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I am trying to do something like this:

SELECT a.date AS EnrollDate, a.id, a.name, b.address FROM student a JOIN Location b ON a.id=b.id  
UNION  
SELECT a.date AS EnrollDate, a.id, a.name, b.address FROM teacher a JOIN Location b ON a.id=b.id  
WHERE a.date>'2010-01-01'  
ORDER BY EnrollDate

But the WHERE condition applies to the second SELECT statement only. I need to somehow apply to both the SELECT. The only option I have now is to apply WHERE condition individually. But I am working with several UNIONs and it is kind of tedious to include WHERE in all the places. I was wondering if there is an easy way out.

By the way, I am working with MySQL.

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accept the ans if it work for you –  Pranay Rana Jul 31 '10 at 4:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT a.date AS EnrollDate, a.id, a.name, b.address FROM student a JOIN Location b ON a.id=b.id  
  UNION  
  SELECT a.date AS EnrollDate, a.id, a.name, b.address FROM teacher a JOIN Location b ON a.id=b.id  
) A
WHERE EnrollDate > '2010-01-01'  
ORDER BY EnrollDate

This also has the advantage, compared to individual ORDER BY's that the whole result is correctly ordered.

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Well, same answer :P good work mate –  Hal Jul 1 '10 at 10:32
    
Thanks mate. You solved my problem :) –  jitendra Jul 1 '10 at 10:40
    
By the way, the WHERE clause should use EnrollDate instead of a.date for comparison ;) –  jitendra Jul 1 '10 at 10:43
    
Very true, fixed that! –  Janick Bernet Jul 1 '10 at 10:44
1  
Note that this (at least in my case) does not specify the conditions on the tables separately, it performs the where query on the whole result set, thus considering rows which are then thrown away. In my case (10M rows total) it not a solution to use it this way... –  NoICE Apr 14 at 12:32

Have you tried something like:

SELECT * FROM 
(
    SELECT a.date AS EnrollDate, a.id, a.name, b.address FROM student a JOIN Location b ON a.id=b.id  
    UNION  
    SELECT a.date AS EnrollDate, a.id, a.name, b.address FROM teacher a JOIN Location b ON a.id=b.id 
) A
    WHERE a.date>'2010-01-01'  
    ORDER BY EnrollDate
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You have to either give the subquery an alias or replace the 'a.date' with simply 'date'. –  Janick Bernet Jul 1 '10 at 10:30
    
yeah, i forgot. fixed it in the edit –  Hal Jul 1 '10 at 10:31

You could select into a temporary table, then select from the temporary table with the where clause.

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Why the downvote? –  Oded Jul 1 '10 at 10:31

There is no way around it, you have to repeat the WHERE for each individual select clause.

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1  
Ok, looking at the other answers, my answer is wrong as it states there is no way around it. However, from a performance point of view, I would assume all the solutions of first UNIONing and then evaluating the WHERE condition will probably be worse (if you do not have a really clever optimizer, which I would not assume for MySql). –  Frank Jul 1 '10 at 10:52
    
Applying the WHERE to each part individually is only better if there's an index available for it to use. Also note that UNION is slower than UNION ALL, because it has the extra step of removing duplicates. –  Brilliand Jul 22 '13 at 15:31

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