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Writing a ton of web applications leveraging JSON/AJAX, I find myself returning tons literal javascript objects (JSON). For example, I may be request all the Cats from GetCats.asp. It would return:

[
  { 'id': 0, 'name': 'Persian' },
  { 'id': 1, 'name': 'Calico' },
  { 'id': 2, 'name': 'Tabby' }
]

Now, these are all Cat objects with behaviors. However, if I define a Cat object, function Cat() { }, I know of no EFFICIENT way to coax these literal objects into the behaviors of a user defined object.

I can do this by brute force of iterating through them and assigning functions, but it's not going to be pretty. Is there a nice, one line(or few), way of somehow "casting" this behavior onto these literal objects?

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5 Answers 5

There's no getting around the fact that you will have to iterate through all of your simple objects and change them to a different kind of object. You cannot avoid the loop. That being said you could create a constructor that takes a simple object like this and copies those values into the new instance.

Like this:

function Cat(c) {
  this.id = c.id;
  this.name = c.name;
}
Cat.prototype.meow = function() {alert('meow');}
Cat.prototype.displayName= function() {alert(this.name);}

var cats = [
  { 'id': 0, 'name': 'Persian' },
  { 'id': 1, 'name': 'Calico' },
  { 'id': 2, 'name': 'Tabby' }
];

for (i=0,len=cats.length; i<len; i++) {
  cats[i] = new Cat(cats[i]);
}

cats[0].meow();  // displays "meow"
cats[0].displayName();  // display "Persian"
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If you're using the json2 parser (or another one with a compatible interface), you can simply provide a callback to replace the raw objects with custom objects:

var catSource = '[ { "id": 0, "name": "Persian" }, { "id": 1, "name": "Calico" }, { "id": 2, "name": "Tabby" } ]';

function Cat(id, name)
{
   this.id = id;
   this.name = name;
}
Cat.prototype = 
{
   toString: function()
   {
      return this.name;
   }
};

function doStuff()
{
   var cats = JSON.parse(catSource, function(key, val)
   {
      // some expression to detect the type of val 
      if ( val.id !== undefined && val.name !== undefined )
         return new Cat(val.id, val.name);
      return val;
   });
   alert(cats);
}
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do you use prototype framework? if yes - here is an example


var cats = [
    {id: 15, name: 'Tables', count:45 },
    {id: 23, name: 'Chairs', count:34 }
];
var catsObjects = [];
cats.each(function(item){
    var newObject = new Cat();
    Object.extend(newObject, item);
    catsObjects.push(newObject);
});

basically Array.each function is the same as "for i < Array.length"
and Object.extend is the same as property-by-property adding properties to newObject

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Extending @Benry's answer.

I find that having an extend function to copy properties of one object onto another is essential. There is a semi-tradition for putting it onto Object; Object.extend() exists in many smaller libraries (NB: this is not the same as Object.prototype).

Object.extend = function ( take, give ) {
  for (var k in give) {
    if (give.hasOwnProperty(k)) {
      take[k] = give[k];
    }
  }
  return take;
}

This has the plus that you can use nice readable literal notation when writing your code:

function Cat (c) {
  Object.extend( this, ( c || this.defaults )  );
}

Object.extend(Cat.prototype, {

  meow : function() {
    alert( 'Meow, my name is ' + this.name );
  },

  defaults : {
    name : 'I have no name', 
    id   : null
  }

});

You can then create your army of cats quite simply:

var cats = [
  { 'id': 0, 'name': 'Persian' },
  { 'id': 1, 'name': 'Calico' },
  { 'id': 2, 'name': 'Tabby' }
];

for (i=0,len=cats.length; i<len; i++) {
  cats[i] = new Cat( cats[i] );
}

cats[0].meow();  // displays "meow, my name is Persian"
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Assign each object an appropriate prototype:

var list = [
  { 'id': 0, 'name': 'Persian' },
  { 'id': 1, 'name': 'Calico' },
  { 'id': 2, 'name': 'Tabby' }
];


for (obj in list)
{
  obj.prototype = new Cat();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work because their objects, not classes. –  Benry Nov 25 '08 at 0:03
    
Javascript doesn't have classes, it uses prototype based inheritance. This won't work for a different reason - those objects are notational objects, not first class objects that can be instanced - which are actually functions in javascript. –  Eran Galperin Nov 25 '08 at 0:11
    
Well, that hack David Flanagan calls them classes. I'll stick with him. But if we're really going pick nits, let's call them constructor functions. –  Benry Nov 25 '08 at 0:21
    
To my knowledge, this works for obj.__proto__, and only in Javascript (not Jscript/IE). –  Borgar Nov 25 '08 at 15:26

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