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This is not a homework. Just an interesting task :)

Given a complete binary search three represensted by array. Sort the array in O(n) using constant memory.

Example:

Tree:

              8
           /     \
          4       12
         /\       / \
        2  6     10  14
       /\  /\    /\   /\
      1 3 5  7  9 11 13 15

Array: 8, 4, 12, 2, 6, 10, 14, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15

Output: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

share|improve this question
    
is it always perfectly balanced? – astorcas Jul 1 '10 at 13:19
3  
@astorcas: even better, it's always complete. – polygenelubricants Jul 1 '10 at 13:23
    
If it is always complete using numbers from 1..N you could just write the values 1..N to the input array. So I'm guessing thats not going to cut it? – Nick Larsen Jul 1 '10 at 13:30
1  
@NickLarsen: That array was just an example, we cannot infer that the numbers are 1..N from that. In any case, assuming that will make the question silly. – Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 13:38
    
@I__: Why are you tagging this as homework? Besides, tagging with 'meta' tags is now frowned upon: blog.stackoverflow.com/2010/08/the-death-of-meta-tags – Aryabhatta Aug 9 '10 at 18:36
up vote 22 down vote accepted

It is possible, people calling it homework probably haven't tried solving it yet.

We use the following as a sub-routine:

Given an array a1 a2 ... an b1 b2 .. bn, convert in O(n) time and O(1) space to

b1 a1 b2 a2 ... bn an

A solution for that can be found here: http://arxiv.org/abs/0805.1598

We use that as follows.

Do the above interleaving for the first 2^(k+1) - 2 elements, starting at k=1 repeating for k=2, 3 etc, till you go past the end of array.

For example in your array we get (interleaving sets identified by brackets)

 8, 4, 12, 2, 6, 10, 14, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15   
[ ][ ]

 4, 8, 12, 2, 6, 10, 14, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15   (k = 1, interleave 2)
[        ][        ]  

 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15   (k = 2, interleave 6)
[                      ][                     ]

 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15   (k = 3, interleave 14)

So the total time is n + n/2 + n/4 + ... = O(n). Space used is O(1).

That this works can be proved by induction.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks good. It still does sound like a homework question though :) – Janick Bernet Jul 1 '10 at 13:20
1  
@inflagranti: Have to disagree completely about it being homework, it might sound like one, I agree :-) – Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 13:26
    
@Moron, "homework question", by definition is "a simplified and useless one". Not necessarily "easy". – Pavel Shved Jul 1 '10 at 13:40
3  
@Pavel: You made me laugh :-) Not all homework is useless, though. Have you considered that this could actually be useful in some embedded systems? It is hard to judge if anything is useless. Things can be used in ways you cannot even imagine. – Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 13:44
    
@NickLarsen: Thanks for cleaning up. I removed a sentence which was not required after the cleanup. – Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 13:51

Thinking about the O(1) in-place variant, but for now here's the O(N) solution

An O(N) space solution

If you can use an O(N) output array, then you can simply perform an inorder traversal. Every time you visit a node, add it to the output array.

Here's an implementation in Java:

import java.util.*;
public class Main {
    static void inorder(int[] bst, List<Integer> sorted, int node) {
        if (node < bst.length) {
            inorder(bst, sorted, node * 2 + 1);
            sorted.add(bst[node]);
            inorder(bst, sorted, node * 2 + 2);
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] bst = { 8, 4, 12, 2, 6, 10, 14, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 };
        final int N = bst.length;
        List<Integer> sorted = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        inorder(bst, sorted, 0);
        System.out.println(sorted);
        // prints "[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15]"
    }
}

Attachment

share|improve this answer
1  
As it demands constant memory, I don't think there can be an output array. But inorder traversal is of course the right approach. – Janick Bernet Jul 1 '10 at 13:09
    
Algorithm is correct, however it doesnt work in O(1) space. – phimuemue Jul 1 '10 at 13:12
    
This is not enough. After sorting the Array itself should be sorted. – gtikok Jul 1 '10 at 13:13
    
@inflagranti: Yes, this is O(n) space. Why can't there be other approaches? In fact, see my answer for one that isn't in-order. – Aryabhatta Jul 1 '10 at 13:19
    
Yeah, I didn't mean that in-order is the only right approach. But I think it should somehow be possible with in-order traversal. – Janick Bernet Jul 1 '10 at 13:23

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