (5, 2)
    

I'd appreciate if anyone can share any ideas on how to approach this. It seemed like an interesting counting problem when I thought about it. Maybe someone else thought about it too and even solved it!

share|improve this question
    
You didn't actually define structural similarity for treaps -- you just gave examples. –  Ken Bloom Jul 1 '10 at 3:33
    
The answer for n=3 is 5: the 3rd Catalan number. Your algorithm is correct, but you reported the wrong number in your answer. –  Ken Bloom Jul 1 '10 at 3:50
    
@Ken. I think it is quite clear what IVlad meant by structural similarity, based on his initial algorithm and the statement: "We can permute the priorities of both the second and third levels while still maintaining the heap invariant, so we get more solutions...". Anyway, I guess he will clarify. –  Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 5:48
    
@Ken Bloom - I did define it: Given N, find the number of distinct treaps containing the values 1 .. N with priorities 1 .. N. Two treaps are distinct if they are structurally different relative to EITHER the key OR the priority (read on for clarification).. Then I clarified it through examples. The answer for n = 3 is not 5, because we can get another valid treap by permuting the priorities of one of those 5 you're thinking of. –  IVlad Jul 1 '10 at 8:14
    
Sorry I got confused. I thought the n=5 was supposed to be the answer to countBST, now I see I misread. As far as the definition, it was unclear to me what "structurally different relative to the priority" meant, and you didn't give any example large enough to clarify what my first example clarified, so I made an assumption and went with it. –  Ken Bloom Jul 1 '10 at 12:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Interesting question! I believe the answer is N factorial!

Given a tree structure, there is exactly one way to fill in the binary search tree key values.

Thus all we need to do is count the different number of heaps.

Given a heap, consider an in-order traversal of the tree.

This corresponds to a permutation of the numbers 1 to N.

Now given any permutation of {1,2...,N}, you can construct a heap as follows:

Find the position of the largest element. The elements to its left form the left subtree and the elements to its right form the right subtree. These subtrees are formed recursively by finding the largest element and splitting there.

This gives rise to a heap, as we always choose the max element and the in-order traversal of that heap is the permutation we started with. Thus we have a way of going from a heap to a permutaion and back uniquely.

Thus the required number is N!.

As an example:

    5
   / \
  3   4          In-order traversal ->   35142
     / \ 
     1  2

Now start with 35142. Largest is 5, so 3 is left subtree and 142 is right.

    5
   / \
  3  {142}

In 142, 4 is largest and 1 is left and 2 is right, so we get

    5
   / \
  3   4
     / \
    1   2

The only way to fill in binary search keys for this is:

    (2,5)
   /     \
(1,3)    (4,4)
        /     \
       (3,1)   (5,2)

For a more formal proof:

If HN is the number of heaps on 1...N, then we have that

HN = Sum_{L=0 to N-1} HL * HN-1-L * (N-1 choose L)

(basically we pick the max and assign to root. Choose the size of left subtree, and choose that many elements and recurse on left and right).

Now,

H0 = 1
H1 = 1
H2 = 2
H3 = 6

If Hn = n! for 0 ≤ n ≤ k

Then HK+1 = Sum_{L=0 to K} L! * (K-L)! * (K!/L!*(K-L)!) = (K+1)!

share|improve this answer
    
Please explain how you define structural similarity. If you define it the way I do, then your answer is wrong. –  Ken Bloom Jul 1 '10 at 4:17
    
@Ken. Recursive definition. T1 is same as T2, if and only if T1.LeftTree is same as T2.LeftTree and T1.RightTree is same as T2.RightTree and T1.RootValue is same as T2.RootValue. Base case: Single nodes with same value are the same and with different values are different. Note: the values here are ordered pairs (key, priority). If you ignore the priority, then the number of distinct trees comes out to be same as catalan numbers, but that is not what the question is about. Also, with this definition, trees and their mirror images are different. –  Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 5:33
    
@Moron's definition is correct. Interesting solution. It looks correct. I'll think about it for a bit then accept this answer if no one can find anything wrong with it (you know, peer review :)). +1. –  IVlad Jul 1 '10 at 8:30
def countBST(numKeys:Long):Long = numKeys match {
  case 0L => 1L
  case 1L => 1L
  case _ => (1L to numKeys).map{i=>countBST(i-1) * countBST(numKeys-i)}.sum
}

You didn't actually define structural similarity for treaps -- you just gave examples. I'm going to assume the following definition: two trees are structurally different if and only if they have a different shape, or there exist nodes a (from tree A) and b (from tree B) such that a and b are in the same position, and the priorities of the children of a are in the opposite order of the priorities of the children of b. (It's obvious that if two treaps on the same values have the same shape, then the values in corresponding nodes are the same.)

In other words, if we visualize two trees by just giving the priorities on the nodes, the following two trees are structurally similar:

      7               7
   6      5        6      5
  4 3    2 1      2 1    4 3  <--- does not change the relative order
                                   of the children of any node
                                   6's left child is still greater than 6's right child
                                   5's left child is still greater than 5's right child

but the following two trees are structurally different:

      7               7
   5      6        6      5   <--- changes the relative order of the children
  4 3    2 1      4 3    2 1       of node 7

Thus for the treap problem, each internal node has 2 orderings, and these two orderings do not otherwise affect the shape of the tree. So...

def countTreap(numKeys:Long):Long = numKeys match {
  case 0L => 1L
  case 1L => 1L
  case _ => 2 * countBST(numKeys-1) +  //2 situations when the tree has only 1 child
            2 * (2L to (numKeys-1)).map{i=>countBST(i-1) * countBST(numKeys-i)}.sum
            // and for each situation where the tree has 2 children, this node  
            // contributes 2 orderings the priorities of its children
            // (which is independent of the shape of the tree below this level)
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, your first two example treaps would still be considered different because there exist some priorities that changed place. –  IVlad Jul 1 '10 at 8:26
    
@IVlad: that's the clarification I needed. I'm not going to edit my answer, since @Moron already answered for that definition, people might as well see my definition as well. –  Ken Bloom Jul 1 '10 at 12:52
    
Yes, your approach is also definitely interesting :). Thanks for your help! –  IVlad Jul 1 '10 at 13:27

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