Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was just wondering if there is any way to get out of a Java block. It can be any block - if block, for block or even a simple {}. This is because I often come across such situations

{
  retCode = performSomeThing();
  if(retCode == SUCCESS)
  {
    retCode = performSomethingElse();
    if(retCode == SUCCESS)
    {
         . . . 
          . . . 
    }
   }
}

This multiple levels of indentation clutters up the code I write.

Instead I need some way to do this

if((retCode = performSomething()) != SUCCESS)
  GET_OUT_OF_BLOCK
if((retCode = performSomethingElse()) != SUCCESS)
  GET_OUT_OF_BLOCK

Based on the value of retCode I will perform any required processing outside the block. Would be nice if it doesn't involve writing that block within a try-catch block, creating a new exception type, throwing it and then catching it.

share|improve this question
2  
Where is my object-oriented goto? –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 1 '10 at 10:59
    
There actually is goto in Java. If I catch you using it I'll lob off your ears. –  defines Jul 1 '10 at 11:28
2  
@Dustin: It's impossible to use goto in Java - it's a reserved word (i.e. not a legal identifier), but not actually used for anything. –  Michael Borgwardt Jul 1 '10 at 11:38
2  
Impossible is nothing. Hard core programmers code byte code directly and frequently use the goto opcode.. –  emory Jul 1 '10 at 12:07
    
@emory, that makes this a related question. –  Pops Jul 1 '10 at 14:37
show 2 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The correct construct to use is return. This implies that what is a block in your example should really be a method, but that is a good idea anyway - methods that are so long that they contain multiple, complicated control flow alternatives are an antipattern. Do yourself a favor and switch to "one objective per method" today! <end of evangelism>

share|improve this answer
add comment

have a look at break and continue

share|improve this answer
    
The only other correct answer, how is this not getting voted up? –  defines Jul 1 '10 at 11:26
    
I would if I could :) –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 1 '10 at 15:54
add comment

Use labels and break statements.

label: if (something) {
             break label;
        }
share|improve this answer
5  
While perfectly legal, I don't this approach is recommended. It can easily get very complicated and confusing. –  C. Ross Jul 1 '10 at 10:32
add comment

You seem to use the nested ifs here for error handling.

If you switch to structured exception handling, maybe you could get rid of the deeply nested if constructs at all.

This would, however, imply that performSomeThing() and performSomethingElse() would throw exceptions instead of returning error codes.

share|improve this answer
2  
Using exceptions for non-exceptional conditions or control flow is definitely not recommended. –  eljenso Jul 1 '10 at 11:19
    
+1 This is exactly what exceptions are for. –  sleske Jul 1 '10 at 11:20
    
@eljenso: Well, if you need to abort processing because an operation was not successful, that would be a good case for using an exception. But it's always a bit of a judgment call... –  sleske Jul 1 '10 at 11:21
    
Exceptions are for crash-and-burn situations. If you now beforehand that some operation may fail (for example due to certain values in your data) and you know you have to deal with it (validation) then using an exception is the wrong choice. So probably the best solution here would be return codes (as the OP did) + unchecked exceptions. –  eljenso Jul 1 '10 at 11:28
1  
@eljenso: Exceptions are perfectly fine for validation errors when it makes sense to have them propagate up the call stack. The decision between exceptions and return codes should not be based on hair-splitting about what exactly is an "exceptional situation", but about what leads to better design. Error codes that must not be ignored and have to be passed around are bad, no matter what causes them. –  Michael Borgwardt Jul 1 '10 at 11:43
show 3 more comments

<again evangelism>

Don't do that. In my opinion the correct way for a bloc is one start at the beginning, one stop at the end, full stop.

Even with a method, you should have only one return at the end.

Inside the bloc, you write the flow of the running instructions with if and so on, from the start to the end, the more simple you can (so, sometimes, you write return or break etc inside it, ok ; it should be exception).

It's best (but not mandatory) to write normal completion statements.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 for providing a personal opinion rather than a technically correct answer –  Pops Jul 1 '10 at 14:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.