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I'm working on C program. There is a function which takes two pointer argument and does some complex works. Let's say it as 'cmp'. cmp() is never complex for the illustrative reason.

int cmp(struct foo *a, struct foo *b) {
    return (a->bar == b->bar);
}

I'd like to make a NULL-check macro, like this:

#define SAFE_CMP(a,b) ((a) != NULL && (b) != NULL) ? cmp(a,b) : 0

I think this is perfectly fine. However, in -Wall compliation switch that regards a warning as error, following codes are troublesome:

int baz(struct foo *a) {
   struct foo b;
   ...
   return SAFE_CMP(a, &b); 
}

since gcc warns "the address of b will never be NULL".

Is there any way to workaround this situation? Having various helper macro like SAFE_CMP_1(safe_arg,unsafe_arg), SAFE_CMP_2(unsafe_arg,safe_arg)... is the last thing I want. I'd like to have one helper macro appricable to all situation.

Thanks in advance.

Chul-Woong Yang

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You could probably use one of the GCC pragmas to disable that warning for the null-check part of the macro, and then re-enable it. –  Anon. Jul 1 '10 at 3:03
3  
I don't see what this is buying you. Why can't the cmp() function just make these checks? –  BobbyShaftoe Jul 1 '10 at 3:03

3 Answers 3

This seems to suppress the warning for me:

#define SAFE_CMP(a,b) ((void *)(a) != NULL && (void *)(b) != NULL) ? cmp(a,b) : 0

...but personally, I would just create safe_cmp() as a function itself.

int safe_cmp(struct foo *a, struct foo *b) {
    return (a && b) ? (a->bar == b->bar) : 0;
}
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cmp() in my actual working source is macro also. I think it's better to write into inline function. Very thanks[ –  cwyang Jul 1 '10 at 4:45
    
I'd vote this post up more than once if I could! This warning caused me some headache, and the (void*) cast trick may just save the day. –  m01 Jul 18 '13 at 8:57
    
Incidentally, it looks like you can typecast to other pointer types, too, to suppress the warning. –  m01 Jul 18 '13 at 9:54

"I'd like to have one helper macro appricable to all situation."

Why? One size does not fit all. GCC is doing you a favor by telling you a comparison will always have a certain result. The address of a stack variable will never be NULL. I would just write out the check in baz:

int baz(struct foo *a) {
   struct foo b;
   ...
   return a == NULL ? 0 : cmp(a, &b);
}

You could also do it in cmp. It depends how you define the pre and post-conditions.

Another possible issue with your macro (not applicable for baz) is that a and b will be evaluated multiple times. Beware of:

SAFE_CMP(p++, p1++);
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I think It's a matter of taste. I'd personally favor all-in-one approach. I'll be happy if gcc checks null whenever I pass two dynamic pointer value. However when I pass static pointer value using that macro, I want gcc not to check and produce such an annoyuing warning. It's obvious that "return SAFE_CMP(a, &b);" is more clear and readable than "return a == NULL ? 0 : cmp(a, &b);" Anyway thanks for your kind reply. Thank you. –  cwyang Jul 1 '10 at 4:42

The gcc option -Wno-address seems to remove the warnings.

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