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    #menu {
      position:fixed;
      width:800px;
      background: rgb(255, 255, 255); /* The Fallback */
      background: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.8);
      margin-top:30px;
    }

i know this question is a million times out there, however I can't find a solution to my case. i got a div, which should be fixed on the screen, even if the page is scrolled it should always stay CENTERED in the middle of the screen!

so the div should have 500px width, should be 30px away from the top (margin-top), should be horizontally centered in the middle of the page for all browsersizes and should not move when scrolling the rest of the page.

is that possible?

share|improve this question
    
See also stackoverflow.com/questions/17069435/… – ringø Jun 19 '14 at 10:21
up vote 112 down vote accepted
left: 50%;
margin-left: -400px; /* Half of the width */
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 clever, hadn't thought of that! – Pekka 웃 Jul 1 '10 at 11:45
9  
it doesn't work as intended when you resize the browser window. – user126284 Aug 27 '11 at 4:37
2  
@Bahodir: Are you sure? It looks right to me on resize. I think this -400 is due to the width of the div being set to 800. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Dec 11 '11 at 11:19
1  
@YatharthROCK — Because the username has changed in the last 6 months (presumably because the account was deleted). – Quentin Jul 1 '12 at 14:55
1  
@Quentin, this holds no advantage over using a transform and has limited usage. A transform would work better and is a better practice. In a responsive age it's bad practice to teach people to hard code these values. I agree that in 2010 this was the correct answer, it just isn't anymore. – Preston Badeer Feb 17 at 15:29

The answers here are outdated. Now you can easily use a CSS3 transform without hardcoding a margin. This works on all elements, including elements with no width or dynamic width.

Horizontal center:

left: 50%;
transform: translateX(-50%);

Vertical center:

top: 50%;
transform: translateY(-50%);

Both horizontal and vertical:

left: 50%;
top: 50%;
transform: translate(-50%, -50%);

Compatibility is not an issue: http://caniuse.com/#feat=transforms2d

share|improve this answer
    
I implemented your answer, with a draggable element, and a problem came up. I posted the question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/34073485/… – Jessica Dec 3 '15 at 19:30
4  
+1 This answer demonstrates an issue with stackoverflow: Old answers that were good for their day and were rightly accepted can sit proudly on top giving the impression they're still appropriate, while great answers for a newer world, like this one, have to fight their way up against the odds. – Nick Rice May 4 at 5:42
    
@NickRice 100% agreed. This answer should be the new accepted answer. Junior devs shouldn't even see the current accepted answer! – Nate I May 5 at 18:05
    
@matt please accept this one instead. Scroll far to long to see this. – ssbb Jul 1 at 13:11
    
This makes a blur effects in box shadow in content elements. – rab Jul 3 at 11:13

If using inline-blocks is an option I would recommend this approach:

.container { 
    /* fixed position a zero-height full width container */
    position: fixed;
    top: 0; /* or whatever position is desired */
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    height: 0;
    /* center all inline content */
    text-align: center;
}

.container > div {
    /* make the block inline */
    display: inline-block;
    /* reset container's center alignment */
    text-align: left;
} 

I wrote a short post on this here: http://salomvary.github.com/position-fixed-horizontally-centered.html

share|improve this answer
1  
10x, this worked great for me w/o having to hard-code any numbers for width or something -- unlike @Quentins answer – YatharthROCK Jul 1 '12 at 15:08
    
Great answer, thank you! – Petr Abdulin Sep 20 '12 at 16:09
    
Thanks for the great answer ! – bertie Apr 11 '14 at 3:35

Another way not to have to calculate a margin or need a sub-container:

#menu {
    position: fixed;   /* Take it out of the flow of the document */
    left: 0;           /* Left edge at left for now */
    right: 0;          /* Right edge at right for now, so full width */ 
    top: 30px;         /* Move it down from top of window */
    width: 500px;      /* Give it the desired width */ 
    margin: auto;      /* Center it */
    max-width: 100%;   /* Make it fit window if under 500px */ 
    z-index: 10000;    /* Whatever needed to force to front (1 might do) */
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works, you'll want to add bottom: 0; though. – Joey Dec 11 '14 at 3:46
    
@Joey What does the bottom:0 do? ie why is it needed? (It's some time since I looked at this!) – Nick Rice Dec 11 '14 at 11:29
    
bottom:0 would ensure the menu is always vertically centered, but I see now that's not what the OP asked for. :) – Joey Dec 11 '14 at 16:48
    
I tried to use this in a different context byt figured out it doesn't center in FF if the elements height is higher than the window(viewport) height – Philipp Werminghausen May 11 '15 at 17:29
    
This is the best answer! Works great. – frank Oct 18 '15 at 13:57

... or you can wrap you menu div in another:

    <div id="wrapper">
       <div id="menu">
       </div>
    </div>


#wrapper{
         width:800px;
         background: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.8);
         margin:30px auto;
         border:1px solid red;
    }

    #menu{
        position:fixed;
        border:1px solid green;
        width:300px;
        height:30px;
    }
share|improve this answer

It is possible to horisontally center the div this way:

html:

<div class="container">
    <div class="inner">content</div>
</div>

css:

.container {
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0; /* or top: 0, or any needed value */
    position: fixed;
    z-index: 1000; /* or even higher to prevent guarantee overlapping */
}

.inner {
    max-width: 600px; /* just for example */
    margin: 0 auto;
}

Using this way you will have always your inner block centered, in addition it can be easily turned to true responsive (in the example it will be just fluid on smaller screens), therefore no limitation in as in the question example and in the chosen answer.

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Here's another two-div solution. Tried to keep it concise and not hardcoded. First, the expectable html:

<div id="outer">
  <div id="inner">
    content
  </div>
</div>

The principle behind the following css is to position some side of "outer", then use the fact that it assumes the size of "inner" to relatively shift the latter.

#outer {
  position: fixed;
  left: 50%;          // % of window
}
#inner {
  position: relative;
  left: -50%;         // % of outer (which auto-matches inner width)
}

This approach is similar to Quentin's, but inner can be of variable size.

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