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I'm a Java developer who has turned to the dark side over the last couple of weeks as I've been trying to write some code in PHP for the first time ever.

Most stuff seems familiar, methods become functions, . becomes ->, variables have a $ in front and you never have any idea what type they are, I get it, but I'm totally stumped by the $this keyword.

I expect $this to call a function in the current class as in java this.myCoolMethod(), but often as I poke through the open source project I'm going through, $this->myCoolMethod() calls a function in a totally different class!

What is happening here? What does '$this' actually mean?

Thank you for any help.

John

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1  
(reference) PHP Classes and Object - The Basics –  Gordon Jul 1 '10 at 10:42
1  
$this references the same class instance, not the same class. –  Gumbo Jul 1 '10 at 10:45
    
Thanks everyone, I get inheritence from the Java world but in java land we use the super keyword to refer to the super class instance or parents of, and we use the this keyword to refer to methods belonging to the current class instance only NOT including parent members of that class hence the confusion. Cheers! –  John Deverall Jul 1 '10 at 11:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason it sometimes calls a method in a totally different class, is because that class probably extended another class with that method.

Here is a quick example:

class bla {
  public function __construct() {}

  public function whatwhat() {
    echo "what....";
  }
}

class lala extends bla {
  public function __construct() {}
}


$lalaObj = new lala();

$lala->whatwhat();

As you can see, even though whatwhat() isn't in the class, it inherits it from the class it extends.

Hope that helps.

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Thanks everyone, I get inheritence from the Java world but in java land we use the super keyword to refer to the super class instance or parents of, and we use the this keyword to refer to methods belonging to the current class instance only NOT including parent members of that class hence the confusion. Cheers! –  John Deverall Jul 1 '10 at 11:16

You should take a look at what Inheritance is.

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why did i get downvoted? this community is getting plain stupid. –  Luca Matteis Jul 1 '10 at 10:44
    
Downvoted. Java orgasms inheritance- anyone who's written a shred of Java knows exactly what inheritance is. –  Puppy Jul 1 '10 at 10:44
    
DeadMG, what are you talking about? did you even read the question? –  Luca Matteis Jul 1 '10 at 10:46
    
Yes, inheritance is pretty important within Java. However, I don't think the above comment was meant in malice. If it were though, then it definitely would deserve down-voting. A more helpful piece of advice would be to take a look at what scope is ;-) –  Martin Bean Jul 1 '10 at 10:46
    
Hi Luca, yeah DeadMG is kinda right, no java programmer needs to be told what inheritence is, java orgasms inheritence is a fair comment, although it was your answer (the first one) that gave me the clue that the this keyword functioned differently in PHP to the way it does in Java so I've upvoted you again =) –  John Deverall Jul 1 '10 at 11:21

$this, within a method, refers to the object to which the method belongs. If an object belongs to a class that extends another class, then it may inherit methods from the parent class, which may be called using $this->method_name(), just as with any other method.

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$this actually refers to the current instance of the class.

$this->myCoolMethod() calls a function in a totally different class!

Can you provide an example of this? The only circumstance in which the myCoolMethod() might not be defined in the class itself is if it is defined in a parent or inherited class

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Thanks Mark, this helped get me on the right track –  John Deverall Jul 1 '10 at 11:26

$this refers to whatever instance you're in. So if I extended Class_A to become Class B, and called methodName within Class_B, that would invoke Class_B::methodName and not Class_A::methodName.

I'm not sure how to explain clearer without knowing what context you're having difficulties, but try echoing __CLASS__ next to where you're using $this to give you the current class's name you're in.

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